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Why are zebras so agressive

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by tigris115, 1 Jan 2017.

  1. Giant Panda

    Giant Panda Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Infanticidal males don't need to understand heredity, or even act consciously, for "when you take over a herd, kill existing offspring" to be selected for.
     
  2. dean

    dean Well-Known Member

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    [QUOTE
    *I'm reminded of dogs and the colours that they can and can't see easily and how a red ball in grass apparently looks very similar in shade; thus a dog might miss a red ball; meanwhile a blue ball in grass stands out a lot more because they can tell those two colours apart. However from our perspective the dog is just being daft when it can't see the clearly obvious red ball. (note colours in this example might not be correct; the theory is but the specific colours might be different in actuality).
    .[/QUOTE]
    I once had a dog, I found her in the local park where i doing my horticultural apprenticeship.One night she followed me home despite being locked in a shed overnight and not knowing where i was, so my parents decided we could keep her until after the comming Christmas. A few months on she went around the garden biting all the heads of all the yellow tulips I had planted, and only the yellow ones. I have often wondered why, they where different varieties etc the only common denominator was the colour. Sadly she then moved on to doing the same thing to a neighbours chickens and she had to go.
     
  3. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    I've seen zebras with ostriches and giraffes but nothing else.
     
  4. csura999

    csura999 Active Member

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    The Milwaukee County Zoo keeps their zebras in a mixed habitat with greater kudu, waterbucks, and a marabou stork. The exhibit at one point also held giant eland and an ostrich as well with them.

    I remember a keeper telling me years ago, that the zebras definitely could be fiery.
     
  5. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Zebras do well with white rhinos at the Cotswolds. They seem to mix with ostrich and gazelle unproblematically as well, but not always with antelope.

    I'm imagining the quagga would have been more amenable because they seem to have become tamer more easily. Opportunity lost.
     
  6. zoogiraffe

    zoogiraffe Well-Known Member

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    No they don't it went wrong when they started to bred the White Rhino,and the Zebra are now in the old Blackbuck enclosure!!
     
  7. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Which way was the aggression?
     
  8. zoogiraffe

    zoogiraffe Well-Known Member

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    Zebras attacking the rhino calfs. For the record they have been split for over 2 years.
     
  9. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    Quagga was simply the southernmost form of Plains zebra, so would have possessed exactly (or very closely) the same behaviour and temperament. I think reference to 'taming' them can equally apply to other races of plains zebra which have on occassion been trained to pull carts or broken to the saddle. But as a potentially better mixer with other species I see no difference.
     
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