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Toronto Zoo Toronto Zoo - Births, Deaths and Transfers 2016

Discussion in 'Canada' started by TZFan, 27 Dec 2015.

  1. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    With the new year approaching time to start a new thread. I have a feeling the 2016 thread will be a busy one with lots of births, a couple nice transfers in and out and hopefully very few sad deaths.
     
  2. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    The transfer recommendation for the male river otter from Buffalo is still in place so maybe he will finally arrive this year. The status of the recommendation does say in progress so there is reason to be hopeful for 2017 otter pups.
     
  3. cypher

    cypher Well-Known Member

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    Let's hope this happens sooner rather than later. It's been quite some time since the exhibit had 2 Otters in the exhibit at the same time. Especially having them interact with each other.
     
  4. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    Even if the made otter does arrive its been recommended they follow a seasonal pair sort of protocol. They will just keep them together during breeding season and then split them up the remainder of the year to promote breeding. This strategy is proving effective at other zoos so our zoo is likely to follow that strategy. Other then breeding season multiple otters will only happen when Talise has pups she's rearing pup and possibly the pups themselves together once Talise is ready for another litter and they are awaiting homes. This could happen a bit as Talise is a potential founder and is already 5 years old (most peak out on breeding by 10 though litters after that point are possible for another 4 years). Even if he arrived today the odds are that there would be no litter. While breeding season could last until April giving him time to settle in and meet Talis, he is only a year old and most males start breeding at 2. 2017 will likely be the first chance for pups making Talise 6, thus giving 4 potential litters before her reproductive potential will begin to diminish. Given Talise's genetic importance if she can breed the SSP is likely to ask that she breed every year for the next several years depending on litter sizes and ability to place pups.
     
  5. cypher

    cypher Well-Known Member

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    I'm up for anything that work in getting otter pups. If only putting them together during breeding season has a better success rate than having them together all year around, let's go for it.

    Also, I know Indian Rhino Asha is due anytime between now and mid-end February, (cross your fingers for a healthy calf) but has there been any news on the White Rhinos? I know they're off exhibit now, but anyone heard anything of recent?
     
  6. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    I haven't heard anything regarding the white rhinos and a possible pregnancy but from what I heard in the fall chances were low. Tom would mount them but not actually preform the act necessary for pregnancy. I have heard that if Tom didn't get the job done this summer they would swap him for the more assertive and mature Tony. So I wont be surprised to hear come spring if Tony was with the girls full time or the boys were rotating time with the girls. They could always do a DNA test if they weren't sure who the sire was.
     
  7. cypher

    cypher Well-Known Member

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    Well that's not surprising. Last time I saw the White Rhinos out, Tom was doing exactly as you said. Mounting the girls but not actually breeding. I wondering if this is because he's not fully mature. If I recall correctly, he's under 10 years old, and I believe males don't mature until around age 10-12. Tony is at a mature age so he might be luckier in breeding. Alternating the boys seems interesting, but I wonder if that would actually work. OR would the girls be more confused about which male to mate with.
     
  8. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to potentially rotating the boys that was more of me just spit balling ideas rather than an actual plan. In theory it could prove useful. In the wild the girls would have some mate choice. They could mate with the bigger stronger male. Who knows. And for the guys if they could tell the other one had been with the girls the day before it might encourage them to be more assertive.

    Tom is 9, just had his birthday on the 4th, and Tony is 12, almost 13. Sabi is 6 and Zohari is 5 1/2, so they still are working on maturity themselves.
     
  9. cypher

    cypher Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing Tom is the more desirable male to breed compared to Tony?
     
  10. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    Yes Tom is the more genetically valuable of the boys. If I remember right one or both of his parents were imports. Tony is from captive born stock. In the case of the girls they both descend from South African imports and share a father. Their family has been pretty successful since arriving in the US. Spreading Tom's genetics is more important but Tony is a suitable replacement should Tom not be up to the task.
     
  11. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Tom is only just turned 9 this Jan. and Tony is 13+. I guess we can do the maths. It seems for now it would be better to breed from the more aged and experienced male.

    Tom may come on board when he is a little older and might sit better with the girls.

    Just my 50 cents.
     
  12. Jake.Roberts

    Jake.Roberts Well-Known Member

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    I'm beyond excited for Asha's calf! I just hope it's a smooth birth and we have a healthy mom and baby after!
     
  13. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  14. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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  15. arcticwolf

    arcticwolf Well-Known Member

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    I love when the zoo talks about some of the smaller births. I know that everyone loves the lion, polar bear and panda cubs (so do I), but I still appreciate learning about the babies of some of the less popular species. It's especially interesting that there are no male whiptail lizards, and I enjoyed reading the detailed explanation of how the females have babies in the newsletter. Thanks for sharing this! It looks like the year is off to a good start.
     
  16. cypher

    cypher Well-Known Member

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    I agree with arcticwolf. Learning about the births of species that are not seen as popular of interesting animals is always fun. It was an interesting read, that's for sure.
     
  17. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    It would be nice if the zoo publicized more of its successes. You are both right its great to hear about the popular babies but sometimes the less popular ones highlight the zoo's conservation successes. There is rarely any mention of the zoo'z work with black footed ferrets, Vancouver Island Marmots, Shrikes, Massassauga Rattlesnakes, just to mention some of the Canadian conservation successes. Forget some of the great work being done with non native species of fish, reptiles, amphibians and birds. Whenever there is a birth or hatching that is significant to the species I would love to see a press release once the survival of the offspring is more of a sure thing. Will the media care 90% of the time... no... but its a way to show people what they do when attacked for exploiting animals. They can turn and say look at what we have done and direct people to the press releases with the details. And for those of use who really care we get an opportunity to learn more about the species at the zoo and their conservation work.
     
  18. cypher

    cypher Well-Known Member

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    Couldn't have said it better myself.
     
  19. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  20. TZFan

    TZFan Well-Known Member

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    Elk, Megan, has died. She was 21. I didn't even know her name until she was gone... I need to work harder on my list. No elk names...