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Spotted cuscus in captivity?

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Vareciak, 17 Oct 2015.

  1. Vareciak

    Vareciak Member

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    Does anyone know how many facilities hold spotted cuscus? I am only aware of the port moresby national park that have successfully bred them this year.
     
  2. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    RSCC had them, which have now gone to Rhenen.
     
  3. devilfish

    devilfish Well-Known Member

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    I believe a few Australian collections hold individual specimens too.

    EDIT: Sorry, I'd misinterpreted some information. As far as we can establish, there aren't any (or perhaps very few, at best) in Australian zoos currently.
     
    Last edited: 19 Oct 2015
  4. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    not that I'm aware of. Do you know of any?
     
  5. tetrapod

    tetrapod Well-Known Member

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    Not aware of any spotted cuscus in captivity in Australia. Pretty rare taxon in northern Queensland and I'm guessing that those kept in the recent past (Taronga, Perth) may have been descendents of individuals imported from New Guinea. Perth individual died in mid 90s was the last one that I am aware of.
     
  6. robmv

    robmv Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Just the one individual unfortunately.
     
  7. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    I have 1998 as the last date for Perth.

    The first zoo in Australia recorded as holding spotted cuscus was Healesville in 1949, and I suspect that was probably an Australian specimen. Quite a few appear to have been imported in the 60s and 70s from New Guinea, mostly by Taronga - the first to breed them was the Australian Reptile Park in the 70s but they were also kept at Melbourne in the 70s, Taronga from the mid-60s through to the mid-80s, and Perth from the late-70s to late-90s.


    Outside Australian zoos, I just came across this individual at Wenling Zoo in China in 2011: BringItToLight ? Mystery Zoo Critter Likely 'Dumped Novelty Pet'

    And this one at Kumamoto City Zoo in Japan in 2012: Common Spotted Cuscus - a photo on Flickriver
     
  8. tetrapod

    tetrapod Well-Known Member

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    You may be correct. I thought it was a couple of years earlier though.
     
  9. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    a photo of this animal: Cuscus (spotted), [i.e. Healesville] Sanctuary. [picture] , State Library of Victoria

    With some further reading, I think the Healesville animal(s) probably originated in New Guinea after all. David Fleay himself collected a number of live spotted cuscus in New Guinea, as he writes in this 1948 newspaper article: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/69118654
     
  10. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    I have been looking through my photo collection, for other things, as it happens. I have photos (transparencies) of spotted cuscus at Stuttgart (1973) and Twycross (1977): neither date matches with the dates on Zootierliste.

    Alan
     
  11. tetrapod

    tetrapod Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't the Twycross animal(s) part of the New Guinea import that included Doria's(?) tree kangaroos and a fruit bat (I think) mentioned in a Molly Badham book? Late 70s would sound about right.