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Rising and Disappearing Species

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by JVM, 28 Sep 2014.

  1. JVM

    JVM Well-Known Member

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    Kind of a simple but generalized thread - what kinds of animal species seem to be appearing more and more in zoos that were rare before? What kinds of species were once more common but seem to be on the decline?

    Snowleopard's 2014 zoo trip posted some interesting examples to me - the Asiatic Black Bear is swiftly declining in American zoos, and the Sichuan Takin, a pretty little-known species, seems to be cropping up more and more, most likely due to the Species Survival Plan. Other threads have discussed how some northern zoos are phasing out elephants and dolphins, and how Giant otters are becoming more common as well.
     
  2. Pleistohorse

    Pleistohorse Well-Known Member

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    Meerkats seem to have boomed in the last 20 years. Red River Hogs recently as well. Warthogs and African Wild Dogs seem to have become more common since the 1980's, although now appear to maybe be tapering off. Elk seem less common in "mainstream" zoos. European Bison are definitely blinking out. Many hoofed mammals seem to be much less common in zoo collections. The Leopard as well...although the Amur Leopard is become pretty common. Snow Leopards, Mexican Wolves, and Red Wolves too. Komodo Dragons also are much more common in zoos compared to 30 years ago. In my observation anyway.
     
  3. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    The one that spings to mind to me is the Bongo - at least in Europe. For about 20 - 30 it was realy, realy rare but now-a-days it's quite common and well breeding !
    Zootierliste mention 47 European collections keeping the East-african subspecies.
     
  4. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    Bongo are now prevented from breedng in many zoos. See my comment under the recent Cleveland(USA) Bongo photo.....

    Some other species becoming more common; Visayan Warty Pig; Raccoon Dog; Okapi(just a little bit), Giant Otter.
     
  5. Pleistohorse

    Pleistohorse Well-Known Member

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    Okapi definitely. They were rarely seen in the 1980's. I remember the Bronx Zoo suggesting they might be acquired back when the zoo renovated the Giraffe House.
     
  6. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    Were fossas very in the USA until recently? I had never heard of them but I seem to hear about them more.

    A disappearing species in the USA that's been mentioned numerous times is the lion-tailed macaque.
     
  7. Deer Forest

    Deer Forest Well-Known Member

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    I don't know much about the condition in other countries, but I can talk a lot about the animals native to China.

    Asiatic Black Bear is one of the commonest animals in China, but on the contrary there are not any American Black Bear in Chinese zoos. Maybe as the native black bear is so common, zoo directors all think there is no need to exhibit foreign black bear?:p

    As for Sichuan Takin, it's not as common as Golden takin. But in western countries, are Mishmi takin and Sichuan Takin more common?
     
  8. JVM

    JVM Well-Known Member

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    I've seen these firsthand - Lincoln Park Zoo's African Journey in 2003 replaced the former Large Mammal House and all of these animals were new species for the zoo. Related, I've noticed Warthogs tapering off at all three local zoos, all of which seem to favor the River hogs. I know Wild Dogs have an SSP which is usually a factor. Brookfield's had all of them since the nineties to my knowledge.

    I have to agree with this as well, it seems like many zoos are focusing on a couple hoofed species and phasing out any others. Milwaukee has a larger collection than either Chicago zoo, and deer especially seem to be on their way out.

    African leopards definitely seem on their way out in favor of the Amur species. Lincoln Park used to have a Persian leopard and a Snow leopard but now only has a single Amur specimen. Brookfield and Milwaukee have Snow and Amur. I know all three of my local zoos switched to Mexican wolves in the last fifteen years, although one (Lincoln Park again) later switched to Red wolves.

    Ten years ago I thought I'd read they were only in a couple American zoos but now they seem somewhat common outside my local area. I did see one in a temporary exhibition at the Shedd Aquarium which was an amazing experience.

    I tried to look but didn't find a comment on breeding, just on what part of the zoo they were from. What's the story? I'm curious. I know Milwaukee acquired it's first few Bongo around ten years ago. A Raccoon Dog would be really cool to see.

    I've never seen either in Chicago or at Milwaukee. Baboons seem to be disappearing in the USA as well from what I can tell since they aren't very threatened.

    This is what I figured myself. I actually never saw an American black bear in a zoo until recently either.

    I don't remember rhe details on Mishmi but I believe it's been kept in at least one American facility, and I know Sichuan Takin have grown out a lot in the last five to ten years when I believe at one point they were only housed in San Diego. They've been breeding well at Lincoln Park and only arrived five or so years ago. I believe Niabi Zoo also has a few and they lost their AZA acredation and are a pretty minor facility.
     
  9. Buldeo

    Buldeo Well-Known Member

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    San Fransisco shipped off one of their lion-tailed macaques recently. It's been a couple of months, but they should be down to one (could be none) at this point in time.


    Are mandrills popular? I don't recall seeing any in zoos until a few years ago when I moved back to the Bay Area.

    From an entirely casual observation, native North American species seem to be popular. And if not exactly news, they all seem to be getting new whiz bang enclosures.
     
  10. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    In European zoos Mandrills always have been popular and I guess their status has always been that it's quite a common species.
     
  11. GermanZooFan

    GermanZooFan Well-Known Member

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    Acoording to Zootierliste, there were 175 former zoos keeping cougars, while today there are just 90 (many as well but a lot fewer).
     
