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Zoo or living Encyclopedia?

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by SealPup, 12 Aug 2017.

  1. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Let's think about re-imagining lakeland wildlife oasis as a concept, with a bigger budget, as a large indoor collection.

    Part 1: geology and the solar system explained and something like the micrarium at Artis for microlife. There is no need for anything too in depth about the cosmos, just the geological background of the modern earth and information about the solar system, followed by the microscopic origins of life itself.

    Part 2: the ocean with an emphasis on invertebrate phyla and the origins of fishes. Kelp forest, seagrass bed and coral reef. Nautilus. Hagfish. Epaulette shark. Lots of Ediacaran and Cambrian fossils displayed.

    Part 3: the colonisation of the land, with air breathing fishes, amphibians, snails, leeches, scorpions, spiders, myriapods, land crabs and horseshoe crabs. Lots of fossils of coal swamp plants displayed.

    Part 4: the age of Sauropsids, with an aviary for medium sized birds and podocnemid river turtles and lizards (basilisks, Fiji iguanas) sharing the free roam. Essentially a big lory landing, though with crowned pigeons, turacos etc. Terraria for snakes including venomous species. Thrigby swamp house type exhibit for crocodilians. Sea turtle aquarium for green and loggerhead turtles. Penguin aquarium for Humboldt's penguin. Fossils of dinosaurs, pterosaurs, sea reptiles etc. Ends by fossils of Permian theropsids on the line to mammals so as to lead to part 5.

    Part 5: the age of Mammals represented by a nocturnal house as at Roundhay, and a bat flight for phyllostomids. A walk around tropical exhibit houses sloths, tamanduas, cuscuses, Brazilian and brush tailed porcupines, lemurs and NW monkeys. The emphasis upon the primates brings the age of mammals to the age of man, with early stone tools displayed and those of Oldovaian man compared to those of capuchins.

    Part 6: the age of man, with archaeological and ethnographic exhibits, and explanations of species extinction ie. dodo, aepyornis and moa skeletons. Again its not a complete ethnographic museum, its an introduction to concepts such as food production and social heirarchy and how technologies and people adapt to and shape environments, with references to mostly primitive technologies.
     
  2. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    ...so - another version of Rostock's Darwineum.
     
  3. lintworm

    lintworm Moderator Staff Member

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    Or the now deceased Biochron in Emmen, which did exactly the same but then over 30 years ago...
     
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  4. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Maybe: the LWO was inspired by the Biochron, as was the Geochron at Dudley. Whereas visitors walked through Emmen's biochron, people enjoy the low budget zoo in Cumbria. This is the same concept expanded slightly, with a larger budget.

    The Soviets had an idea for a living encyclopedia that was never really realised. This is a living encyclopedia.