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Zoo animals you want to see but haven't yet

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Meaghan Edwards, 5 Nov 2008.

  1. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    the raccoon is in keeper talks at the River Safari. I think. Unless she has moved.
     
  2. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh right, well I missed it there as well! The keeper talks I saw there just featured an African grey and a pygmy hedgehog.
     
  3. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    If only Sumatran rhinos had mushroomed in zoos like Red River Hogs have....

    I totted up the species on the main wish list which I haven't seen which was easier, they are;

    1.Giant Forest Hog.
    2. Saiga
    3.Hoatzin
    4.Whale Shark
    5.Javan rhino
    6.G.W.Shark
    7.Beluga
    8.River Dolphin
    9.Giant Armadillo
    10.Orinoco Crocodile
    11.Yapok
    12.Marine Iguana
    13.Emperor Penguin
    14.Snub-nosed Monkey
    15. Crab-eating Raccoon.
    16.(and most regrettably) Thylacine.

    Plus a 'don't know'-Jentink's Duiker.

    So 42 or 43 species seen is my total.

    The (extant) species I 'would most like to see' still remains Spix Macaw. How many people have seen that?- I believe Vogelcommando is one.
     
  4. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Of the sixty animals featured on the list provided by "Dassie Rat" I have been lucky enough to see forty-six.

    Javan rhinoceros and thylacine are definitely the two on that list that I most want to see although I appreciate, obviously, that will never happen.

    Three species, that don't feature on the list, that I am very eager to see are

    • chiru
    • mountain nyala
    • African water chevrotain
     
    Last edited: 24 Jul 2016
  5. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    Hello Tim

    I had a chat with a mutual Zoochatter friend last night and he also chose the mountain nyala.
     
  6. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    If you ever get back over to Germany, a trip to Wildpark Scwartze-Berge will entail surefire European Badgers :) as I shall discuss when I eventually start writing about my most recent trip.

    I believe he has actually worked with the species, and so took it for granted that he never bothered taking a photograph of the taxon :p
     
  7. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    There are very few photos around of the Spix at Vogelpark Walsrode, or any of the ones that were kept- sometimes semi-illegally, in the UK or elsewhere in Europe, perhaps for obvious reasons. One of the Walsrode pair was, I believe, kept by Harry Sissens in the UK during the 1970's before going to Germany, and I have seen just a couple of poor quality photos of that one.
     
  8. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    For those two you want The British Wildlife Centre.

    Does anyone know if they have they managed to get some new moles yet?
     
  9. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    What Laughing Dove means is, does the British Wildlife Centre have a mole?
     
  10. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    The reason I phrased that in a slightly odd way is that when I visited just under a year ago they did not have any moles but they usually do and there was a sign on the mole enclosure saying they would be getting a mole soon, or words to that effect.

    I suspect they may have a mole by now which would mean that collection has both mole and badger, the only place that I can think of with both.
     
  11. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    The last time I went to Berlin Zoo, there was a notice by some mole hills. Shepreth mentioned moles in its pygmy slow loris, but I never saw them.
     
  12. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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  13. temp

    temp Well-Known Member

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    An aquarium wouldn't need a pressurized tank to keep a coelacanth. Species kept from within its depth range, to 2-300 meter, generally do perfectly fine in cold and dark aquariums if brought up slowly to allow them to release pressure from their swim bladder. The limit is still being pushed, too. Both coelacanth species regularly occurs shallower than 200 m and at least the African species is regular close to 100 m, as evident by the population off Sodwana Bay in South Africa.

    Quite some years ago a large Japanese aquarium made a serious attempt of getting the African species for display, which would have been in their deep sea tank (cold and dark, but no pressure). After failing for a long period they stopped, citing both their initial lack of success in catching one and the ethics of bringing up a species that was pretty rare. Since then Japanese aquariums have been heavily involved in wild coelacanth research, but none have attempted to catch one for an aquarium.

    It's not clear where the "pressure limit" (fish requiring pressurized tank) begins, but it's much deeper the 1-200 meter depth limit for the coelacanth. Additionally, when aquariums start getting to the really deep water, much deeper than coelacanth, oxygen may be a big problem. Some years ago Monterey Bay failed at keeping certain very deep water invertebrates, speculating that they were particularly vulnerable to high oxygen levels (deep ocean generally contains much less oxygen than the ocean close to the surface).

    Just for the record, this tank was built by French researches for Oceanopolis in France. Although the exhibit is "travelling" in theory, so far it hasn't been put up anywhere else. There are no immediate plans of changing that, but it would definitely be cool if this sort of tanks started spreading.
     
