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Re-introduction of South China tigers ?

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by vogelcommando, 20 Sep 2014.

  1. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  2. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    One cannot reintroduce the already extinct :p
     
  3. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    What do you mean by already extinct? Aren't they just extinct in the wild with some in captivity? Many species, as I am sure you know have been re released into the wild after become extinct in the wild. Exp. California condor
     
  4. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    None of the animals in captivity are actually true South China tigers - they are hybrids of South China and Indochinese, and heavily inbred ones at that.
     
  5. nanoboy

    nanoboy Well-Known Member

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    You should tell National Geographic that then. Their article does not suggest or support your statement, does it?
     
  6. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    They aren't exactly going to be shouting about the impurity of the stock, are they? :p

    Panthera tigris ssp. amoyensis (South China Tiger)

     
  7. nanoboy

    nanoboy Well-Known Member

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    At the very least, I would expect Nat Geo to be factual and not intentionally omit reference to hybridisation. I refer to this paragraph:

    "Five South China tigers were taken from Shanghai Zoo to a converted South African sheep farm where they could be “re-wilded.” Within a few years one of the refugee tigers named Tiger Woods was fathering babies born, perhaps for the first time in decades, in at least a semi-wild condition. There are now 18 South China tigers in South Africa, giving hope that this animal may thrive once more. “We’ve gone from around 50 to 110 since 2002,” says Nilson. “It’s safe to say its the only subspecies that has doubled, which makes a major contribution to the global aim of doubling the population by 2022,” he adds."

    Is the "18 South China tigers in South Africa" statement inaccurate?
     
  8. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    No that is correct. They have done much better than was actually expected from what was effectively an untried experiment. They have bred from four founders(2.2) after an inauspicious start when the very first male died before they could breed. One of the two founder males has now died also but they have continued to breed them by crossing the least related animals etc. After an initial skew toward male births, it has been compensated by more females recently so that the sex ratio is now roughly equal. There is a family tree you can find of the breeding though I can't give you a reliable link.
     
  9. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    It would certainly be interesting to learn how Nat Geo would describe the captive populations of "Barbary" Lions, considering the fact they are in the same boat in terms of being thoroughly hybridised but claimed to be pure by the collections holding them :p
     
  10. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    I think it would depend on the style of the story and that Nat Geo would take the story at face value, depending on the source of the information they were supplied with. If it was simply about reintroduction of e.g. 'Barbary' Lions or 'South China' tigers, they would just report it as that, probably making no reference to possible impurity. But if their sources included information about possible hybridisation of same, that would be different of course.I think they wouldn't omit that deliberately but it would largely depend on the individual writer/editor and the particular angle they wanted to highlight.('Horses for courses' type of thing)

    But I don't think they would research/delve into such issues themselves off their own bat though.
     
  11. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  12. Arizona Docent

    Arizona Docent Moderator Staff Member

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    Since these tigers are all we have, I am for reintroduction. Hybrid South China tigers are better than no tigers at all.