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Taronga Zoo Pak Boon's Calf

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Axl, 14 Jul 2010.

  1. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Birth Weights of Elephant Calves in Australian Zoos

    Luk Chai M09 (Gung x Thong Dee): 96kg
    Sabai M16 (Gung x Thong Dee): 101kg
    Tukta F10 (Gung x Pak Boon): 120kg
    Unnamed M17 (Gung x Pak Boon): 130kg


    Pathi Harn M10 (Bong Su x Porntip): 116kg
    Ongard M10 (Bong Su x Kulab): 142 kg
    Mali F10 (Bong Su x Dokoon): 111kg
    Man Jai M13 (Bong Su x Dokoon): 131kg
    Sanook M13 (Bong Su x Num Oi): 131kg


    Willow F16 (Putra Mas x Num Oi): 103kg

    So typically, the first calf is smaller in weight than subsequent calves (Num Oi's calves are the exception). Bong Su has fathered heavier calves than Gung and Putra Mas. Thong Dee is considered a small cow and has given birth to the two lightest calves out of the ten births to date. Kulab has given birth to the heaviest calf to date.

     
  2. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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  3. tdierikx

    tdierikx Well-Known Member

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    He might have been a decent sized birth, but still so tiny compared to his mum...

    [​IMG]

    T.
     
  4. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Great pic @tdierikx. It sounds like the three females are competing over who gets to look after this guy!
     
  5. tdierikx

    tdierikx Well-Known Member

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    Hahaha! That they are!

    Tukta is really miffed that the little fellow prefers Tang Mo to play with... and has been trying a lot of argey bargey with Tang Mo as a result - not that she gets very far with that, being only half Tang Mo's size... lol! Pak Boon breeds them tough... hehe!
     
  6. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Tang Mo has lots of aunty experience from when Luk Chai, Pathi Harn and Tukta were all young calves. If she's unable to have her own calves, I'm glad she can get so much joy from the other elephants' offspring, she clearly finds it very enriching and Tukta is surely learning a lot for when she has her own calf. I wonder if Taronga will look at breeding from Tukta in the next few years. It's important to breed females young of course for future reproductive success.
     
  7. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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  8. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  9. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    It's a shame Pak Boon's latest calf will grow up without same age herd mates. Luk Chai, Pathi Harn and Tukta were all born within 16 months of each other and clearly got immense enjoyment out of each other's company. At least Sabai at Taronga Western Plains Zoo can look forward to the arrival of Porntip's calf in around 12 months time (approximately 20 month age gap between the two calves).
    Tukta, who turns 7 this year looks huge compared to her newborn sibling and is already taking more of an aunty/caregiver role rather than a play mate role (though given their size difference, that is probably a good thing until the calf becomes more robust).
     
  10. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Pak Boon's calf named Jai Dee

    Taronga Zoo's baby elephant named in ceremony

    The newest member of the Asian elephant family at Taronga Zoo has been named Jai Dee meaning 'good heart'.

    The four-week-old calf was blessed in a ceremony on Friday with Thai Buddhist monks and Royal Thai Consul General Nathapol Khantahiran in attendance.

    Jai Dee was watched by his mum Pak Boon, his sister Tukta and aunt Tang Mo.

    The name was chosen by the late philanthropist Janis Salisbury who is considered 'the elephant grandma' due to her generous donations towards Taronga's Asian elephant breeding program.

    Jai Dee is the fourth elephant calf born under this special program.
     
  11. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Taronga Zoo Media Release on Jai Dee:

    TARONGA’S ELEPHANT CALF GETS A NAME WITH HEART

    The Director and CEO of Taronga Conservation Society Australia, Cameron Kerr, today announced Taronga’s new Elephant calf will be named “Jai Dee” meaning ‘good heart’ in Thai.

    The calf, born four weeks ago, was blessed with his new name today in a ceremony with Thai Buddhist Monks, which reflects his Thai cultural heritage. The name was chosen by the late philanthropist Janis Salisbury, whose generosity supported Taronga’s Asian Elephant Breeding Programme.

    “Taronga is grateful to the Royal Thai Consul General, Mr Nathapol Khantahiran and the Thai Buddhist Monks for making Jai Dee’s naming day so special. Although this is now the fourth Elephant calf naming ceremony at Taronga, every single one is precious to us,” said Taronga Conservation Society Australia Director and CEO Cameron Kerr.

    Jai Dee is the 10th calf born in the last 11 years to the regional Conservation breeding Program for Asian elephants in Australia, which includes Taronga Zoo. At Taronga Zoo, Luk Chai, the first male was born in 2009 followed by Pathi Harn in 2010. The first female calf Tukta was born in 2010, with Sabai born in 2016 at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

    “The speed and success of this program clearly demonstrates the benefits of a coordinated, scientifically based program to support Asian Elephants, of which there may be as few as 35,000 remaining in the wild,” said Mr Kerr.

