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Dallas World Aquarium Updated DWA Species List

Discussion in 'United States' started by jayjds2, 29 Dec 2018.

  1. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    This species list is current as of December 21, 2018.

    The Dallas World Aquarium has an ever-changing rotation of unique animals on exhibit. A species list was posted by @d1am0ndback but much has changed since then. I hope this thread will be used to keep a current list of species at the aquarium, and with the entire aquarium in one post, will be easier to update and maintain in the future. I unfortunately was not feeling too great on the day of my visit, and as such, I did not spend as much time in the aquarium as I normally would. Because of this, I did not record fish species for the most part, and those sections of my list have either been borrowed from the previous species list, or from the (admittedly outdated) website or guidebook. A few of the exhibits (especially in Borneo or the herps in Mundo Maya) may be out of order. I have corrected all of these issues to the best of my ability. Exhibits are by both major exhibit area and minor theme; bolded titles refer to the aquarium's five major exhibits (Borneo, Orinoco, Aquarium, South Africa, and Mundo Maya) and underlined portions refer to minor themes. For example, Toucan Terrace is composed of 6 individual exhibits so these exhibits are clumped together, with the first indicating this sub-exhibit, and spaced apart from the adjacent River and Flooded Forest exhibits.

    Borneo

    1. Green-naped pheasant pigeon, Red-tailed black cockatoo
    2. Lesser bird-of-paradise, Wompoo fruit dove
    3. Rhinoceros hornbill, Argus pheasant
    4. Great Indian hornbill, Victorian crowned pigeon
    5. Luzon bleeding heart, Bali mynah, Jambu fruit dove, Pesquet’s parrot
    6. Asian arowana, Australian lungfish
    7. Giant red-finned gourami, black marsh turtle
    8. Blyth’s hornbill, western crowned pigeon
    9. Matschie's tree kangaroo
    10. Palm cockatoo
    11. Shoebill, African green pigeon, red-billed pintail, great blue turaco, Fischer’s turaco
    12. Little blue penguin


    Orinoco

    1. (Above stairs) Blue-throated macaw

    2. Jungle Jewels: Guianan red cotinga, golden-headed manakin, red-capped manakin*, paradise tanager, blue-naped chlorophonia*, golden-collared manakin, northern swallow tanager, wattled jacana, scaled pigeon, little tinamou

    3. Free flight: scarlet-headed blackbird, red-rumped cacique, yellow-rumped cacique, green oropendola, crested oropendola, Venezuelan troupial, crimson-backed tanager, silver-beaked tanager, lemon-rumped tanager, red-crested cardinal, scarlet ibis, roseate spoonbill, green aracari, chestnut-eared aracari, crimson-rumped toucanet, motmot**, Puerto Rican woodpecker, Chiriqui quail-dove

    4. Jungle Junction: Toco toucan, pale-mandibled aracari, Panamanian boat-billed heron, yellow-crowned night heron, Montezuma oropendola, giant anteater

    5. Trogon Heights: black-tailed trogon, green-backed trogon, golden-headed quetzal, fiery-billed aracari, motmot**, ruddy quail-dove, purplish-backed quail-dove, purple-throated fruitcrow

    6. Monkey Island: White-faced saki monkey

    7. Pied tamarin (off show currently)

    8. Giant otter

    9. View of River: southern pochard, black-bellied whistling duck, Orinoco goose, rosy-billed pochard, Chiloé wigeon, ringed teal, Antillean manatee, fish (described later)

    10. Sloth Forest: Pygmy marmoset
    11. Black-necked aracari
    12. Brown-throated three-toed sloth
    13. Black-throated aracari, black-throated toucanet

    14. Howler Heights: Red howler monkey, northern helmeted curassow

    15. (below the visitor) Orinoco crocodile, fish (described later)

    16. Cotinga Corner: Scarlet cock-of-the-rock, Andean cock-of-the-rock, Guianan cock-of-the-rock, capuchinbird, long-wattled umbrellabird, nocturnal curassow, many-banded aracari

