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Which venomous mammal interests you most: the solenodon or the loris ? (poll)

Discussion in 'Zoo Cafe' started by Onychorhynchus coronatus, 10 Oct 2020.

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Which venomous mammal interests you most: the solenodon or the loris ?

Poll closed 24 Oct 2020.
  1. Solenodon

    10 vote(s)
    47.6%
  2. Loris

    11 vote(s)
    52.4%
  1. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I was doing a bit of reading on venom in mammals earlier (a topic that fascinates me) and thought it would be interesting to create a poll for zoochatters to vote for the venomous mammal which interests them the most : the solenodon or the loris.

    Please also feel free to write comments regarding why you made the choice and why the species interests you more.

    Thanks !

    Look forward to seeing the results!
     
    Last edited: 10 Oct 2020
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  2. CheeseChameleon1945

    CheeseChameleon1945 Well-Known Member

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    This is a hard one, I don't really know what I find more interesting. Cuban solenedons are such an interesting animal, and when I mention one to someone they are just scratching their heads. And not just Cuban solenedons, Hatian solenedons are pretty cool too. Just think Cubans are a little more interesting. I think the hard thing about this poll though is that while comparing something like a loris and a tarsier, which are a little more closely related was kinda more simple to figure out, these are 2 pretty different species, which makes it hard to narrow it down. I do appreciate a challenge though, so no biggie! As I stated before, I really like lorises and are some of my favorite primates! But I also like solenedons and insectivores in general so that's also pretty hard. I think what intrigues me the most about solenedons are their venom, of course, but also their native range. I have a particular fondness for the Caribbean and the islands surrounding it, since they have some pretty cool and unique species there, but that's just my own bias. I also like Lorises because of their venom, but mostly their looks. Such adorableness in an animal is pretty high in my ratings of animals, and I can't fault that for any other primate. But this is hard, and I have to make a decision, so I would say the Lorises, simply because of the wonder that invoked me to study this species, and I can't deny that they are pretty darn fascinating, so I would have to say, the loris. And I'm glad your into venomous animals @Onychorhynchus coronatus, since I think a lot of these types of animals get a bad rap for having venom.
     
  3. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the comment !

    Yes, I agree, its a challenging one but I always think the answers to these sorts of questions are pretty interesting.

    I really want people to take a moment to think hard about these unusual animals and if possible to articulate what they find interesting about them so I thought I'd create a poll for this.

    I do love lorises and as they are a primate (and a venomous primate at that) I find them particularly interesting but I personally voted for the Solenodon because as a far more ancient mammal and an enduring interest of mine I find it more interesting.

    Of course I love venomous animals in general but I find the venomous mammals perhaps more interesting then the snakes, spiders, scorpions and lizards because of how rare this ability is.
     
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  4. CheeseChameleon1945

    CheeseChameleon1945 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I enjoy a little challenge. I think something like what's your favorite subspecies of tiger would be a little to easy, so I find it nice that you are asking more challenging questions. Solenedons are ancient animals, and I think not only their natural history is interesting but I also like their their history of discovery too, some very interesting stories were told about these couple of species. And Yes I think It is a little more interesting to see something like a mammal to have venom and not a scorpion or snake or a spider, particularly because it's a lot more common amongst animals like those, and these venomous mammals are unique in that way, that's why it peeks a lot more of the general public's interest.
     
  5. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, tigers and charismatic megafauna are not really my thing anyway.

    What stories have you heard told of the two solenodon species ? I'm curious.

    I think in terms of the general public the loris is always going to win out over the solenodon due to it outperforming in the looks / cute department.

    However, I'm glad to hear that in the Dominican Republic there is an increasing public awareness and pride in these endemic mammals which is very encouraging to hear. :)
     
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  6. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Voting for solenodon but I think Platypus is my number one pick.
     
  7. CheeseChameleon1945

    CheeseChameleon1945 Well-Known Member

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    I remember my grandfather telling me about a friend who was actually in the Dominican Repulblic, and found a Haitian solenedon dead. However next to it he also saw a rat dead. The friend had no Idea what happened, and told my grandfather. Presumably I thought that the Haitian solenedon was killed of by a feral dog, which were introduced in these areas to kill the supposed "pests" that were solenedons. But he told me that the solenedon showed no sign of a wound from a dog. After that, I'm not sure what happened. I don't think he really thought much of it, but I still find it interesting to this day, and I am personally intrigued by the rat next to it. If your wondering they were on the Dominican republic, so I'm pretty sure they were Hatian solenedons. Also, I think the first reports from the scientists who studied these animals are just generally interesting. Nothing special, but I think it would be cool to be the first person to study it.
     
