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ZooChat Challenge Global 2020

Discussion in 'Challenges, Quizzes, Competitions & Games' started by ThylacineAlive, 1 Jan 2020.

  1. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

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    Welcome back everybody to the eighth installment of the ZooChat Global Challenge! We're heading into the uncharted territory of a new decade and with that I decided to really think outside of the box this year and by that I mean I decided to give you all the one thing you never thought I'd do: Marsupials.

    Now this year is going to play out a tad bit different since it's pretty obvious the Australians have this one in the bag. In order to keep this game entertaining for all parities, I've decided to introduce sub-competitions. For this year, the sub-competition winners will be simply split between Australasia and the rest of the world. So how this will work is that, as always, the person who sees the most marsupials by the end of the year will be crowned the global winner, regardless of region or areas of travel. However, I will also be crowning secondary winners: the person who sees the most marsupials within Australasia without exiting the region, and the person who sees the most marsupials outside of Australasia without entering the region.

    Now I realize the person who sees with most within Australasia will likely be the same person who wins the entire challenge, and if that's how it goes so be it, but there is always a chance that one of you may do an Australia tour while also visiting zoos withing your own area of the world so I figured I'd keep an opening for that just in case. For the purposes of this challenge, the Weber Line will be used to separate Australasia from Southeast Asia. New Zealand, New Caledonia, and the Solomon Islands are all included in Australasia along with Australia and New Guinea even though there won't be many, if any additions from those countries.

    So to be clear, in order to win either of the sub-competitions you cannot cross the Weber Line into Australasia or vice versa and count species seen in both regions. Only people whose entire species lists come from within their relevant region will be considered for either of the sub-competitions. If you do cross the line, though, will are definitely still within the running for the overall global challenge.

    Rules are as follows:
    1. You have to actually see the animal, even if just for a second. You don't score if you visit a collection but don't see the animal (harsh, but fair);
    2. Proof via photographs is not required, your word is your bond;
    3. All entries must be presented in numbered list form, with scientific names included (simply to make it easier to keep track of and to avoid uncountable species being slipped in due to vagueness);
    4. You have to see the animal via normal public access (zookeeper for the day or photography days behind the scenes do not count) during normal public opening hours (i.e. no scoring because you know the keeper and can get access before/after hours). Basically the species has to be seen as Joe Public would;
    5. Any severely limited opening or private collections don't count for this challenge. Controversial yes, but see previous point and it isn't fair to include a handful of days these collections might be open to the public as this might logistically disadvantage a large number of people;
    6. Only public zoological collections, museums, public park displays, etc. count, animals seen at farms or pet stores do not count;
    7. Report/update your progress on this thread as you go along;
    8. Only one subspecies per species can be counted;
    9. Controversial entries due to splits will be discussed on a case-by-case basis;
    10. Domestics do not count, the animals must be in a wild form. You can count a species that's been domesticated just as long as the animal you're looking at isn't;
    11. Hybrid animals do not count;
    12. Wild animals do not count, all species must be seen in captivity under all the conditions listed above;
    13. Anyone caught severely violating any of the above rules and/or participating in extremely unsportsmanlike conduct on or even off the forum is subject to disqualification (these are made for fun, by all means take them seriously but please do not ruin the fun for anyone else. I do not expect to have any problems, but I've added this in just in case);
    14. Any issues with any of the above rules is open to discussion but the rules are set and any decisions made are final;
    15. Apart from the unlikely event that someone gets to see all the species potentially viewable by 12/31/20, the winner will be deemed to be the person who's seen the most at that date.

    As always, thanks to @Shorts for the original challenge idea and the general rules format.

    I'm looking forward to another great year and another great game so happy spotting!

    ~Thylo
     
  2. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a neat idea on how to run the challenge. Can't wait to see how many are actually exhibited outside of Australia (as well as within too).
     
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  3. ThomasNotTom

    ThomasNotTom Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Fantastic - those of us in the UK will be wanting to take a visit to Hamerton... I hope to get there at some point in the summer. In the mean time, zoos in the Southwest of the UK should keep me busy! :D
     
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  4. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Woo-hoo. I'm going to do so much better than in last year's challenge, when I got one species. I think this year I might get ... quickly adding up total on the fingers of one hand ... three! :D


    Do monotremes count also? It won't help me, but it might with the Americans :p
     
  5. Yoshistar888

    Yoshistar888 Well-Known Member

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    I’m devastated as I visited a wildlife park with tons of marsupials. yesterday.
     
