Join our zoo community

Cranes Worldwide

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by Galapagos Penguin, 2 May 2021.

  1. Galapagos Penguin

    Galapagos Penguin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Apr 2021
    Posts:
    543
    Location:
    United States
    Eurasian Crane (Grus Grus)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Lakes, Countrysides, Forests
    Diet - Invertebrates, Reptiles, Amphibians, Fish
    Geographical Range - Europe & Asia
    Predators - Eagles, Birds Of Prey
    Conservation Status: Common cranes are listed as least concern. They are among one of the most widespread species of cranes.

    Whooping Crane (Grus Americana)
    Habitat - Woodlands, Marshes, Prairies, Forests
    Diet - Invertebrates, Small Mammals, Reptiles, Amphibians, Fish
    Geographical Range - North America
    Predators - Wolverines, Foxes, Bears
    Conservation Status: Whooping cranes are critically endangered. There are as few as 100 left in the world.

    Sarus Crane (Grus Antigone)
    Habitat - Forests, Swamps, Marshes, Fields
    Diet - Invertebrates, Fish, Reptiles, Amphibians
    Geographical Range - Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia, Australia
    Predators - Jackals Eat Their Eggs
    Conservation Status: Sarus cranes are listed as threatened, with around 15,000 in the wild.

    Sandhill Crane (Grus Canadensis)
    Habitat - Rivers, Wetlands, Plains
    Diet - Seeds, Grains, Insects
    Geographical Range - North America, Russia
    Predators - Coyotes, Raccoons
    Conservation Status: Sandhill cranes are among one of the most popular crane species, however a few subspecies are endangered. There is an estimate around 650,000 in the wild.

    Demoiselle Crane (Grus Virgo)
    Habitat - Steppes, Wetlands, Lakes, Savannas
    Diet - Seeds, Grasses, Invertebrates, Reptiles
    Geographical Range - North Africa, Central Asia
    Predators - Minks, Weasels
    Conservation Status: Demoiselle cranes are listed as least concern. They are very abundant in population.

    Wattled Crane (Bugeranus Carunculatus)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Submerged Grassland
    Diet - Seeds, Invertebrates, Amphibians, Reptiles
    Geographical Range - Africa, South Of The Sahara
    Predators - Jackals
    Conservation Status: Wattled cranes are vulnerable. They are one of the rarest cranes in Africa.

    Blue Crane (Anthropoides Paradiseus)
    Habitat - Open Grassland, Semi-Desert, Fields
    Diet - Invertebrates, Reptiles, Amphibians, Fish
    Geographical Range - South Africa
    Predators - Painted Dogs, Wild Cats
    Conservation Status: Blue cranes are listed as vulnerable. They have around 25,000 in the wild as of 2021.

    Hooded Crane (Grus Monacha)
    Habitat - Forests, Grassland
    Diet - Plants, Berries, Invertebrates, Amphibians
    Geographical Range - East Asia
    Predators - Tigers
    Conservation Status: Hooded cranes are listed as vulnerable. There is an estimate of around 16,000 in the world today.

    Black Crowned Crane (Balearica Pavonina)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Savannas, Grassland
    Diet - Invertebrates, Amphibians, Fish, Reptiles
    Geographical Range - West Africa
    Predators - Painted Dogs, Lions, Cheetahs
    Conservation Status: Black crowned cranes are a vulnerable species. They are one of Africa’s most threatened birds.

    Grey Crowned Crane (Balearica Regulorum)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Rivers, Savannas
    Diet - Invertebrates, Plants, Seeds
    Geographical Range - East Africa
    Predators - Painted Dogs, Lions, Cheetahs
    Conservation Status: Grey crowned cranes are even more endangered than their black cousins, with an estimate of around 10,000 left. They are common in US zoos, however.

    Red Crowned Crane (Grus Japonensis)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Marshes,
    Diet - Fish, Amphibians, Rodents, Grass, Berries
    Geographical Range - Japan, Central Asia
    Predators - Lynx, Foxes, Wolves, Badgers
    Conservation Status: Red crowned cranes are endangered with as few as 3,000 in the wild today.