    17. Lobo del Rio: Giant otter (same exhibit as previous)

    18. The Cave: Amazon tree boa

    19. Lizard Cove: Northern caiman lizard

    20. Avian Trail: Plate-billed mountain toucan, fiery-billed aracari, blue-banded toucanet, wattled guan, golden lion tamarin
    21. Emerald tree boa
    22. Double yellow-headed amazon

    23. River’s Edge: green anaconda, black spiny-tailed iguana, discus, neon tetras, assorted fish

    24. Bats and Bugs: Cuvier’s dwarf caiman
    25. Fire leg tarantula
    26. Amazon poison dart frog
    27. Goliath bird-eating tarantula
    28. Vampire bat
    29. Red-tailed boa

    30. Crocodile Cove: Orinoco crocodile, black pacu, red-bellied piranha

    31. Flooded Forest: Aquatic caecilian
    32. Electric eel
    33. Brazilian yellow-head locale of dyeing poison frog
    34. Polkadot stingray, silver arowana, yellow-spotted Amazon River turtle, Llanos sideneck turtle

    35. Toucan Terrace: Versicolored barbet, ruddy quail-dove
    36. Razor-billed curassow, toco toucan
    37. Bigtooth river stingray, mata mata
    38. Wattled curassow, Hoffman’s two-toed sloth
    39. Curl-crested aracari, elegant-crested tinamou
    40. Golden-headed lion tamarin

    41. The River: Budgett’s frog
    42. Blue poison frog
    43. Antillean manatee, red-tailed catfish, fork-snouted catfish, giant arapaima, spotted shovel-nose catfish, polka dot stingray, Arrau turtle


    Aquarium

    44. Solomon Islands: Moon jelly
    45. Flashlight fish, splitfin flashlight fish, racoon butterflyfish, mystery wrasse

    46. Lord Howe Island: Wide-banded anemonefish, McCulloch's clownfish, comb wrasse, painted goldie, spectacled angelfish, bluestreak cleaner wrasse, green chromis

    47. Southern Australia: Pot-bellied seahorse
    48. Leafy sea dragon, weedy sea dragon, tasseled anglerfish

    49. Fiji: Spotted dragonet
    50. Cinnamon clownfish, lyretail anthias, pink skunk clownfish

    51. New Guinea: Blue assessor, yellow assessor, copperband butterflyfish, lawnmower blenny, yellow candy hogfish, blue hippo tang, emperor angelfish, green-spotted dragonet, mandarin dragonet, six line wrasse, percula clownfish, marginalis butterflyfish

    52. British Columbia: Giant pacific octopus, tiger rockfish
    53. Blackeye goby, tube snout, China rockfish, grunt sculpin, sailfin, monkeyface prickleback

    54. Sri Lanka: mitratus butterflyfish, weedy scorpionfish, Evan's anthias, Moorish idol, gem tang, powder blue tang, zebra angelfish

    55. Japan: Japanese spider crab, spot prawn, longspine snipefish
    56. Moorish idol, powder brown tang, blotchy anthias, wrought iron butterflyfish, Japanese angelfish, blue-lined angelfish, Japanese swallowtail angelfish, splendid garden eel, spotted garden eel

    57. Indonesia: Orange skunk clownfish, bellus lyretail angelfish, Banggai cardinalfish, bar goby, black ocellaris clownfish, aiptasia-eating filefish, chocolate surgeonfish, many-banded pipefish, blue assessor, fathead anthias, Pacific blue-striped pipefish, six line wrasse
    58. Pacific blue-striped pipefish, Janss' pipefish

    59. Continental Shelf: Napoleon wrasse, blue-spotted stingray, threadfin snapper, dragon wrasse, harlequin tuskfish, clown triggerfish, red-toothed triggerfish, unicorn tang (apologies, as this one is a bit lacking)

