Join our zoo community

Zoochat's Zoo

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by Indlovu, 3 Aug 2009.

  1. redpanda

    redpanda Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    7 Nov 2008
    Posts:
    965
    Location:
    Devon, England
    Judging by the ideas on here, I think the lay-out will have to be exhibit by exhibit (like at san diego) as ideas don't really seem to fit a common theme.

    That's possible, but I envisage quite a large group with regular feedings in the on-show enclosure increasing the chance of the gorillas being there. Alternatively, two groups (bachelor and breeding probably) could rotate between the enclosures on a daily / half daily basis.
     
  2. Indlovu

    Indlovu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,159
    Location:
    UK
    I've drawn up a plan of the Caribbean exhibit. I will try and describe it now:

    As you walk in you can see inside the Flamingo house using the same glass as they use at Chester (you can see in, they can't see out). Then there is a huge glass window looking over the flamingo's outdoor exhibit. Then you go into a reptile area. A large glass tank is split into three sections. One for Jamaican Boa, one for Rhinoceros Iguanas and a larger section for the Cuban Crocodile. Then there is a tunnel going through the Aquarium, like at Blue Planet. There are then two paths, one going through the Jamaican Fruit Bats, and an alternative for those who do not wish to go into the bats. Then there is an area where you can see into the Aquarium, also like Blue Planet. There are regular talks there. Then as you exit you see exhibits for St. Lucia Parrots and Hutia.

    There is also an outdoor viewing area for the Flamingos. I'll try and fit in some other species in the area.
     
  3. Cat-Man

    Cat-Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    6 Jul 2008
    Posts:
    2,196
    Location:
    GBR
    iit must be zoo geographic
     
  4. Cat-Man

    Cat-Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    6 Jul 2008
    Posts:
    2,196
    Location:
    GBR
    haw about a separate aquatic park!?
     
  5. redpanda

    redpanda Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    7 Nov 2008
    Posts:
    965
    Location:
    Devon, England
    Haz-cat, the bat cave in your Caribbean exhibit (coupled with Omaha’s “Kingdom’s of the Night”) has given me some inspiration for my own night house, “Life without Light”. Before you begin, I shall post a warning that it will be extremely boring and very looooooooooooong!

    To enter, you walk through quite a narrow, cave-like entrance in a hill side (the hill consists of dirt piled on top of the exhibit). This cave, it turns out, is actually a dimly illuminated lava tube called “Journey to the Centre of the Earth”, it twists and turns disorientating visitors. After travelling a short way, it opens out to reveal a large Sahara hall, entitled “The Greatest Desert”, where the sun has just set. The walls are painted with murals depicting distant sand dunes whilst the hall is a careful recreation with a path winding through the middle. There are many animals, both free-roaming and in enclosures of their own, although the barriers carefully hidden. Species include Fennec Fox, Sand Cat, Striped Hyena, Aardvark, Springhaa, Jerboa, various birds, and Monitor lizard.

    Upon leaving “The Greatest Desert”, visitors enter an interpretive hall called “When the Sun Goes Down”. Here there are a number of fun interactives demonstrating how creatures are adapted to life in the darkness, such as human versions of the fennec foxe's ears which show their acute hearing. Next is the “Crocodile Cave” based on those at Madagascar’s Ankarana Nature Reserve (yes I copied this idea from the Bronx!). There is a large public chamber with free-roaming Crowned Lemurs (they sometimes enter the caves), a large glass-fronted Nile Crocodile enclosure with underwater viewing, and a smaller glass-fronted Fossa enclosure.

    After that is a walk-through hall representing the Amazon Rainforest. The foliage is very dense so that you cannot see far meaning that the area can be a lot smaller than you imagine. Species include Two-Toed Sloth, Nine-Banded Armadillo, Owl Monkey, Golden Agouti, Kinkajou, Olingo, Tree Porcupine, Seba’s Fruit Bat, various free-flying birds, and Spectacled Caiman as well as Ocelot, Bush Dog, and Giant Anteater in separate exhibits. Next visitors enter a viewing gallery called “Flightless Birds and Living Fossils” which has a glass wall on one side, looking in on a New Zealand Forest. It contains Kiwi, Kakapo, Lyrebird, Tuatara, and many other species...as well as Chlidonias who keeps everyone quiet ;).