    White-Naped Crane (Grus Vipio)
    Habitat - Meadows, Valleys, Wetlands
    Diet - Roots, Plants, Invertebrates, Amphibians
    Geographical Range - Central & East Asia
    Predators - Cats, Birds Of Prey
    Conservation Status: White-naped cranes are threatened in the wild. There are around 10,000 in the wild today.

    Black-Necked Crane (Grus Nigricollis)
    Habitat - Plateaus, Pastures, Wetlands, Lakes
    Diet - Plants, Invertebrates, Rodents, Roots
    Geographical Range - Indian Subcontinent, Tibet, Himalayas
    Predators - Leopards
    Conservation Status: Black-necked cranes are vulnerable, with around 12,000 remaining today.

    Siberian Crane (Grus Leucogeranus)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Tundras, Taiga
    Diet - Invertebrates, Plants, Fish
    Geographical Range - Russia, China, Middle East
    Predators - Eagles, Bears, Cats
    Conservation Status: Siberian cranes are one of the rarest cranes in the world. They are a critically endangered species with around 3,000 left.

    Australian Crane (Grus Rubicundus)
    Habitat - Wetlands, Creeks, Mudflats
    Diet - Invertebrates, Fish, Berries, Plants
    Geographical Range - Australia & New Guinea
    Predators - Dingoes
    Conservation Status: Australian cranes are one of the most common species, with around 100,000 alive in Australia.
     
  2. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Sep 2017
    Posts:
    8,438
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    You can see all 15 species at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin.

    I've never heard that name for a Brolga.
     
  3. MRJ

    MRJ Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Jan 2008
    Posts:
    1,977
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Agreed. Brolga is the correct common name.
    Also whooping cranes, while still endangered, now sit at around 1,000 birds.
    Lastly, not trying to lay it on, but the second word in a scientific name always starts with a lower case letter, ie Grus grus
     
    Last edited: 2 May 2021
    TinoPup likes this.
  4. Galapagos Penguin

    Galapagos Penguin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Apr 2021
    Posts:
    543
    Location:
    United States
    I’ve heard both used, however Brolga is the most common name.
     
  5. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Sep 2017
    Posts:
    8,438
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Then why did you use Australian Crane?
     
  6. Galapagos Penguin

    Galapagos Penguin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Apr 2021
    Posts:
    543
    Location:
    United States
    I just thought it sounded better lol
     
  7. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Sep 2017
    Posts:
    8,438
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    As of 2020, there are 808 Whooping Cranes globally - 138 in captivity, the rest in the wild.
     
    MRJ likes this.
  8. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2008
    Posts:
    1,719
    Location:
    Czech republic
    Population of Eurasian Crane (Grus Grus) is growing, both in numbers and by extending its breeding range, the lastest estimate I have found:

    "Common Crane is one of the most abundant of the world's 15 crane species, with a total world population of more than 700,000 birds."

    Source
     
  9. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Sep 2017
    Posts:
    8,438
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I believe Sandhill is the most abundant.
     
  10. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2008
    Posts:
    1,719
    Location:
    Czech republic
    What is the latest population estimate? If it´s still only 650.000 mentioned above, that is less than Eurasian/Common crane.
     
  11. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Sep 2017
    Posts:
    8,438
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I can't find any great recent estimates, but they have been increasing rapidly over the past few decades. The number is probably similar to or slightly higher than Eurasian.
     
  12. Great Argus

    Great Argus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2018
    Posts:
    3,653
    Location:
    California
    Sarus, Sandhill, White-naped, and Brolga are now placed in Antigone.

    Now placed in Leucogeranus.

    Now placed in Anthropoides. Also I don't think mink and weasels are their main predators.
     
    WalkingAgnatha and TinoPup like this.
  13. Great Argus

    Great Argus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2018
    Posts:
    3,653
    Location:
    California
    I can't find any full estimates either, but the partial estimates I'm seeing place them well over the 650,000 mark. Apart from the Mississippi subspecies, they are commonly referred to as "low risk", "increasing", and "abundant".
     
    TinoPup likes this.
  14. Galapagos Penguin

    Galapagos Penguin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Apr 2021
    Posts:
    543
    Location:
    United States
    they don’t have many predators, but minks and weasels are known to eat their eggs.