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The Mesozoic Zoo Society

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by Zoofan15, 6 Apr 2019.

  1. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    The Mesozoic Zoo Society

    Introduction:


    Inspired by the success of some of the fantasy forums most successful threads, I have formulated a thread which encorporates the best aspects of each game.

    The Mesozoic Zoo Society features the direction of ‘Zoo Decisions’; the free form creativity of ‘Zoo Community’; the interface of ‘The Randomised Zoo’; and most importantly, the dinosaurs of ‘Prehistoric Park.’

    The Mesozoic Zoo Society takes it’s name from the Mesozoic Era; which includes the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. It is a society, which will evolve to include multiple facilities around the world, all aimed at preserving captive populations of dinosaurs.

    Rules:

    If
    you want to join the society, comment below to receive a dinosaur related theme e.g. Sauropods.

    Once given a theme, you must do the following:

    Choose 5 dinosaurs relevant to your theme (e.g. five Sauropods) and detail the numbers held

    State the location of your zoo

    State the name of your zoo

    After you have done this, you will be asked three questions. Satisfactorily answering all three questions will result in your registration with the Mesozoic Zoo Society.

    Please note: nobody is married to their allocated theme. After you have registered, you are welcome to trade freely with any other registered member to acquire dinosaurs from outside your theme. Trades must be conducted publicly and fairly.

    Restricted species: Tyrannosaurus rex and hybrid dinosaurs are considered restricted species. They may not be chosen as your five starter species (even if relevant to your theme). They will become available as prizes to competitions organised regularly by @Zoofan15. Once a breeding pair is held by a facility, offspring may be bred and exchanged amongst members.

    Additional Guidelines:

    Dinosaurs may breed only through sexual reproduction (not asexual) i.e. you must hold a male and female of that species to breed them.

    Since there is great variation in generational gaps and lifespans i.e a Velociraptor would reach reproductive age at 12 months and live up to 15 years; while a Diplodocus would reach reproductive age at 10-15 years and live up to 80 years, it would be impossible to work to a time scale without expecting the Velociraptor holders to update their species list weekly because they’ve died of old age; or expecting the Diplodocus holders to wait months for their hatchlings to reach maturity.

    Therefore, we will work to the time scale of two weeks = time taken for offspring to reach reproductive age. Species may be bred once every two weeks per holder. The hatchlings will be considered reproductively mature two weeks after hatching, regardless of their species. Newborn hatchlings can be exchanged immediately between registered facilities, but the receiving facility must wait two weeks from their date of hatching to breed them. The age of any dinosaur past the age of two weeks (reproductive age) will be considered negligible i.e. Tyrannosaurus rex would typically die 3-4 years (long before it’s offspring had reached maturity). Instead people will be left to apply common sense to the lifespans of their dinosaurs.
     
  2. CloudPardus

    CloudPardus Well-Known Member

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    As a Huge Dinosaur nerd this is a dream come true lol Well i request a theme for my dinosaur park!
     
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  3. SpinyLiving

    SpinyLiving Well-Known Member

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    It's nice that my now dead thread was mentioned. It was never very popular, but it was fun while it lasted. I have high hopes for this thread @Zoofan15! I would like to request a theme for my dinosaur park.
     
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  4. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    This sounds interesting! Can I get a theme?
     
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  5. Yi Qi

    Yi Qi Well-Known Member

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    I would like dinosaurs recovered from Canada for my theme please.
     
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  6. SpinyLiving

    SpinyLiving Well-Known Member

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    Also a question I have @Zoofan15 is how will acquiring new dinosaurs, creating hybrids, and time will work? Will we use the Prehistoric Park method of acquiring dinosaurs (Time portal into the past, a couple of scenarios/decisions like in Zoo Decisions, bada bing, bada boom we have a dinosaur) or will we have dig teams that dig up fossils and extract the DNA from them? I'm assuming that hybrids will have to be genetically created, since if you wanted an Indom you can't just get a raptor and a Rex to breed. Perhaps if someone wanted to create a hybrid you would put it through a randomizer first? If you think about it, the Indominus Rex has so many different DNAs in it that there was a 50% chance of being successful. Then with the Indoraptor, they added even more raptor DNA to it, so wouldn't there be like a 75% chance that the dinosaur would be a regular raptor? The genetical odds are very confusing. And will time be like Zoo Community, with the time being 1-2 days equal a month? Or will there be a different real time to fictional time ratio? One final question that I came up with while writing this is will someone keep a genetic database (a species list) of every dinosaur in every park?
     
  7. Hipporex

    Hipporex Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I don't know I mean I've never been that much into prehistoric creatures but I suppose I'll give it a try. (*the intensity of the sarcasm in this statement cannot be exaggerated enough*)
     
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  8. SpinyLiving

    SpinyLiving Well-Known Member

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    Sarcasm to the max lol :p
     
  9. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Sure! Your theme is Sauropods. :)
     
  10. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    It was a great idea @SpinyLiving. I hope we can all have fun with this one.

    Your theme is Raptors.
     
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  11. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Sure! Your theme is Dinosaurs discovered in Great Britain.
     
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  12. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    I choose the theme @Yi Qi but since you have expressed an interest in Canadian dinosaurs...Your theme is Provinces of Canada.

    You can use this list if you want:

    Canadian Dinosaur Fossil Locations - ZoomDinosaurs.com

    There must be at least four provinces represented in your zoo (i.e. they can’t all be from Alberta). :cool:
     
  13. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    I wasn’t aware you liked dinosaurs @Hipporex! You kept that well and truly under your hat. :p

    Your theme is Defensive Dinosaurs.
     