    Leaving this gallery, visitors enter the “Wet Cave” with water dripping from the ceiling into a large pool containing several Japanese Giant Salamanders. The cave is roughly circular and visitors skirt around the edge before leaving into the Eucalypt forest. This is another large hall which the public walk through with woodland surrounding a fast-running brook that visitors traverse on a rickety bridge. Species include (lots of) Parma Wallaby, Koala, Tree Kangaroo, Common Wombat, Ring-Tailed Possum, Striped Possum, Potoroo, Bilby, various birds and lizards, Fresh-Water Crocodile and Kreft’s Turtle.

    Next is a room containing a number of “jewel case” exhibits. It is large and roughly rectangular with glass-fronted enclosures for Potto, Slow Loris, Angwantibo (because I love the name), Mouse Deer, Greater Bushbaby, Binturong, Ratel, Dwarf Mongoose as well as a Madagascan forest (Aye-Aye, Giant Jumping Rat, Dwarf Lemur, Mouse Lemur, Weasel Lemur, Black Lemur and Indri) covering one wall. In the middle of the room are a number of smaller exhibits, for (surprisingly) smaller animals such as rodents and frogs. Leaving this room, visitors enter a submarine simulator called “Sinking Feeling” which pretends to take them to the bottom of the ocean. They exit on the other side into a winding cavern with occasional glass-covered cracks revealing a dark ocean.

    Finally, it opens up and visitors find themselves in a tunnel surrounded by the sea bed, this is called “Rock Bottom” and has hundreds of strange deep-sea fish. Near the end of the tunnel are some artificial sea-floor volcanoes, casting light on the tank and demonstrating how creatures can live without any direct sun-light. Leaving “Rock Bottom”, the public enters “The Midnight Bar” where the only light source is UV and the walls are covered with strips of UV paint creating a unique environment. Also, set into the walls are tanks containing Blind cave fish. Next is a recreation of a Florida swamp which visitors traverse on a floating board-walk. It is enormous with pools for American Alligator, American Crocodile, Alligator Snapping Turtle, Beaver, as well as fish such as Gar and Sunfish and an island for racoons. There are also a number of “jewel-cases” set into the environment, for example, a coral snake terrarium in a tree trunk.

    Exiting the swamp through a building with the facade of a trapper’s cabin, visitors find themselves in “Nature’s Nightmares”, a number of jewel cases for nocturnal reptiles, amphibians and insects. The idea is to show how well adapted these species are – and give the visitor a fright! Leaving this room, the public are suddenly underground in a narrow passage. After going round some corners they emerge into a large chamber surrounded by Naked Molerats, busy in their tunnels.

    The final exhibit follows (yes, the end is nigh!), it is entitled “The Underworld” and is an enormous walk-through bat cave. They have been in a few of the previous exhibits, but here they steal the show with hundreds of individuals from many species. A winding path goes through the cave, and next to this is a graphic depiction of how bat guano can feed a huge number of mini-beasts, as well as signs that dispel common myths such as bats being blind and getting stuck in your hair. At last, you leave “the Underworld” (and the bats) through the cave mouth and find yourself dazzled by sunlight – the end.

    Phew!
     
    Last edited: 4 Aug 2009
  6. foz

    foz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    1,407
    Location:
    England
    Why must it be zoo geographic? ther are alterntives to displaying them geogrphically:

    - displaying them in biomes ie rainforest animal, savannha animals etc
    - displaying them inaccordance to the role they tek wihin an ecosystem for exmaple there ould be an area for introduced predators such as americna mink in the UK, red fox and cane toad.
    - It could be according to the animals familes (ie all the cats together, all the bears together, all the primates)
    - it could just be where ever the zoo can find a suitable home for them.

    each one has its own set of pros and cons as does geographic display
     
  7. Indlovu

    Indlovu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,159
    Location:
    UK
    I'll probably have a different section for each continent.
     
