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Design An Exhibit

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by AnaheimZoo, 4 Sep 2012.

  1. AnaheimZoo

    AnaheimZoo Well-Known Member

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    This thread is a follow up to "Design A Zoo". I thought posting exhibits one at a time on "Design A Zoo" was defeating the purpose of the thread, so I thought I'd create this one to allow posting of individual exhibits.

    I was extremely tired of those "create-an-exhibit" threads where you were given requirements and a deadline - this is all about being fun without guidelines! Post whenever and whatever you please! However, I'm just letting you know, I DO NOT want to see:

    - Zoo Tycoon 1/2 exhibit creations. They belong elsewhere.

    - Lists of animals you'd want in your exhibit. I've said it time and time again. Lists are not imaginative. If I see lists, I may flag the posts. I'm that annoyed by them. They're practically spam! :p

    Ah, well, anyway - I'll post an exhibit design that I posted on "Design A Zoo" as an example. This is what I'm expecting to see from you all. Have fun creating!

    -AnaheimZoo​
     
  2. AnaheimZoo

    AnaheimZoo Well-Known Member

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    Example of "Design An Exhibit" exhibits

    Take a journey through the heart of North America to traverse long, winding trails overlooking stunning exhibits that accommodate herds of huge bison, remarkable pronghorn, burrowing owls, badgers, and prairie dogs, and a variety of other prairie animals bigger than the Great Plains themselves.

    Welcome to
    The Anaheim Zoo’s

    The Great American Prairie
    The North American Great Plains is an area of land that covers nearly one and a half million square miles, stretching from central Canada to the southern tip of the United States and covering more than ten states and provinces. It is made up of a mixture of grasslands, steppes, and prairies, and houses an amazing array of animal and plant species. On your adventure through the Plains, uncover the history of this famous region, find its prehistoric inhabitants, read about the survival success story of the American bison population, encounter its present-day residents, and come to find an overall appreciation for the majesty of the American prairie.

    Greater Sage Grouse & Lesser Prairie Chicken
    As your journey begins, you are greeted by a spacious field of beautiful yellow needle-and-thread grass, one of the more abundant species of grass on the Plains. The exhibit’s sides are moated, giving guests a nice overlook of the enclosure. It is nicely planted with a variety of other plants, mainly grasses such as little bluestem and bluebunch wheatgrass, and sagebrush. In the midst of the brush, you spot a vibrant patch of orangey-yellow and red. After a double-take, you notice that this “plant” has stripes and a pointy, black beak. It turns out that it is none other than a lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus), a male, scouting his home for a potential mate. His adorable whoops seem to attract a female. He inflates his pouches and hops up and down to try and impress her, but after further inspection, the female eventually turns him down.

    Behind the lesser prairie chicken exhibit is an even bigger plain for greater sage grouse (Centrocerus urophasianus). It also has needle-and-thread grass, with a row of Indian grass running along the front of the enclosure. The courtship displays of the males resemble those of the prairie chickens, but are slightly different. It is one of the most unique things you have ever witnessed. His two bright yellow throat sacs swell and suddenly “pop” as he pumps his chest in and out. The drably-plumaged females pay him no mind. Whilst the birds’ mating rituals were unsuccessful, you are glad you had the opportunity to see them.

    A bridge runs over a small ravine, where you have a better view of the plains. A waterfall is on your right, with thick forests surrounding it. You continue on, the pops of the sage grouse displays still audible.

    To the right is a long, cabin-like building. It is the History of the Great American Prairie building. Inside, you can read about many events in the history of the Plains, such as European settlement and the railroads built by pioneers. You can also learn of the customs of the Native Americans, like their hunting techniques and the differences in the lifestyles of the many tribes that once lived here. Dioramas show what their villages look like, and give you a better idea of how they went about their daily business. Dioramas also exhibit the extinct megafauna of the plains during the Pleistocene era: the American mastodon, American lion, smilodons and many others. Educators talk about what life was like living on the prairie centuries ago, and how the people coped in times of hardship. Before heading towards the exit, you pass a huge timeline on the wall listing important events in the history of America’s Great Plains.

    Burrowing Owls
    After exiting the History of the Great American Prairie building, you see what appears to be a large, netted enclosure in the distance, looming behind towering orange rock formations and shrouded in a clump of huge, dark green bur oak trees. There is a fork in the path ahead. To your right, a wheelchair-accessible ramp rolls down, right, and around a boulder, ending at the entrance of the exhibit. Next to the ramp is a five-step stairway which also leads to the front of the enclosure. A zoo employee warmly greets you with a quick nod and a smile while opening the glass doors for the arriving guests.

