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Zoo Animals Well-Represented & More-Numerous in America, but not in/than in, Europe

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Nikola Chavkosk, 31 Dec 2016.

  1. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Another animal that is not present in European zoos is Geoffrey's spider monkey (CR EN species), but AFAIK this species is present and breeding in U.S. zoos? Anybody can confirm this and inform us how many zoos in U.S. (and eventualy in Mexico and Canada) holds this species?

    This species was also managed in Australasian region, I think this was the species of spider monkey present in Auckland Zoo in New Zealand (I will check this).
     
  2. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Incorrect; ten collections in Europe and Israel hold non-subspecific A. geoffroyi with a handful breeding the species.

    Moreover, several collections hold pure subspecies; yucatanensis is held at Poznan Nowe, nominate is held at Kefar-Daniel, vellerosus is held at Prague, Zlin and Hai Park and breeds at the first of these, and ornatus is held at Chemnitz, Pont-Scorff, Peaugres and Jurques.
     
  3. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Am not at clear, I proivided this info from ZTL - where it is listed only one (Israeli) holder of Ateles geoffroyi geoffroyi . I am not very familliar with subspecific classification of these beautifull NW monkeys, I'll must research this.

    Edited after 2 minutes:
    Forget this, You are totaly right I dissmissed the other listing of no-subspecific status. Thank you TLD.

    I had some impression that one spider monkey species is quite well-represented in USA but not in Europe, do you know for any such?
     
  4. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    I answered this incorrectly, my apologies. It was actually 8 at the time (I'd forgotten Fort Worth) but is now at least 9, with Bronx.
     
  5. wayne4swfc

    wayne4swfc Well-Known Member

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    I too would argue that Europe has a surprisingly good collection with the UK letting the side down. I do often wonder if a collection (probabaly a theme park) really spent a good couple of million on a top, top dolphin exhibit how much it would attract the public, I think they'd be a great deal of people go to see them despite any protests.
     
  6. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I missed this question, @Nikola Chavkosk. Yes, Geoffroy's spider monkeys are present and breeding in US zoos. They are split between 2 populations: a smaller, pure Mexican population (A. g. vellerosus/yucatanensis) and a larger generic population. As of 3 years ago, there were 9 zoos holding the former and 41 zoos holding the latter, with 3 zoos holding both.

    Yes, Geoffroy's. For other managed species (fusciceps, hybridus, and paniscus), Europe has more.
     
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  7. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

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    More species to add to the list: Bolivian grey titi, Panamanian golden frog, multiple species of duiker, gerenuk, klipspringer, babirusa (ironic because NA's founders were initially imported from Europe), Sichuan takin, boat-billed heron, southern hairy-nosed wombat, Francois' langur, Angolan colobus, a few African monkeys, Chinese red panda, spotted-necked otter, and probably quite a few species of turtle/tortoise.
     
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  8. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Thank you a lot Coelacanth18!
    Whether this means that Nepalese red panda is not present in the U.S. (although I can't spot an obvious difference between the two)?
    I suppose one of such African monkeys, is the wolf guenon (Cercopithecus wolfi) - I saw it in a picture from the San Diego Zoo (and on Wikipedia at Henry Doorly Zoo - is this wide-spread species in the U.S. zoos?)
     
    Last edited: 2 May 2017
  9. DDcorvus

    DDcorvus Well-Known Member

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    The European population is smaller than the US one, but it is a stable population with between 35 to 40 animals. The US population is twice the size.
     
  10. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    Both subspecies are present in the US, and to me, Nepalese has always looked a bit darker.
    Wolf's mona monkey is not really widespread, but it seems to be the most common Cercopithecus that I've seen. There are several smaller populations of a few members of the genus.
     
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  11. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that info @DDcorvus. I didn't know any population specifics, I just estimated from the number of holding facilities on ZTL that it was a smaller population. Has the population expanded/been expanding recently? It seems like the majority of holders have only acquired them in the last 10 years or so.

    The most common Cercopithecus species in North America is De Brazza's monkey (~60). Besides Wolf's guenon, other species from the genus that are bred here are red-tailed monkey (C. ascanius), and Diana monkey (C. diana). All 3 of those species number ~30 individuals each.

    I thought that we also bred lesser spot-nosed monkey (C. petaurista), but apparently there is no breeding program for them anymore so I'm not sure. Maybe they're being phased out now; makes sense, considering how small their population is. There are a couple of other species that will go ghost in the near future; a handful of blue monkeys (C. mitis), for instance.