  14. Zoolover1020

    Zoolover1020 Active Member

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    My List is:

    Prairie dog
    Bush dog
    Nilgai
    Kudu
    African leopard
    Shoebill stork
    Crab eating fox
    Crab eating raccoon
    Giant otter
    Swordfish
    Sumatran rhino
    Saola
    Echidna
    Secretary Bird
    Sika deer
    Mouflon
    Slow loris
    Serval
    Takin
    Hyena
    Rock hyrax
    Fennec fox
    Corsac foxe
     
  15. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    Hello zoolover1020
    I would like to see a saola and the swordfish has the X Factor, even if it's just for its generic name.
     
  16. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    I'd really like to see a sword/sailfish of some kind, but sadly, there aren't any in captivity right now that I know of. There were three in one aquarium in Japan (and they actually bred there) but all were released or died after a tsunami hit the aquarium.
     
  17. temp

    temp Well-Known Member

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    No species of billfish (swordfish, marlin, sailfish) has been bred in captivity; they did not breed at Fukushima. However, tunas have been bred in captivity at another Japanese aquarium and for the food industry. The breeding behaviors of tuna and billfish are quite similar, and it is entirely reasonable to assume that if it can be done with one, it can be done with the other using similar techniques. In recent years several large aquarium in Japan, China and Singapore have expressed interest in keeping billfish, but we'll see. Certainly a spectacular group of fish and one that likely could attract interest from "ordinary" aquarium visitors, not just hardcore fish fans.
     
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  18. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    @temp thanks for that clarification. I thought it said somewhere on their website that they had bred, but perhaps I read incorrectly or the translation was wrong. It will be interesting to see what the future holds for tuna and billfish alike in captivity. I enjoyed seeing tuna at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Sadly, they didn't have an ocean sunfish (something I'd very much like to see) at the time, but now they have two.
     
  19. Teddy Dalton

    Teddy Dalton Well-Known Member

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    Having now seen clouded leopards, white tigers and komodo dragons, I would now like to see golden tabby and snow tigers, king cheetahs and hybrid big cats (ligers etc)
     
  20. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys! Do many of you remember this old thread? From time to time, I visit my list of wishes for daydream, hehe. Maybe other people here do the same? Anyway, I think that after visiting many zoos in the three last years, the wish list is a bit obsolete. Also, if you remember well, my list is almost obscenely extensive, haha (but really all of them were animals that I would like to see and never sawn!) So I made two purposes: to list here the species previously listed that I already saw now, and to resume a looot my wish list excluding all those species that would not give me goosebumps of exthasis for be seen (what a difficult critter to choose species!). So here is my updating:

    Species previously listed in my wish list, but now happily seen and mostly photographed:

    MAMMALS
    Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus)
    Asian golden cat (Catopuma temminckii)
    Boto (Inia geoffrensis)
    Cape rock hyrax (Procavia capensis)
    Eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) (but horribly photographed, rolled and sleeping)
    European beaver (Castor fiber)
    European mink (Mustela lutreola) (same than quoll)
    Fennec (Vulpes zerda)
    Gerenuk (Litocranius walleri)
    Giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis)
    Javan lutung (Trachypithecus auratus)
    Kirk's dik-dik (Madoqua kirkii)
    Lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis)
    Northern Luzon giant cloud rat (Phloeomys pallidus)
    Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)
    Red-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus)
    Sea otter (Enhydra lutris)
    Tufted deer (Elaphodus cephalophus)
    White-faced saki (Pithecia pithecia)

    BIRDS
    African olive pigeon (Columba arquatrix)
    African pygmy goose (Nettapus auritus)
    Andean cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruviana)
    Baikal teal (Anas formosa)
    Bald ibis (Geronticus calvus)
    Bateleur (Terathopius ecaudatus)
    Blue coua (Coua caerulea)
    Blue-winged minla (Minla cyanouroptera)
    Blue-naped mousebird (Colius macrourus)
    Blyth's tragopan (Tragopan blythii)
    Capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor)
    Collared imperial pigeon (Ducula mullerii)
    Crested coua (Coua cristata)
    Curl-crested aracari (Pteroglossus beauharnaesii)
    Egyptian plover (Pluvianus aegyptius)
    Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri)
    Fire-tufted barbet (Psilopogon pyrolophus) (sadly with low light and the photo was horribly blurry)
    Golden-breasted starling (Cosmopsarus regius)
    Golden-crested myna (Ampeliceps coronatus)
    Guianan cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola rupicola)
    Guianan toucanet (Selenidera piperivora)
    Horned parakeet (Eunymphicus cornutus)
    Inca tern (Larosterna inca)
    Kori bustard (Ardeotis kori)
    Maroon shining parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis)
    Micronesian kingfisher (Halcyon cinnamomina)
    Oriental dollarbird (Eurystomus orientalis)
    Ornate hawk-eagle (Spizaetus ornatus)
    Pesquet's parrot (Psittrichias fulgidus)
    Plate-billed mountain toucan (Andigena laminirostris)
    Plumed whistling duck (Dendrocygna eytoni)
    Red-capped parrot (Purpureicephalus spurius)
    Red-knobbed hornbill (Aceros cassidix)
    Silver teal (Anas versicolor)
    Spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) (sadly a female)
    Spur-winged goose (Plectropterus gambensis)
    Superb bird of paradise (Lophorina superba)
    Thick-billed parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha)
    Tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata)
    Vermilion flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (sadly a female)
    White-backed duck (Thalassornis leuconotus)
    White-crested turaco (Tauraco leucolophus)
    White-headed duck (Oxyura leucocephala)
    White-necked jacobin (Floriuga mellivora)
    White-tailed trogon (Trogon viridis)
    Wompoo fruit dove (Ptilinopus magnificus)