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  14. Yi Qi

    Yi Qi Well-Known Member

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    We can include other non-dinosaurs, right?
     
  15. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    The initial dinosaurs (everyone’s five starter species) will captured by a time portal. They will be allowed to capture as many as they want of that species, but are expected to be realistic i.e. not having multiple pairs of a territorial dinosaur sharing an exhibit; or having 100 Diplodocus.

    Tyrannosaurus rex (a restricted species) will be sourced via the time portal. Hybrids will be created by a central genetics team in London that work for our zoo. Hybrids that have been successfully created by them will be announced as prizes through competitions. We will have no input into the process of creating the hybrids at this stage, but the DNA of the species used in creating the hybrid will be specified.

    As for time, it’s difficult as dinosaurs like Diplodocus weren’t thought to breed until at least 10 years of age so even if we had a ratio of two days = a month, it would still be 240 days before someone could breed from the newly hatched Diplodocus they’d just traded with someone. Alternatively, if we sped the timeline up i.e. one day = one year, the Velociraptor pack with an average lifespan of 15 years, would need replacing every two weeks. Therefore, the time frame I have devised is:

    Two weeks = time taken for hatchlings to reach reproductive age. Species may be bred once every two weeks per holder. The hatchlings will be considered reproductively mature two weeks after hatching, regardless of their species. Newborn hatchlings can be exchanged immediately between registered facilities, but the receiving facility must wait two weeks from their date of hatching to breed them. The age of any dinosaur past the age of two weeks (reproductive age) will be considered negligible i.e. Tyrannosaurus rex would typically die 3-4 years after breeding (long before it’s offspring had reached maturity). Instead people will be left to apply common sense to the lifespans of their dinosaurs.

    If somebody would like to volunteer themselves for the task of maintaining a registrar of all our dinosaurs, that would be much appreciated. :cool:
     
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  16. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    As long as they’re from the Mesozoic era (i.e. Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods).
     
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  17. Hipporex

    Hipporex Well-Known Member

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    Name: Primeval Creatures
    Location: San Diego, California

    Species:
    Gigantspinosaurus sichuanensis, Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis, Pachyrhinosaurus lakustai, Tarchia kielanae, Therizinosaurus cheloniformis

    Since these are extinct animals, I'll take educated guesses about there behavior and thus how they can be exhibited:

    G. sichuanensis: Females live in herds of up to 14 while the males form small bachelor groups of only 2 to 6. Here at "Primeval Creatures" we have a large paddock for a herd of 12 adults females and a smaller paddock for 5 adult males. We mix the two only during breeding season but, when we do, we have to observe the males carefully as they apparently will fight to the death over mating rights (we originally had 6 males).

    P. wyomingensis: They lived in mixed-sex herds of up to 18. Although a herd may contain multiple males, only one had breeding rights to the females. The males butt heads each breeding season to see which is given said rights. We have three herds in three different paddocks.
    Paddock one: 12 females, 3 males
    Paddock two: 9 females, 8 males
    Paddock three: 14 females, 6 males (this paddock is over max. capacity and because of it, aggressive interactions are starting to occur, we are working on building a 4th paddock)

    P. lakustai: They lived in massive mixed-sex herds. Each male will fight to the right to one female and the pair will stay together for the breeding season. The following season they'll usually end up with a new partner. We have a massive herd of 25 females and 17 males that living in the same paddock.

    T. kielanae: They are extremely territorial and only interact during the breeding season. Thus we keep each animal in its own exhibit. We have 5 males and 5 females.

    T. cheloniformis: Forms monogamous pairs that last a lifetime. They'll fiercely defend there nesting grounds from other therizinosaur pairs. We have 4 paddock, each with one male and one female.
     
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  18. Yi Qi

    Yi Qi Well-Known Member

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    Prehistorica
    The park is located in Saskatchewan on converted farmland

    Fundy Coast
    • 2.4 Anchisaurus - Inhabit three separate paddocks, each 2.5-3 hectares.
    • 1.1 Dilophosaurus spp. - a monogamous pair living in a 7-hectare enclosure
    Nearby is a tank which could hould big aquatic creatures like Tanystropheus.

    Drumheller Valley
    A six-square kilometer enclosure that could potentially hold bigger ornithischians. Currently holds
    • 4.8 Parksosaurus
    • 6.4 Ornithomimus
    0.2 Albertosaurus live in a separate pair of paddocks, one of which is gravid.
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2019
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  19. SpinyLiving

    SpinyLiving Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to burst your bubble @Yi Qi, but Grallator is a ichnogenus, not a animalgenus. This means that it's a trace fossil that could have been made by any carnivore. Even if bones of a carnivorous dinosaur were found next to such traces, that dinosaur wouldn't be called Grallator, but would get it's own name. Just like Haenamichnus is the name of a certain kind of pterosaur footprint, but no pterosaur is actually called Haenamichnus.
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2019
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  20. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    That’s amazing @Hipporex. I’m looking forward to learning about the multitude of different dinosaurs out there.

    Your registration questions are:

    1. If you breed P. wyomingensis and all resulting offspring are male; how do you intend to prevent injury from aggression (especially competition over females)?

    2. When introducing a pair of T. kielanae for breeding, what method/s would you use to separate two individuals if necessary.

    3. If one of the T. cheloniformis pairs was to lose either the male or the female, do you anticipate a new mate could be introduced to the remaining male/female?
     
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