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Some US zoos to potentially receive Maui Parrotbill

Discussion in 'United States' started by birdsandbats, 21 Jul 2021.

  1. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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  2. TinoPup

    TinoPup Well-Known Member

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    PA could be Philly as well, given their success with guam birds. The only place I can think of for VA would be SCBI.
     
  3. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I can understand the concerns and criticism of Mossman and I do think they are valid.

    But at the same time he talks about loss of cultural heritage from the removal of these birds and though I can understand where he's coming from is it not a bigger and far more tragic loss of indigenous Hawaiian cultural / natural heritage to lose the species to extinction rather than a temporary provisional move to Zoo captive breeding facilities ?
     
  4. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    I would welcome an ex situation effort and all 3 facilities are experienced avicultural facilities.

    I would welcome a local ex site effort at Panaewa and Honolulu Zoos. Basically, while I acknowledge local native sensitivities, I do think reservations are b********** in the face of threats to Hawaiian threatened species as it is mankind that is basically driving the 6th Extinction Crisis. What local ownership or care has prevented this situation from developing, unwelcome few.

    Mind you: This coming from a conservationist well aware and always thinking local involvement as prima inter pares essential, I just do not buy into this AR inspired non action oriented clientele, which is exactly the reason conservation of the Maui parrotbill has to go to initiate an ex sit-up component to in site protection of the species.

    Now I am not about to step on local cultural sensitivities but I just like to point out that since colonization of the Hawaiian archipelago is when local flora, fauna and habitats have come under threat from human development and expansion. We and local communities need to take that responsibility as well as the urgency to act on board now rather than in 50-100 years when we are basically too little too late.

    End of reality check.


    Great this project is happening, TIMELY.
     
  5. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yes I agree with you about this and I also think that involvement of zoos in Hawaii would go some way to alleviating local indigenous Hawaiian concerns.

    I know biosecurity is an incredibly difficult thing to ensure but why can't some parrotbill be exhibited in one of the Hawaiian zoos as a compromise that builds up trust and illustrates to the indigenous peoples that they won't be seeing the back of this species for good ?

    It isn't a total impossibility to make enclosures that are mosquito proof to prevent avian malaria infection is it ?

    Anyway yeah absolutely there are always trade offs in conservation and I do think that it is the lesser of two evils for the parrotbill population to be built up ex-situ in zoos in the US provisionally for the next few years than total extinction in the wild.
     
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  6. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    Very few zoos in the USA have real experience in breeding more delicate songbirds, so exporting them from Hawaii is the best option. If a facility in Hawaii wants to step in, they would be keen to send offspring, I guess.
     
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  7. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I didn't understand the first part of what you said.

    If few zoos in the US have expertise with delicate song birds then why would this be best option ?

    Do you mean in terms of gaining valuable experience ?
     
  8. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I believe what Jurek meant is that the best option is to send them to those few zoos in the US that *do* have expertise with delicate songbirds, which will be on the mainland.

    "Mosquito-proof" in biosecurity situations seems like a precarious designation. I've slept under mosquito nets before, and all it takes is one tiny hole or tear in an inconspicuous place to lead to a containment failure - which in this case could spell the end for all of the birds in the enclosure.

    Of course, they could be held in indoor biosecure facilities... but that would sort of negate a lot of the reasons for keeping them in Hawaii to begin with (though not the cultural/heritage-related ones).
     
  9. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    I agree. What the inborn American Hawaiian suggest sit back do nothing on the back of failed releases due to avian zoonotics and mosquito born diseases is a lame duck advice. The Maui parrotbill needs ex situ minds to work on creative conservation and saving the species and not stalling and wait for imminent extinction.
     
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