    REPTILES:
    Bamboo ratsnake (Elaphe porphyracea)
    Casque-headed lizard (Corytophanes cristatus)
    Flying gecko (Ptychozoon kuhli)
    Long-tailed grass lizard (Takydromus sexlineatus)
    Mangshan pit viper (Protobothrops mangshanensis)
    Narrow-headed softshell turtle (Chitra indica)
    Parson's chameleon (Calumma parsonii)
    Satanic leaf gecko (Uroplatus phantasticus)
    Tentacled snake (Erpeton tentaculatum) (sadly not photographed)

    AMPHIBIANS:
    Iranian harlequin newt (Neurergus kaiseri)
    Tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum)
    Vietnamese mossy frog (Theloderma corticale)

    BONY FISHES:
    Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri)
    California sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher)
    Catalina goby (Lythrypnus dalli)
    Empire gudgeon (Hypseleotris compressa)
    Flagtail characin (Semaprochilodus insignis)
    Flying gurnard (Dactylopterus volitans)
    Freshwater minnow (Zacco platypus)
    Garibaldi (Hypsypops rubicundus)
    Green coral goby (Gobiodon histrio) (but horribly photographed)
    Little dragonfish (Eurypegasus draconis)
    Orange-lined triggerfish (Balistapus undulatus)
    Pyramid butterflyfish (Hemitaurichthys polylepis)
    Rachov's killi (Nothobranchius rachovii)
    Rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum)
    Reef triggerfish (Rhinecanthus rectangulus)
    Ribboned sea dragon (Haliichthys taeniophorus)
    Sarcastic fringehead (Neoclinus blanchardi)
    Starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus)
    Stripey (Microcanthus strigatus)
    Two-spot goby (Signigobius biocellatus)
    White-spotted boxfish (Ostracion meleagris)
    Yellow goatfish (Parupeneus cyclostomus) (sadly not yellow)
    Zebra pleco (Hypancistrus zebra)

    CARTILAGINOUS FISHES:
    Coral catshark (Atelomycterus marmoratus)
    Epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum)
    Leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata)
    Ribbon-tailed sting ray (Taeniura lymma)
    White-spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari)
    Zebra shark (Stegostoma fasciatum)

    URCHINS:
    Blue tuxedo urchin (Mespilia globulus)
    Whorl-spined urchin (Plococidaris verticillata)

    BRITTLESTARS:
    Zebra brittle star (Ophiolepis superba)

    STARFISHES:
    Sunflower starfish (Pycnopodia helianthoides)

    CEPHALOPODS:
    California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides)
    Flamboyant cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi)
    Pacific giant octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    SNAILS:
    Chestnut cowrie (Cypraea spadicea)
    Colombian ramshorn snail (Marisa cornuarietis)
    Giant keyhole limpet (Megathura crenulata)
    Lettuce slug (Elysia crispata)
    Spiny trumpet shell (Thiara cancellata)
    Variable headshield slug (Chelidonura varians)

    INSECTS:
    Fern walking stick (Oreophoetes peruana)
    Madagascar spiny stick insect (Achrioptera fallax)
    Rainbow stag beetle (Phalacrognathus muelleri)
    Sunburst diving beetle (Thermonectus marmoratus)
    Suraka silk moth (Antherina suraka)

    CRUSTACEANS:
    Anemone porcelain crab (Neopetrolisthes maculatus)
    Electric blue hermit crab (Calcinus elegans)
    Harlequin shrimp (Hymenocera elegans)
    Peacock-tailed anemone shrimp (Periclimenes brevicarpalis)
    Pom pom crab (Lybia tessellata)

    ARACHNIDS:
    Gooty sapphire spider (Poecilotheria metallica)
    Zebra spider (Viridasius fasciatus)

    Well, it has gone late! Tomorrow I will pust the wished ones.
     
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