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Why so much illegal wildlife trade gets through US Customs

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by DavidBrown, 18 Oct 2014.

  1. DavidBrown

    DavidBrown Moderator Staff Member

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  2. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

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    And I imagine the majority of them aren't trained in wildlife.

    :p

    Hix
     
  3. dean

    dean Well-Known Member

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    The more I read items such as this the more I despair for the natural world, if it isn't hunted for bush meat, and trophies it is killed for it's environment, as man needs land for his own food. The human population is out of control and the creatures that share our planet seam to be doomed. And still Anml R groups want to close animal collections, and send the animals - I assume- back to the 'wild'.
     
  4. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

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    Apparently, if it dies in the wild it's OK, because it died a 'free' animal. Which is preferable to life in captivity.

    :p

    Hix
     
  5. Buldeo

    Buldeo Well-Known Member

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    Good article.

    Richard Conniff had a piece on his Strange Behaviors blog recently about a pair of mobile phone applications designed to help cops spot illegal animals and animal parts. Apparently the United States' fighting personnel are eager to participate in the illegal wildlife trade.


    Full post here.
     
  6. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

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    I made the above statement last week, when I was in Africa. Due to dodgy wifi I wasn't able to download the article at the time.

    Having just read it now I can see my assumption was wrong - the teams involved are obviously well-trained. I wasn't aware the article was about teams that specifically look for illegal wildlife shipments.

    As such, I retract my above statement as it is clearly incorrect in this case.

    :p

    Hix