  8. Mike11

    Mike11 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    1 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    803
    Location:
    England
    Ive come up with an idea for Cat Species,
    Set in a semi-woodland you enter the exhibit on a path next to a stream.The stream then comes up to a Jaguar Enclosure and then goes through it,The enclosure is tall and large think Aspinall Style but with more vegitation and Rocks and old trees to act as platforms and fewer log beams perhaps just metal bars like.You look on to the enclosure the other end of the stream through a glass viewing window but there is still a barrier to seperate the public.You then go along the path and reach very similiar but smaller enclosures for Ocelot,Fishing Cat and Sri Lankan Leopard you then reach a clearing and you come to a Large African Lion Enclosure with a Kopje ontop of a hill next to 1/2 mature trees in the middle with a Glass viewing window of similiar style to the other enclosures the stream goes through and makes a small pond in the Lion Enclosure.Smaller 'Clearing Enclosure's' hold African Golden Cat,Serval and African Leopard.Going to another Wooded Section you come up to an enclosure of similiar design to the Jaguar but for African Leopard - The Leopards have access to this and the clearing enclosure.
    This Exhibit is for African,Asian and South American Cat Species and offers the guests good views of the cats,The Cats privacy and there is no indoor viewing for the Cats as these are all rather secretive species and this needs to be respected.
    This will probs never happen in most zoos who are desperate for a closer experiance but its an idea that i will hold in my head for ever.
    Regards
     
  9. Indlovu

    Indlovu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,159
    Location:
    UK
    come on, more ideas!
     
  10. simmojunior

    simmojunior Active Member

    Joined:
    23 Jun 2009
    Posts:
    26
    Location:
    London
    How about a large south/central american section which leads visitors past exhibits which gradually are for species which live at higher altitudes. I think it should be a simple path that gradually goes up an ever steepening large hill. It should start with river/wetland species such as capybara, anaconda, various monkeys and giant otters. Perhaps the monkeys should be on islands in a large lake with animals like otters and capybaras having fenced off sections of the lake adjoining the land. A boardwalk would have to go over the lake to allow visitors to see the monkeys. Then perhaps it should move to south american savannah species such as rhea, anteater and maned wolf. It should then move to rainforest (more monkeys, walk through toucan aviary, as well as some rarer species of small mammal, maybe grison, as well as a waterfall exhibit for jaguars). It should then lead up the hill to a cloud forest section which will contain spectacled bears, coatis and birds. It will finally emerge at the top to a mountain area with mountain tapir, mountain paca, vicuna and condor. Sorry for the very long post.
     
  11. Cat-Man

    Cat-Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    6 Jul 2008
    Posts:
    2,196
    Location:
    GBR
    3 asian trails

    one is called trail of the indian forest with chousinghua, pygmy forest hog, hanuam lagurs, tigers, dhole, hyena and sloth bear
     
  12. Cat-Man

    Cat-Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    6 Jul 2008
    Posts:
    2,196
    Location:
    GBR
    will post more later
     
  13. Dom

    Dom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Dec 2008
    Posts:
    230
    Location:
    UK
    Ok, how about a huge building called "Wetlands of the world".

    First section is themed around south east asian mangrove swamps, with probocis monkeys, a beach exibit with fidler crabs and mudskippers with a tide that comes in and flows out dunring the day. Next, the path slopes downwards, giving a view of a large tank of brackish water fish, and a large glass viewing area for saltwater crocodiles. The path then goes back to its original height, with above water viewing of the crocs. Also, plenty of free flight birds.