    Jai Dee is the second calf that mother Pak Boon has given birth to, with sister Tukta (Thai for “doll”) born in 2010. Keepers were amazed that Pak Boon’s gestation for both Jai Dee and Pak Boon was almost identical at 659 days, with Jai Dee in the womb for only 20 minutes more.

    “Jai Dee certainly has a strong heart, and is growing exponentially; since his birth four weeks ago, he’s put on 40 kilograms by drinking 12 litres of his mother’s milk each day. Although he’s trying to figure out how his trunk works, he’s a little more stable standing on his own legs, with big sister Tukta keeping close watch over him with mother Pak Boon,” said Senior Keeper of Elephants Lucy Melo.

    “For the time being, Jai Dee can be seen from the lower paddock with his mother and sister, and we look forward to when they feel comfortable as a family and herd to let Jai Dee start exploring the top paddock,” said Senior Keeper Lucy.

    Jai Dee can be seen at different times throughout the day, exploring the lower paddock, playing with his mother Pak Boon, sister Tukta, and aunt Tang Mo.
     
  12. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Update on Jai Dee:

    Jai Dee grows in confidence

    Taronga’s newest elephant calf Jai Dee is growing in confidence as he takes charge of his surroundings, running between paddocks and enjoying the occasional swim, allowing the herd some much needed rest and the opportunity for Jai Dee to have a bit more freedom.

    “Initially they all stayed very close to him. Now they’re happy to let him run freely,” said Keeper Gabe Virgona.

    “Earlier this week while it was raining, he was by the waterfall for ages swimming away and loving it” said Keeper Gabe.

    The bath sessions have also been a great opportunity for visitors to catch him splashing around in a paddling pool made by Keepers from a disused rainwater tank.

    Sister Tukta was particularly protective to begin with, but after adjusting to her role in caring for him, she has adopted a more playful relationship with her baby brother.

    “Both enjoy rolling around in the mud. It has made her more of a kid again,” Keeper Gabe said.

    Following an initial teething period, the herd has now adjusted to life with Jai Dee and communicate their affection using chirps and trumpeting most notably at night time when they all cuddle together to go to sleep.

    All the care and affection Jai Dee has received has enabled him to flourish, already reaching 225kg, gaining 10kg a week since starting to try solid foods including hay, sweet potato, corn and apples.

    While still growing and learning how to use his trunk, which contains a staggering 40,000 muscles, used to feed, drink and trumpet, there’s always time for play.

    “He’s just a playful calf. He’s at that age where he’s very much into his play and exploring. And of course rolling in mud,” said Keeper Gabe.
     
  13. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Update on Jai Dee/Jai Dee turns One:

    Heart of Taronga's Elephant herd turns one

    Taronga Zoo Sydney today celebrated the birth of Asian Elephant calf Jai Dee one year ago this week with a special feed arranged by keepers in the shape of the number one. Jai Dee’s name, which means ‘good heart’ in Thai, was chosen by late philanthropist Janis Salisbury.

    In that time, the calf which is the fourth born at Taronga has grown from 130kgs to now 580kgs and has reached most growth milestones. These include: his milk tusks, which have been replaced by permanent tusks; and in addition to mother Pak Boon’s milk, he now eats hay and browse.

    Senior Elephant Keeper Lucy Melo said that his most impressive development has been his intelligence.

    “When elephant calves are born, there’s not much control of the trunk so it just flops about. Jai Dee now has full control of the 40,000 muscles in his trunk, and uses it to eat, dust bathe and snorkel as he swims in shallow water,” said Keeper Lucy.

    “Jai Dee is becoming a more confident swimmer, so his mother Pak Boon, sister Tukta and aunt Tang Mo are becoming more relaxed about letting him in the water,” Keeper Lucy said.

    “With that freedom, he is eager to explore his surroundings independently of the female herd, and he loves to carefully climb the rocks and logs in the paddocks,” she said.

    “He is an incredibly fast learner who doesn’t make mistakes in his behaviour and training, so given his intelligence we know to start planning for more complex stimulation as he grows into a young bull,” she said.

    “The only milestone for a calf of his age, which he has hasn’t yet reached, is his first trumpet. Jai Dee has made other vocalisations but he is yet to successfully trumpet, so we are excited for when he masters that natural skill,” she said.

    In the wild, Asian Elephants live across Southeast Asia, and are far more endangered than African Elephants. Estimates suggest as few as 35,000 Asian Elephants remain in the wild due to poaching and habitat loss. To help prevent extinction and preserve genetic diversity, the Australasian conservation breeding program has 10 calves born; five at Taronga Zoo Sydney and Taronga Western Plains Zoo Dubbo. Porntip at Taronga Western Plains Zoo Dubbo is due to birth to a calf in July 2018.
     
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