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  6. FunkyGibbon

    FunkyGibbon Moderator Staff Member

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    Surely you can maintain sub-lists? ie I could visit both Europe and Australia, the latter briefly and the former extensively. Let's say by September I have basically got the Rest of the World cup sown up, and I plan a trip to Melbourne to challenge for the global title. However, I fall short of that. Have I now thrown away my claim to the Rest of the World, or am I just reading the rules wrong?
     
  7. Junklekitteb

    Junklekitteb Well-Known Member

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    Once again, a topic I cannot compete in, in spite of meager zoo visits.
     
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  8. Imperator Furiosa

    Imperator Furiosa Well-Known Member

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    Well this will definitely be a challenge! Hopefully this year some of my big zoo trips pan out because I actually want to stand a chance. At least I'll be able to get one or two species tomorrow.
     
  9. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    It’s actually happening! This year I should get more than my previous total of two!
     
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  10. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    You could win it!
     
  11. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    And you might not have to count a capybara as a member of Carnivora to get a final count higher than ten.
     
  12. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm still going to count Capybara as Carnivores, but that won't actually help because the category is Marsupials.
     
  13. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    I know :p. What I was trying to say was that this year you won’t have to consider a species from a completely different order a marsupial to get a half substantial list.
     
  14. MagpieGoose

    MagpieGoose Well-Known Member

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    Chester Zoo- 01/01/2020

    1) Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi)
    2) Dusky Pademelon (Thylogale brunii)
     
  15. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Oof. I might get 10 if I'm lucky...
     
  16. Mbwamwitu

    Mbwamwitu Well-Known Member

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    So excited to be in the US and be able to do this one (even if I don’t cross into double-digits) now! I feel for @Junklekitteb - India is definitely not even slightly competitive in the RotW category.

    But hey! Quick dash through National Zoo gives me two and lets me start tied for first :D

    1. Woylie (Bettongia penicillata)
    2. Bennett’s wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)
     
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  17. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Looks like everybody is starting out with two species.

    For myself, at Wellington Zoo today:

    1) Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus
    2) Tasmanian Devil Sarcophilus harrisii


    (Interestingly there are no duplicated species yet!)
     
  18. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Out of sheer curiosity, I checked what my score would have been for this challenge last year, not counting offshow species - 25 species :) which isn't too bad as the maximum possible in Europe at present is 37.
     
  19. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    That's higher than I expected.

    The maximum possible in New Zealand is six.

    The maximum in Australia is probably about 65 - maybe up to 70 at a stretch, but a few species are only held off-show and a couple may not be kept any more. You'd need to cover a lot of ground to collect them all, but one visit to somewhere like Healesville or Perth Zoo could get two-thirds of the European total in one go.
     
  20. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Count was slightly off, it's 36 :) for the record:

    1. Virginia Opossum (Didelphis virginiana)
    2. Linne's Mouse Opossum (Marmosa murina)
    3. Short-tailed Opossum (Monodelphis domestica)
    4. Four-eyed Opossum (Philander opossum)
    5. Kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei)
    6. Tiger Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus)
    7. Eastern Quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus)
    8. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
    9. Bear Cuscus (Ailurops ursinus)
    10. Ground Cuscus (Phalanger gymnotis)
    11. Short-tailed Spotted Cuscus (Spilocuscus maculatus)
    12. Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)
    13. Common Striped Possum (Dactylopsila trivirgata)
    14. Sugar Glider (Petaurus breviceps)
    15. Squirrel Glider (Petaurus norfolcensis)
    16. Feather-tailed Glider (Acrobates pygmaeus)
    17. Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons)
    18. Common Wombat (Vombatus ursinus)
    19. Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
    20. Rufous Bettong (Aepyprymnus rufescens)
    21. Brush-tailed Bettong (Bettongia penicillata)
    22. Long-nosed Potoroo (Potorous tridactylus)
    23. Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi)
    24. Matschie's Tree Kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei)
    25. White-striped Dorcopsis (Dorcopsis hageni)
    26. Western Grey Kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus)
    27. Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus)
    28. Agile Wallaby (Notamacropus agilis)
    29. Tammar Wallaby (Notamacropus eugenii)
    30. Parma Wallaby (Notamacropus parma)
    31. Red-necked Wallaby (Notamacropus rufogriseus)
    32. Common Wallaroo (Osphranter robustus)
    33. Red Kangaroo (Osphranter rufus)
    34. Yellow-footed Rock Wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus)
    35. Dusky Pademelon (Thylogale brunii)
    36. Swamp Wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

    Also, there are two species only held offshow at present:

    Derby's Woolly Opossum (Caluromys derbianus)
    Ringtail Possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)
     
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