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Species We Have Gained Over The Last Quarter Of A Century

Discussion in 'Europe - General' started by Shorts, 30 Jul 2016.

  1. Shorts

    Shorts Well-Known Member

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    Being a “glass half full” kind of person (despite, perhaps paradoxically, managing to be seriously cynical at the same time) I thought the forum needed an optimistic counter to Tea Loving Dave's excellent but more pessimistic, death by a thousand cuts, “Species we have lost over the last quarter of a century” thread.

    Whilst we all like a moan, myself included, I think it's important not to forget that whilst many interesting species have been lost we (European zoos) have also gained quite a few nice “new” ones over the last two and a half decades.

    So the idea of this thread is to highlight all those species that weren't with us in 1991 but are now (and anything new that comes along in the interim).

    I'll start the ball rolling with a short, mammal heavy, list and would welcome others' contributions (especially for birds where I have less historic knowledge, maybe there's very few?):

    Chinese Pangolin
    Ring-tailed mongoose/vontisa
    Narrow-striped mongoose/boky
    Gerenuk
    Chacoan peccary
    Yellow-spotted rock hyrax
    Bear cuscus
    Short-tailed spotted cuscus
    Black & rufous elephant shrew
    Checkered elephant shrew
    Owston's (palm) civet
    Tayra
    Smooth-coated otter
    Spot-necked otter
    Greater grisson
    Gharial (?)
    Marco Polo sheep
    Blue duiker
    Iberian lynx
    Bornean bearded pig
    Visayan warty pig
    Baird's tapir

    I look forward to other's contributions (or corrections:D).

    And don't waste your breath telling me some of the species are hardly established or dying out in captivity (this thread's a counter to species we've lost and some of those species (lost) we, similarly, never really had in the first place, so there:p) -it's about the here and now and what we're lucky enough (resources permitting, as always) to be able to see.
     
  2. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Excellent :) I *have* been wanting to start a thread along these lines, but didn't quite know where to start :p along with the fact that the main motivation for the other thread is to promote the upload of more old photographs into the gallery, whilst I suspect all of the major arrivals into European collections in the last 25 years or so *have* been photographed.

    As a little counter to my existing thread, I reckon I will help you get the ball rolling by going through the other thread for any species which have *returned* to European collections since I started it :)

    A new import of these arrived at Walsrode shortly before my visit - with large numbers onshow! I will be uploading photos from said trip eventually, but I suspect others will beat me to uploading shots of this species.

    Another one popped up in 2015 - no one is quite sure whether this was a re-identified Western, or a genuinely new individual.

    These have now turned up at North Anston Tropical House.

    Moscow is giving these another shot at present.

    Walsrode resumed keeping this taxon in early 2016, and there are already shots of the onshow male in the galler :)
     
  3. kiang

    kiang Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Great idea for a thread, cheers to your half full glass, 2 that come to mind immediately for me are
    Philippine crocodile & golden takin?
     
  4. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Excellent topic for a thread.

    What about Balabac chevrotain, red duiker and Sulawesi tarsier?

    Indeed, Liberec Zoo was the first to receive golden takin; I was fortunate to see them there not long after they arrived.
     
    Last edited: 31 Jul 2016
  5. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    Two mammals that come to mind are Eastern Quoll and Feather-tail Glider.
     
  6. Shorts

    Shorts Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your comments so far.

    Just thought of another one, Chacoan Mara (lovely little things).
     
  7. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    I think it's worth pointing out that this thread covers two distinct groups of species. Some species are either entirely new to European zoos or effectively so, as they were previously kept around a hundred years ago, in one of the grand old zoos or in private menageries like the Earl of Derby's: these species could be labelled net gains. But there are also several species which were held in several collections up to the end of the 1970s (or even later), but subsequently died out and have now been reimported and are either now re-established, or we trust that they soon will be. Species on Shorts' list such as grison, tayra and the otters fall into this category and so I think that ZooChat's greybeards, who remember those days, are entitled to call them regains.