    South Africa

    60. Rock hyrax, eastern yellow-billed hornbill
    61. African black-footed penguin
    62. Madagascan giant day gecko, tomato frog
    63. Klemmer's day gecko
    64. Painted mantella
    65. Blue-bellied roller
    66. Madagascan big-headed turtle
    67. Radiated tortoise


    Mundo Maya

    68. River Delta: Brown basilisk
    69. Arboreal alligator lizard
    70. Hernandez’ helmeted basilisk
    71. Flame leg tarantula
    72. Yapok, jaguar cichlid, Jack Dempsey cichlid
    73. Axolotl

    74. Fishes of the Cenote: Blind cavefish

    75. Los Petennes: Desert cottontail, burrowing owl
    76. Eastern screech owl

    77. Cenote: Spotted moray eel, red lionfish
    78. Blacknose shark, sandbar shark, bonnethead shark, freshwater sawfish, goliath grouper, southern stingray, white-spotted guitarfish

    79. Marine Creatures: Flame cardinalfish, Clarion angelfish, longspine urchin, pencil urchin, blue chromis, brown chromis, rock urchin, blue-spotted jawfish, black cap basslet, scrawled filefish
    80. Grey angelfish, jewel damsel, blue angelfish, sergeant major damsel, reef butterflyfish, slippery dick, royal gramma, neon yellowhead wrasse, pencil urchin, beau gregory damsel, bluehead wrasse, blue tang, clown wrasse, Spanish hogfish, cherub angelfish, black durgon, blue chromis, brown chromis, harlequin bass
    81. Lined seahorse
    82. Urchin sp.
    83. Lined seahorse

    84. Serpent’s Den: Blue spiny lizard, Mexican leaf frog
    85. Terciopelo
    86. Eyelash viper
    87. Mexican beaded lizard
    88. Middle American rattlesnake

    89. House of Zotz: barred owl
    90. Seba’s short-tailed fruit bat
    91. Red-eyed tree frog
    92. Morelet’s crocodile
    93. Plumed basilisk
    94. Painted wood turtle
    95. Nicaraguan slider

    96. Free flight: Fulvous-crested tanager, red-legged honeycreeper, purple honeycreeper, Northern swallow tanager, yellow-green grosbeak, southern yellow grosbeak, spangled cotinga, blue dacnis, blue-necked tanager, burnished-buff tanager, motmot**, golden-headed manakin, Panamanian acorn woodpecker, Puerto Rican woodpecker, green-backed trogon, sparkling violetear, broad-billed hummingbird, rufous hummingbird, Anna’s hummingbird, Chiriqui quail-dove

    97. Caribbean Creatures: Lesser devil ray, spotted eagle ray

    98. (above the tank, against the wall) Guianan crested eagle

    99. Birds of El Triunfo: Spectacled owl
    100. Ornate hawk-eagle
    101. Harpy eagle

    102. Mayan Temple: Brazilian ocelot

    103. American flamingo

    104. Selva Maya: Spectacled owl, ocellated turkey, red-rumped agouti
    105. Black hawk-eagle

    106. Jabiru stork

    *I did not find these species on my visit and their presence is as-yet unconfirmed.

    **the species of motmot kept in US collections is at present unknown, and DWA in particular is tough to determine due to the unknown location from which some of their individuals were imported.

    Construction for the aquarium's newest exhibit has begun and is visible from Orinoco. No details have been released about what this exhibit will be.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 29 Dec 2018
  2. TinoPup

    TinoPup Well-Known Member

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    Fantastic job.
    Regarding the red-capped manakin in Jungle Jewels, I have a photo of one from July, if that makes a difference.
     
  3. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! I figure having an up-to-date list of species at DWA is of particular interest for many zoo enthusiasts, due to their unique lineup of species.

    I’m looking for confirmations of the manakin and chlorophonia from December. My local friends haven’t seen either lately and that’s unusual for both, and the keeper for that aviary was unhelpful in confirming or denying the presence of either.
     
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  4. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Does DWA still keep Horned Guan? I find it odd that the aquarium would make an El Trunifo themed exhibit without this species...
     
