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Animals of Tring Park

Discussion in 'United Kingdom' started by vogelcommando, 14 Dec 2014.

  1. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  2. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    This is a very interesting article; thank you for posting it.

    It is somewhat surprising, though, that the article doesn’t mention the cassowaries that Rothschild kept in Tring Park as these were his particular favourites. In addition to the cassowaries living in the park, he acquired more than sixty mounted cassowaries for the Tring Museum although only a few of these are currently on display.

    The reference to giant tortoises is also interesting as these were another of Rothschild’s special interests. He contributed a large sum of money towards building the Tortoise House (later the Humming Bird House) that was erected at London Zoo in 1897.
     
  3. Tim Brown

    Tim Brown Well-Known Member

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    At the risk of sounding contrary(who me?)..the piece doesn't tell us anything we didn't know already.However,somewhere in my library ,and I know not where at the moment ,I have a reference to Black Wallabies being kept at Tring.Now ,this species is almost unknown in captivity,even in Australia,and im tempted to say that they were something else(Swamp Wallabies?).Even if I cant find the reference I know I haven't imagined it.Can anyone help?
     
  4. Tim Brown

    Tim Brown Well-Known Member

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    erm.. I meant Black WALLAROO..but then im sure the reference says that because it made me look twice!
     
  5. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Black Wallaby *is* an alternative name for Swamp Wallaby so I suspect you are correct.