  12. Deer Forest

    Deer Forest Well-Known Member

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    Chinese zoos had great reduction of native species in 1990s.

    Before that time native animals were main part of Chinese zoos, but sadly Chinese zoos began to aspire for foreign species, and native species lost attention.

    Now we have realized the importance of protect native species but for some species it's too late. Some species may disappear soon in Chinese zoos, such as leopard, Asian golden cat, serow...
     
  13. Deer Forest

    Deer Forest Well-Known Member

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    I used to think the meerkat in movie "The Lion King" is very far from me, until they suddenly appeared in several Chinese zoos recent year.

    Some Chinese zoos tried to import African Wild Dogs, but it seemed that they were difficult to survive, most of them disappear soon after appear.

    There is no Komodo Dragons on display in China at present, but I believe they will appear soon.
     
  14. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Certainly it is a curious anomaly that the only known captive individual of the Chinese subspecies of Golden Cat (Pardofelis temminckii dominicanorum) is in the United Kingdom :rolleyes: the vast majority of those individuals held in China belong to the Indochinese subspecies (P. t. temminckii) - I am unsure as to whether any Tibetan (P. t. tristis) are found in Chinese collections.

    Of course, one cannot rule out some obscure little zoo tucked away where no one visits holding the Chinese.
     
  15. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

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    In my local area:

    Rising species: red panda, meerkat, greater flamingo, giraffe, clouded leopard, Amur tiger, katta, tapir, dwarf zebu...

    Dissappearing species: small cats, puma, nilgai, wild goats, chilean flamingo, deer species, mangabeys, macaques, guenons, white rhino, brown and black bears, waterfowl...

    Nile hippos seem to have good future, 3 Czech zoos plan to start with them.
    Local holding capacity for elephants might increase by 40% in next decade if all plans materialize.
    Gnus´downward tendency was stopped, dama gazella is doomed, goral rose and fell again.
     
  16. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Ring-tailed lemurs have always been the most common lemur species in captivity but now-a-days they can be seen is realy every zoo.
    The Ruffed lemur - both the black and white and the red ones - were very rare about 30 years ago but are now among the most commonly kept species.
     
  17. JVM

    JVM Well-Known Member

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    Really pleased with all of the responses here!

    I've noticed it a lot with the bears. Many zoos seemed to be getting new polar bear enclosures, and other carnivores, but I've seen very little advancement in terms of North American herbivores. Maybe I'm just not from the best part of the country for that sort of thing. Brookfield's Bison are in a beautiful enclosure, I will say that.

    They seem to be much more common in smaller facilities than larger ones. I've never seen LPZ's cougars. Milwaukee had a few until their 2005 renovation and I thnink it was the only big cat species cut. I remember them being very active.

    Speaking purely locally, drill species were phased out of both Chicago zoos recently, which is a big shame as they're such a unique species. LPZ's drills have been replaced by a lemur of some sort I believe. I know Brookfield's long-term plans suggest mandrills may return one day. Milwaukee still has mandrills I think. I notice baboons are being phased out as well.

    That's a shame. Native species are very important and China has no shortage of unique species and biodiversity to display, and that's not even touching the fact so many of it's species are endangered today.

    I think AWD's are going to decline as it seems they can be difficult to maintain long-term, especially as they like large spaces and have little range to reintroduce to yet in the wild. China deserves a good Komodo display, they are such fascinating and breathtaking species.

    That's a great list of rising species but the list of declining species is so disappointing and mostly seems typical of many zoos, especially with deer, macaques, and white rhinos. What is replacing the brown and black bears? Shame about dama gazelle as well.

    I forget there are lemurs nearby as Brookfield keeps them only in the Children's Zoo. They definitely seem to be getting more and more common. You think unique species from such a small island would be hard to come by but I suppose with all of the habitat destruction the lemurs have to go somewhere.
     
  18. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    BTW also the 3th subspecies, the Belted ruffed lemur starts to pop-up at several zoos ( for example http://www.zoochat.com/210/belted-black-white-ruffed-lemur-386469/ )
     
  19. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    To be accurate, although Belted is indeed currently classed as one of three subspecies, the Red Ruffed is not one of them having been split in 2001. The third subspecies - which is not held in any captive collections worldwide - is the Southern Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata editorum)

    However, it is increasingly likely that the three Black-and-White taxa - editorum, subcincta and variegata - will all be granted full species status in time.
     
  20. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    I first saw ruffed lemurs at London in around 1970, they had a black and white in the Clore and brought a red in from Paris for the first UK breeding. A couple of years later I was very impressed by a very active group in Basle, which were kept in a tall indoor cage (which had previously held their original gorilla pair).
    Since that time the range of lemur species in zoos has expanded greatly, if you had told me all those years ago that I would eventually see gentle lemurs, sifaka and aye-aye in British zoos I would not have believed you.
    On the other hand the number of monkey species on show in the UK has declined significantly: I don't expect that we will see delicate species like douc, proboscis or uakari again for a long time and there are far fewer mangabeys, guenons and macaques around than there were 30 years ago. In the UK there are no talapoins, Hamlyn's monkeys or moor macaques and many other species are down to one or two old animals including Allen's swamp monkeys, crowned, spot-nosed and mona guenons. A few other species have increased in the UK, notably crested macaques, lion-tailed macaques, Javan langurs, black howlers and white-faced sakis.

    Alan