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  5. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, and they were formerly on exhibit in the harpy eagle exhibit before the eagles arrived at the aquarium. There are several exhibits in my opinion that would be suitable for the species, but I imagine they are off exhibit in hopes of breeding them.
     
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  6. Erythrogaster

    Erythrogaster Well-Known Member

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    They have successfully bred the horned guan.
     
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  7. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    When? That is rather challenging considering the aquarium only holds females.
     
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  8. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Quite the success, then :p
     
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  9. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Why would they be trying to breed them off exhibit if they only have females, then?
     
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  10. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    I didn’t think of that at the time. I really don’t know why they’re off exhibit, truth be told, that was just a suggestion. Perhaps they are waiting to receive a female for breeding.
     
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  11. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I suspect that a large number of motmots in US collections might be Amazonian; that being said, with the number of import events and lack of reliable location records I find it unlikely that all of them are the same species.
     
  12. Erythrogaster

    Erythrogaster Well-Known Member

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    The aquarium only holds females at present. The last male died in 2016.
    Two birds have been bred there - females - in 2013 and 2014.
     
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  13. TinoPup

    TinoPup Well-Known Member

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    I distinctly remember there being a lot of the red-capped ones, I had a hard time finding an orange-capped among all of them, so that's quite interesting for them all to suddenly no longer be there. Given the owner's reputation, I'm not surprised the keeper wasn't helpful, unfortunately :(
     
  14. d1am0ndback

    d1am0ndback Well-Known Member

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    By orange crown do you mean the golden collared manakin? At the time of your visit, every manakin in that enclosure but 2 were golden headed, while one was red capped, and the other was golden collared.

    Its a shame the keeper wasn't very helpful, but that is not at all what I have experienced when asking keepers at facility, with some of them having even gone out of their ways to find me something or call someone to find out about what I'm asking.

    When you speak of "The owners reputation" what are you referring too?
     
  15. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, like @d1am0ndback, I’m unsure quite what you meant by this? Every other keeper I spoke with went above and beyond to help me find the animals I was looking for, even going out of their way to walk with me to the exhibit I was having troubles with and spend time helping me find it. One keeper who I saw frequently throughout the day let me know if an exhibit was about to be fed even, so that I could manage better views/pictures. The keepers at DWA are by far some of the kindest individuals I’ve met when it comes to zookeepers, and really went out of their way to make sure I had a good visit.
     
  16. ericnielsenpdx

    ericnielsenpdx Well-Known Member

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    According to Facebook 12/19/2018 “So EXCITED about the new exhibit opening in mid 2019 here at the Dallas World Aquarium! Cloud Forest Trek is going to be a large expansion to the DWA Orinoco: Secret of the River Rainforest Exhibit. With over 5000 sq ft of new exhibit & venue space! Cannot wait to schedule tours with our future Daryl's By Design clients! Here is a peek!”
    #officialdwazoo #dwazoo #darylsbydesign #cloudforesttrek #newvenue #eventvenue #dwaevents #dwaweddings #dfwevents #dweddings

     
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  17. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    The name of the complex makes it sound like the quetzals will go on exhibit...
     
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  18. ericnielsenpdx

    ericnielsenpdx Well-Known Member

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    Yes it does...and Facebook post I have linked says a “New journey is coming soon” and the video they posted Does show a resplendent quetzel , so I am crossing my fingers : )



    Dallas World Aquarium
     
  19. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    The name, perhaps, but if you actually think about it it doesn’t. This complex is an extension of Orinoco, so geographically the quetzals do not make sense. And the aquarium is pretty accurate when it comes to having geographically correct exhibitry.
    If you have visited the aquarium, you will notice this is the same video as the one which plays on loop at the entrance aquarium- and has for years.
     
  20. drill

    drill Well-Known Member

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    1.Green-back trogon different from white-tailed trogon?
    2. No Shoebill or Jabiru?
    3. No other tinamou or hummingbird species?
    4. Yapok?
    5. Any other quetzals left?