  8. CheeseChameleon1945

    CheeseChameleon1945 Well-Known Member

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    Nice. Platypuses are pretty remarkable, so I wouldn't be surprised if @Onychorhynchus coronatus would make another poll with another venomous mammal. Just a thought!
     
  9. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    (c) Various shrew species (Blarina sp., Neomys sp.)
    (d) The aforementioned male platypus
    (e) The African crested rat
    (f) Vampire bats
    ...
    It's hard to choose... ;)
     
  10. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Of course there are many more examples of venomous mammals that I could have included in the poll.

    However, the reasoning behind the loris and the solenodon is due to this family and subfamily both being comprised of numerous EDGE species that are of conservation concern. :p

    Though I am starting to think that I could have included the platypus as this is both venomous and a "Near threatened" species. :confused:
     
  11. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmm, that is quite a strange story, presumably both had been poisoned.

    Well, the dogs were not specifically introduced to Hispaniola to control pests in agricultural crops and things like that but rather were brought there as companion, guarding, fighting, tracking (to track down indigenous peoples instituting rebellions and escaped slaves) and working animals early on during the Spanish (and French in the case of Haiti) colonial rule. Domestic cats were also introduced early on as both pets and to control pests but as with the dog very quickly began to form feral populations.

    However, the Javan mongoose was indeed specifically introduced to the island (and many others besides) during the 19th century to try to control the population of invasive rodents that fed upon important crops like sugarcane.

    Yes, actually only the Hispaniolan solenodon (solenodon paradoxus) occurs on the island of Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti) so it would have been this species. The Cuban solenodon (Solenodon cubanus) as the name suggests is endemic only to the neighbouring island nation of Cuba.
     
    Last edited: 11 Oct 2020
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  12. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Not that many, if you think about it. At least if including the confirmed ones.
     
  13. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    But I agree many more than the solenodons and lorises :p anyway you should pay close attention to this poll as it will indicate the most suitable future venomous mammal species for your zoo. ;) :p
     
  14. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Given the popularity of the platypus among zoo nerds outside of Oz, I can already guess the final result. Which, like most of the options, is beyond any reality. At the moment, I'm more interested in building a suitable tank for a Naja siamensis and curing a sickly Rio Fuente Beaded lizard. And in the long run, I'm looking for a larger venue to expand my business.
     
  15. CheeseChameleon1945

    CheeseChameleon1945 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I did know Javan mongooses were introduced, but I guess I hadn't thought of that. But thanks for the very helpful information. The story took place actually in the 1960's if you were wondering. But that's pretty much all I know. The story is pretty vague, but when I see my grandfather again I'll ask him. Also, Javan mongoose might be something of interest in an ooz meard.;)
     
    Last edited: 11 Oct 2020
  16. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Was this friend of your grandfathers a soldier by any chance ?
     
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  17. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that is partly why I'm glad I didn't include the platypus in the poll, it would have inevitably won hands down.

    Surely you wouldn't say no to a loris or a solenodon eventually though ?

    What is wrong with the Rio Fuended beaded lizard ?
     
  18. CheeseChameleon1945

    CheeseChameleon1945 Well-Known Member

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    I don't remember. He might have been. Again, I'll have to ask my grandfather again.
     
  19. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Apart from the VERY unlikely case that a high-ranking relevant Cuban or Haitian stakeholder suddenly had the desperate urge to donate a specimen directly to me, chances are very, very slim for me to obtain any solenodons. Slower loris are more likely to be available, but confiscated specimens usually end up in EAZA zoos ( and I'm still trying to get into the OÖZ first). I'm already having a hard time trying to persuade any European NHM to lend me a mounted specimen of solenodons, loris, pitohuis etc., as they're quite possessive. ;) I prefer to stay down-to-earth over building castles in the sky.
    As for the Beaded lizard: chronic anorexia and anemia. But she's started to eat quail eggs two days ago.
     
  20. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the chances are unfortunately quite slim of that happening at the moment, I agree.

    Nevertheless, the Hispaniolan species is a lot more numerous than previously thought and there is the beginnings of a captive breeding programe at ZOODOM in Santo Domingo. In the future the solenodon could become more widely available for zoos (I know that it is quite unlikely but just trying to be optimistic) who knows ?

    It doesn't suprise me that you are encountering a bit of resistance in obtaining a loan of a mounted solenodon specimen as I dont think there can even be that many out there, can there ? I mean I have visited quite a few natural history museums in Europe and I haven't yet seen a specimen of a solenodon.

    Hope the beaded lizard gets well soon, good sign that she is eating again though so hopefully she is getting her strength back. ;)