    My first thought was the aye-aye, but I see that Gerald Durrell brought the first specimens to Jersey in 1990 (along with giant jumping rats). So they just fall outside the 25 year line for this thread, but they are my favourite net gains. Moreover there were more significant arrivals in Jersey in 1990 - the black lion tamarin and the wonderful pied tamarin (if Zootierliste is correct).
    The primate I would nominate as a net gain since 1991 is the pygmy slow loris.
    The rusty-spotted cat also arrived in 1990, at Howletts, but it's worth a mention too. A regain is Pallas' cat, which was held in several European collections in the '70s, but is now re-established.
    Off the top of my head, I would also mention the Australian water rat and the Philippine cloud rats which I think qualify as regains, if not as net gains.

    It would need a lot of research to make a detailed list of birds, reptiles, amphibians and fishes, as many species were imported by the pet trade before they appeared in zoos. I think many species which are relatively common in trade have been imported for the first time since 1991. Off the top of my head I would suggest that many Malagasy species, including chameleons, Mantella frogs and cichlids would qualify, as would New Caledonian geckos, Lygodactylus day geckos and many arrow poison frogs.

    Alan
     
    Last edited: 1 Aug 2016
  8. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    There were already aye-ayes in Europe when Durrell brought them to Jersey in 1990; I first saw the species in Vincennes Zoo (Paris) in 1987; I believe they arrived there the previous year.

    (Of course London Zoo’s first aye-aye was more than a century earlier back in 1862!)

    Again, I think that there were already rusty-spotted cat in Europe when Howletts acquired them in 1990; I saw them on several occasions at Frankfurt Zoo during the 1980s.
     
  9. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    Fair enough about the aye-ayes, it pushes the date back a little further than 1990. I should have been subspecific about the Sri Lankan rusty-spotteds too :)
    This a complicated subject!
    I have been thinking about it a little more and there is one particular group of species which we have gained since 1991 - the species which have been discovered and described since that year. For example the pin-striped damba (Paretroplus menarambo) was only described in 1992. I'm not sure if any zoo mammals or birds fall into this category, but there must be several reptiles, amphibia and fishes that do.

    Alan
     
  10. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    The Panay Cloudrat at ZSL London qualifies, having been described in 1996.
     
  11. Carl Jones

    Carl Jones Well-Known Member

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    The interesting question is what species we will still have in 25 years. The rapid turn over of many species in captivity is alarming. Zoos really need to learn how to maintain populations long-term. It is worrying how lax some collections are with such important species as Aye-ayes. There needs to be more investment in keeping Aye-ayes correctly. Keeping them in nocturnal houses, which seems to be the norm, is akin to keeping them in deprivation chambers.
     
    Last edited: 1 Aug 2016
  12. kiang

    kiang Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Were there Javan green magpies in Europe before Chester's import?
    Aye Ayes seem to be doing rather well now, more collections breeding them.
    Giant anteaters seem to be spreading at quite a rate

    A few more;
    Tasmanian wombat
    Red backed bearded saki
    Palawan binturong
    Common cusimanse??
    Spotted fanaloka
    Eastern & Southern aardwolf
    Arabian striped hyena
    Crab eating raccoon??
    Southern tree hyrax
    Arabian rock hyrax
    Northern warthog (from the original Dutch import?)
    Greater mouse deer
    American caribou
    Philippine deer
    Black lechwe?
    Libyan Barbary sheep
     
    Last edited: 1 Aug 2016
  13. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    An interesting list:-

    I think that Mulhouse Zoo was first European zoo in comparatively recent times to receive Prince Alfred’s deer (Philippine spotted deer) although that was slightly before the “last quarter of a century” timeline of this thread.

    I thought about mentioning fanaloka (a particular favourite species of mine) on an earlier post in this thread; however, to the best of my knowledge there are none in Europe other than at the RSCC and since that is now, sadly, closed to the public I didn’t include them as I thought this thread was only about species in zoos open to the public not about those in private collections.
     
