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Chlidonias

collared lory (Vini solitarius)

Kula Eco park, Fiji. Photo taken 11 August 2007. This is one of my girlfriend's photos not one of mine. The collared lory was formerly in its own genus, Phygis. The Fijian name for the bird is kula, hence the name of Kula Eco Park.

collared lory (Vini solitarius)
Chlidonias, 11 Apr 2008
    • Chlidonias
      Kula Eco park, Fiji. Photo taken 11 August 2007. This is one of my girlfriend's photos not one of mine. The collared lory was formerly in its own genus, Phygis. The Fijian name for the bird is kula, hence the name of Kula Eco Park.
    • gentle lemur
      A very beautiful species. I would love the chance to photograph this bird.

      Alan
    • Writhedhornbill
      I think Walsrode and Loro Parque keep them Alan, and then Of course San Diego...
    • chuck
      unfortunate the San Diego Zoo does not take them seriously and have let there population decrease instead of try to increase the population their population has decreased by half in 2 years. Out of 60 some birds they have only 25 left of the Collard Lory. What a big disappointment to let a species die out in captivity with climate change at the Islands door with the rise of sea level. Such gifts from other countries should not be disregarded in such a manner when there are lots of people that would give these birds room to reproduce in captivity and increase their population in the USA.
    • gerenuk
      I can hardly imagine that the zoo had 35 die in 2 years time. How do you know that individuals have not been dispersed to other zoos or private collections? I'm not sure if you realize that much of Kula Eco Park's bird collection was sourced from San Diego Zoo.

      While Fiji will be impacted by various challenges from climate change, it will hardly be submerged from sea level rise. The fate of Fiji's wildlife lies the country's ability to sustainably harvest forests and control the impact of invasive species.
    • Kifaru Bwana
      Cannot but agree. It is stupefying how fashion trends have enabled some zoos to move away from true ex situ species conservation of - supposedly - non mega, yet critically endangered taxa! :(
    • chuck
      With the information received by zoo records it implies that it has happened. Some species that use the mango groves will have problems with rising sea levels since some birds use these as food sources. With higher water storms become stronger and do more damage high or low islands, people and crops move up into the higher areas to be more safe. This is not just about the Collard Lory but also other lories, parrots and other wildlife also. As far as I have been told there has been no Collards forwarded to other zoos in the US. All the Blue Crown Lories have been recalled to the San Diego Zoo also and that they have around 17 of them 5 of them babies that were recently hatched. So with the Blue Crown Lory all that is left is the ones at San Diego Zoo and the ones in private sector which the San Diego Zoo shared long ago with the private sector. Which brings the population up since there is more in the private sector than the zoos.
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  • Category:
    Kula Eco Park
    Uploaded By:
    Chlidonias
    Date:
    11 Apr 2008
    View Count:
    2,355
    Comment Count:
    7

    EXIF Data

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    Mime Type:
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    Width:
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    Height:
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    Make:
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    Model:
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    Date / Time:
    2007:08:11 12:54:04
    Exposure Time:
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    ISO Speed Rating:
    ISO 800
    Focal Length:
    20.1 mm
     

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