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Are These in Captivity?

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by MonkeyBat, 5 Nov 2019.

  1. SivatheriumGuy

    SivatheriumGuy Well-Known Member

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    There's just one Amazonian river dolphin in Europe, in Duisburg. African manatees are fairly more common in Asian zoos.
     
  2. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

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    Apparently, Pacific hagfish are decreasing according to IUCN. Is this true? And if it is, do you or any other zoochat member know why?
    Thanks.
     
  3. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

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    Zootierliste says they had them at the antewerp zoo. How recent was that?
     
    Last edited: 16 Dec 2019
  4. Crotalus

    Crotalus Well-Known Member

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    I think hagfish might be sensitive to temperature change, but I am not certain.
     
  5. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

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    So, climate change? That seems to make sense, but not make sense at the same time.
     
  6. lintworm

    lintworm Well-Known Member

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    There are no Amazon manatees in Europe, only Antillean manatees.

    @Luke da Zoo nerd IUCN red list has a header for each species with threats and the only threat mentioned is (over)fishing, not climate change.
     
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  7. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, missed that. Thanks for the information!
     
  8. drill

    drill Well-Known Member

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    Ruspoli's turaco and Black bee-eater?
     
  9. Mehdi

    Mehdi Well-Known Member

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    African manatees, as pointed out before, are kept in a bunch of Asian collections such as COEX Aquarium in South Korea, Toba Aquarium in Japan and a few other collections in China as well. Amazonian manatee isn't kept anywhere outside of South America barring a very old individual (if it's still alive) at Atagawa Tropical & Alligator Garden still in Japan, which makes it the only country to have all 4 sirenians displayed in public collections.
     
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  10. RatioTile

    RatioTile Well-Known Member

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    Japanese serow is common in Japan in the larger (and even some small) zoos. China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan all have African manatees. The Amazonian manatee in Japan is a 53-year old male, and he was still around when I visited the garden park in July.
     
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  11. drill

    drill Well-Known Member

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    In America, Japanese serows are in Trevor Zoo, Roosevelt Park Zoo, and i think perhaps others.
     
  12. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    They arrived in1969, not sure when they left.
     
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  13. temp

    temp Well-Known Member

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    The captive Titicaca water frogs are normal. It's just that many people think about the giants filmed by Coustea half a century ago when they think about the species, but that's bit misleading.

    It can be compared to big tuskers among African elephants. Even historically, there's no evidence that big tuskers were the most common males. Even historically, there's no evidense that the giants in the Titicaca water frog was the most common size (based on historical records, the typical SVL range for the Titicaca wf is slightly smaller than the typical range for the American bullfrog, another species where giants sometimes appear). However, big tuskers and giant Titicaca wf's indisputably were much more common in the past and made up a significantly higher percentage of the population. Big tuskers were, unsurprisingly, a good first target for poachers and hunters going after ivory or an impressive trophy. The giants among the Tititcaca wf's were also the obvious first target when hunters startet persecuting the species at high levels. So, we're left with less tuskers and less giant frogs, and efficiently reduced their chance of breeding and passing on their genes for these traits. Additionally, both are quite long-lived species. Although less data is available for the Titicaca wf than elephants, we're likely talking 15+ years to become a giant frog. That's a long time where it has to avoid poachers in the wild and quite a bit older than any of the frogs kept in zoos outside the native countries. Individuals with the potential to become giants might still be among the North Hemisphere captives. We'll see in some years.

    A similar pattern that likely has been caused by the same things can be seen in the closely related Lake Junin frog (the actual biggest fully aquatic frog in the world, not the Titicaca wf as often claimed). If the Titicaca wf really ends up being as relatively easy to breed as suggested by the initial trials, I hope Denver eventually expands with the Lake Junin frog. They're already supporting in situ conservation work for it and there are plans to start a local captive breeding program too, which could become a source for a North Hemisphere breeding program.
     
  14. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know of any White-Tailed Mongoose in captivity?
     
  15. Mehdi

    Mehdi Well-Known Member

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    There is at least one currently held at Sofia Zoo in Bulgaria, according to zootierliste.
     
  16. drill

    drill Well-Known Member

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    South korea might
     
  17. drill

    drill Well-Known Member

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    Ruspoli's turaco?
     
  18. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    I've no clue. Checked Zootierliste and the species isn't even listed. So I would say no... except maybe for zoos in its home range.
     
  19. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

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    Any Mimic octopuses in captivity?
     
  20. Luca Bronzi

    Luca Bronzi Well-Known Member

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    I saw a guy on Facebook who had one.