    Last edited: 2 Aug 2016
  14. kiang

    kiang Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I knew it was tight to the time limit with the deer along with the cusimanse too.
    Hopefully RSCC will do a couple of open days.
    Are there still Alaskan moose in Europe?
     
  15. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Personally I'd still count stuff that came in during 1990 for this thread, given that was the cut-off for my thread and hence would allow the two threads to be directly comparable.

    To go through Kiang's list, using the "net gain" and "regain" categories suggested above; within the former category I am including species absent from Europe for more than 75 years at the time of their return to Europe as well as those which are genuinely new.

    Javan Green Magpie - Regain; missing from Europe between 2007 and 2015
    Aye Aye - invalid for this thread, has been present continuously since 1986
    Giant Anteater - invalid for this thread, has been present continously since 1954!
    Tasmanian Wombat - invalid for this thread, has been present continuously since 1984
    Red backed bearded saki - Regain; missing from Europe between 1992 and 2010.
    Palawan Binturong - Net gain; first ever European import in 2010.
    Common cusimanse - Regain; missing from Europe between 1994 and 2002
    Eastern Aardwolf - Net gain; first ever European import in 2010.
    Southern Aardwolf - invalid for this thread, has been present continuously since 1967.
    Arabian striped hyena - Regain; missing from Europe between 1940 and 2008.
    Crab eating raccoon - Regain; missing from Europe between 2006 and 2008.
    Southern tree hyrax - Regain; missing from Europe between c.1945 and 2008.
    Arabian rock hyrax - Net gain; first ever European import in 2011.
    Northern warthog - invalid for this thread, has been present continuously since 1951.
    Greater mouse deer - Net gain; missing from Europe between 1928 and c.2004
    American caribou - Regain; missing from Europe between c.1991 and 2007.
    Philippine deer - Regain; missing from Europe between 1940 and 1990.
    Black lechwe - Net gain; first import into Europe in 2008.
    Libyan Barbary sheep - not sure when Rome went out of these, so either a regain or net gain.

    In answer to your other query, there are no Alaskan Moose sensu stricto left in Europe, and only 2,0 non-subspecific American Moose remain.
     
  16. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Zootierliste is good but there are gaps.

    The first European import of Arabian rock hyrax was not in 2011; London Zoo acquired this form more than a century earlier in 1908.
     
  17. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Fair enough :) though by the criteria I noted that would still have counted as a net gain. Considering how well they breed at CWP I think the only thing preventing them from getting a better foothold is the fact the Cape Rock Hyrax is the taxon being focused on by collections.
     
  18. temp

    temp Well-Known Member

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    Sumatran Laughingthrush aka Black-and-white Laughingthrush, now maintained at quite a number of zoos as part of a breeding project since the wild population is disappearing fast. It might have been kept before (as a subspecies of White-crested Laughingthrush), but I guess not.

    It looks like the related Blue-crowned Laughingthrush, another species now maintained many places as part of a breeding project, just barely falls outside the time limit (having been present since 1989, per zootierliste).
     
  19. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    The Black-and white laughing thrush was surtainly kept before 1989, I had one myself 1986 and he species was seen regualary in the trade in the mid-1980. If I remember correctly I've seen them also at Rotterdam Zoo in those days. Will up-load a ( VERY bad ) photo of the bird in my privat collection from around 1986 in the Netherlands - others Gallery.
     
  20. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    1 complete new species coming into captivity during this period was the Montserrat oriole. Durrell / Jersey recieved the first birds 1999 and now a small number of ( European ) collections are keeping and breeding them.
    Another species which came to Durrell / Jersey in the same year can also be found in a number of collections but is not completly new - London Zoo already kept Mountain chickens during the 1880-ties.
    If we blend-out that Cleres in France kept Rose-bellied bunting(s?) around 1969, this can also be seen as a "new" species, 2 Dutch collections keeping it at the moment.