    Next section is the Florida everglades, featuring a huge manatee pool. The path goes on through the swamp, with large cyprus trees full of nesting ibis and egrets. There is a wooden walkway over the manatee pool, which comes down to ground level at the other end of the room, next to an exibit for American alligators.

    The final section is based on the central African Mangroves, with a large pygmy hippo exibit being the centre of the room. The hippo exibit has a large sandy beach, which merges into a grassed area, with plenty of small trees and bushes. The hippos also have a deep pool, with a few small fish in it. On a large island habitat live a small group of otter (im not sure what species live there). Next to them is an exibit for water mongoose.

    Finally, before the exit is a room highlighting the risks to wetlands.
     
  14. Indlovu

    Indlovu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,159
    Location:
    UK
    How about Cape Clawless Otters or Spot Necked Otters?
     
  15. siamang27

    siamang27 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    7 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    559
    Location:
    Texas, United States
    Would be awesome to see a South American walk-through aviary with these birds in it:

    Great Tinamou
    Spixs' Guan (?)
    Black-bellied Whistling-duck
    Brazilian Teal
    Ringed Teal
    Rosybill
    Horned Screamer (?)
    Sunbittern
    Gray-winged Trumpeter
    Limpkin (?)
    Wattled Jacana
    Scaled Dove
    Croaking Ground-dove
    Pacific Parrotlet
    Orange-winged Amazon
    Mealy Parrot
    Hawk-headed Parrot
    Guira Cuckoo
    White-tailed Trogon
    Costa's Hummingbird
    Broad-billed Hummingbird
    Sparkling Violet-ear
    Green Mango
    Antillean Mango
    Puerto Rican Emerald
    Saphire-spangled Emerald
    Glittering-throat Emerald
    Amazilia Hummingbird
    Rufous-tailed Hummingbird
    Blue-crowned Motmot
    Barred Antshrike
    Short-tailed Antthrush
    Lesser Kiskadee
    Spangled Cotinga
    Screaming Piha
    White Bellbird
    Capuchinbird
    Crimson Fruitcrow
    Bare-necked Fruitcrow
    Golden-headed Manakin
    Plush-crested Jay
    White-necked Thrush
    Green Honeycreeper
    Red-legged Honeycreeper
    Purple Honeycreeper
    Blue-gray Tanager
    Palm Tanager
    White-lined Tanager
    Swallow Tanager
    Silver-beaked Tanager
    Turquoise Tanager
    Bay-headed Tanager
    Paradise Tanager
    Red-throated Ant-tanager
    Thick-billed Euphonia
    Violaceous Euphonia
    Blue Dacnis
    Orangequit
    Bananaquit
    Saffron Finch
    Variable Seedeater
    Grayish Saltator
    Red-crested Cardinal
    Yellow-billed Cardinal

    With some more in separate aviaries like oropendolas, toucans, caciques and cocks-of-the-rock.

    That covers more families of birds in South America than any other aviary does I think...
     
  16. kiang

    kiang Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2007
    Posts:
    6,364
    Location:
    Argyllshire
    a decent restaurant!
     
  17. Ann Littlewood

    Ann Littlewood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    69
    Location:
    Oregon
    As long as we're free to imagine... I want thylacines! Lots of thylacines!
    And something like the National Zoo's O line--cables overhead for orangs to traverse the zoo. A "racetrack" for cheetahs so they get exercise and predator fun. Big, complex exhibits that are designed with natural behavior in mind. I'll stop there for tonight!
     
  18. Indlovu

    Indlovu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,159
    Location:
    UK
    ok, maybe not THAT imaginative.
     
  19. redpanda

    redpanda Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    7 Nov 2008
    Posts:
    965
    Location:
    Devon, England
    A paddock for Dodo anyone? Woolly Mammoth in the elephant house? Hey, why don't we go all out and do the whole Jurassic Park safari!
     
  20. Indlovu

    Indlovu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,159
    Location:
    UK
    OK, i should have made it clearer: you can only have animals that still exist today.