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Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary On Show Species List

Discussion in 'Australia' started by LaughingDove, 29 Jun 2016.

  1. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Warsaw, Poland
    This is a list of all species held on show in Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary on my visit on the 13th of June 2016. Animals only visible in shows are marked with *.
    There were also many species of wild birds and reptiles that I saw in the zoo that are not included in this list.

    Mammals:
    Koala
    Tasmanian Devil
    Eastern Grey Kangaroo
    Red Kangaroo
    Swamp Wallaby
    Tammar Wallaby
    Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby
    Red-necked Wallaby
    Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo
    Grey-headed Flying-fox
    Short-beaked Echidna
    Hairy-nosed Wombat
    Dingo
    Quokka
    Domestic (Merino) Sheep
    'Golden' Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula fuliginosus) *
    Long-nosed Potoroo
    Yellow-bellied Glider
    Squirrel Glider
    Feathertail Glider
    Spinifex Hopping Mouse
    Water Rat
    Greater Bilby
    Ghost Bat

    Reptiles:
    Brisbane River Turtle
    Freshwater Crocodile
    Saltwater Crocodile
    Green Iguana
    Mary River Turtle
    Perentie
    Amethystine Python
    Water Dragon
    Mertens' Water Monitor
    Eastern Long-necked Turtle
    Veiled Chameleon
    Green Tree Python
    Broad-headed Snake
    Common Death Adder
    Lace Monitor
    Boa Constrictor
    Knob-tailed Gecko (Nephrurus amyae)
    Frilled Lizard
    Coastal Carpet Python


    Birds:
    Bar-shouldered Dove
    Rainbow Lorikeet
    Emerald Dove
    Black-winged Stilt
    Pied Imperial Pigeon
    Sacred Kingfisher
    Luzon Bleeding-heart Dove
    Topknot Pigeon
    Chestnut-breasted Mannikin
    Wonga Pigeon
    Brown Cuckoo-dove
    Buff-banded Rail
    Satin Bowerbird
    Scaly-breasted Lorikeet
    Emu
    Southern Cassowary
    Eastern Grass Owl
    Tawny Frogmouth
    Bush Stone-curlew
    Austrlian King Parrot
    Galah
    Superb Parrot
    Crimson Rosella
    Princess Parrot
    Gang-gang Cockatoo
    Little Corella
    Musk Lorikeet
    Major Mitchell's Cockatoo
    Bourke's Parrot
    Mulga Parrot
    Cockatiel
    Regent Parrot
    Rufous Owl*
    Black-breasted Buttonquail
    Little Lorikeet
    Noisy Pitta
    Rose-crowned Fruit-dove
    Wompoo Fruit-dove
    Eastern Whipbird
    Red-browed Fig-parrot
    Red-faced Parrot-finch
    Black-necked Stork
    Brahminy Kite
    Pacific Black Duck
    White-eyed Duck
    Wandering Whistling Duck
    Plumed Whistling Duck
    Glossy Black Cockatoo
    Hooded Robin
    Orange-bellied Parrot
    Star Finch
    Black-throated Finch
    Superb Fairy-wren
    White-browed Woodswallow
    Squatter Pigeon
    Budgerigar
    Chiming Wedgebill
    Regent Bowerbird
    Red-tailed Black Cockatoo*
    Black-breasted Eagle*
    Black Kite*
    Barking Owl*
    Australian Pelican*
    Wedge-tailed Eagle*
    Blua-and-gold Macaw*
    Green-winged Macaw*

    Amphibians:
    White-lipped Tree-frog
    Liem's Tinker Frog
    Spotted Tree Frog
    Cane Toad
    Magnificent Tree Frog

    Fish:
    Archerfish
    Freshwater Stonefish
    Australian Lungfish
    Four unsigned rainbowfishes (http://www.zoochat.com/60/four-rainbowfish-species-452343/)

    Scientific names can be provided on request.
     
    Last edited: 1 Jul 2016
  2. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The zoo has approximately 115 species and from photos appears to be well worth visiting, but of note is that since the park's location is in a tourist hot-spot the admission fees are staggering. It is $49 per adult and that does not include the cost of parking, lunch, "cuddling a koala" and many other potential fees. A lot of visitors would be families shelling out a few hundred dollars for a visit.
     
  3. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I would say it's worth visiting and although it is expensive, everything in Gold Coast is. I assume you've seen my pictures and species list of David Fleay Wildlife Park which is a far smaller zoo and admission there is still over $20 per adult. I was lucky to only have to pay $20 to go in to Currumbin due to a deal that they had from their website.

    (Also note that I have just noticed I have missed off one species from this list - Southern Cassowary)
     
  4. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    Melbourne, Aust (ex. NZ)
    Might be worth noting that David Fleay is government run, while Currumbin is owned by the National Trust of Queensland, which may help explain price differences. Overall though, all attractions in that part of Australia are exceedingly expensive, and it is well worth searching for vouchers and deals, which are numerous.
     
  5. DavidBrown

    DavidBrown Moderator Staff Member

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    Is it weird that they have a non-Australian species of tree kangaroo? Are Lumholz's or Bennett's tree kangaroos not represented in captivity?
     
  6. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

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    There are a few Lumholtz's around in captivity, no Bennett's as far as I know. I believe there is a breeding programme in Australian Zoos for Goodfellow's though.
     
  7. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    David, there are breeding programs for both Goodfellow's (a WAZA Global effort) and for Lumholtz's tree kangaroo (a native ZAA / ARAZPA native species program). The former is more or less all Australian and the latter more or less restricted to Queensland zoos.
     
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