    Inside, you immediately start twisting your head about, taking in the sights and sounds. You are surrounded by rock: the walls are rock, the ceiling is rock, and the floor is studded with jagged stones and rock slabs. You then realize that you are at the end of a cave corridor. A closer inspection of the walls’ crevices and ledges reveal the bones of small rodents, the ripped-up remains of crickets, and what appears to be a bird’s regurgitated pellets. A series of holes have been dug into the corners of the room, tunneling deep into the ground, but it is clear that prairie dogs do not live here. You then hear a few distant hoo-HOOH… hoo-HOOH and h-h-RHH, t-chk, t-chk, t-chk calls, and decide to head forward.

    A set of plantation-style doors (or at least similar to it), which have six wooden horizontal slats each, and criss-crossing wire mesh between them, corrals you into a [roughly] fifteen-foot [tall] by thirty-foot [long] canyon, where a second set of plantation doors, identical to the first, confines you in a small “cage.” The rock ceiling has vanished and is replaced by netting. Through this netting, you can see the blue sky, which is screened over by the exterior mesh of the exhibit. This area is meant to ensure that no animals escape or even have a chance to.

    Once out of the gorge, you are startled by a small, white-spotted, brown head poking out of the brush. Its bright, unblinking yellow eyes are accentuated by thick, white “eyebrows.” It is a Northern burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), cocking its head left and right as it peers at you inquisitively. Its furrowed brows make it seem as though it is scowling at you, almost as if it were human. Then, as quickly as it appeared, it bolts into the nearby brush and out of sight. You continue on through the exhibit.

    Here, the rocks, which act as the primary barrier in the enclosure, are much shorter, at heights of 30-36 inches. Their relatively flat, smooth tops are 36-42 inches wide, and thick clusters of sagebrush have been planted on the other side to ensure that visitors stay out. The exhibit very accurately replicates the natural habitat of the burrowing owls it houses, the semi-arid prairies of the central United States. Tufts of prairie dropseed and galleta grass protrude from the khaki-colored earth, while patches of tall Indian grass and short, slender Eastern red cedars dot the outer rim of the aviary. Wheat-colored dead trees and their broken, spindling branches offer lookout posts for the owls.

    The landscaping of the exhibit is varied. The majority of the exhibit is rolling dunes, however, there are areas where the ground is flat, and more densely planted. There are craters in the dirt as well. A continuation of the rock cave you came out of, a colossal escarpment makes up almost the entire back side of the enclosure. An overhang allows shade for the owls, while miniature mesas give them additional perches. Looking left and right, you see a large number of the burrowing owls throughout the exhibit atop these rocks, all of them eyeing you intently.

    Tiny piles of dirt scattered across the ground mark the entrances and exits to the burrowing owls’ burrows. The burrows were pre-made and run through the length of the exhibit. You smile as a pair of owls runs in and out of the burrow, almost as if they were playing a game of tag. Nearby, two glass-fronted viewing areas are in front of a few of the tunnels, allowing guests to view the owls scamper around underground. In front of these windows is a small staircase that leads you into another viewing area, one that is actually under the owls. Here, there are the bubble domes found in most prairie dog exhibits, accompanied by another set of glass windows that face more of the underground passageways. One window gives you a look at the owls both above ground and below it. You decide that it is finally time to leave the burrowing owls, and make your way out of the exhibit.

    *Burrowing Owl Feeding Frenzy*
    Live feedings, along with zookeeper talks would take place twice a day in the burrowing owl exhibit. Known as the Burrowing Owl Feeding Frenzy, this fun experience would enable guests to watch a burrowing owl hunt in action. Small rodents and lizards would be released into the exhibit, with burrowing owls scurrying right behind them in hot pursuit. Short retractable fences would be put up before feeding shows, preventing any prey animals from escaping.

    After passing through two pairs of plantation doors, just like before, you find yourself once again in the entryway of a cave. You hear crickets chirping and the hoots of the owls. You sigh, wishing you could’ve stayed longer. But there’s much more to be seen on this journey across America’s Great Prairie, much more to explore. Another zoo employee is there to hold the door open for you, but you are practically storming out in anticipation.

    Wild Turkeys
    Just outside of the exit to burrowing owl exhibit, there is another split in the pathway. You choose to go to the right once again. This route is very picturesque, almost like a boulevard; with rows of colorful trees and bushes running parallel to the path. At your right is the edge of a small cliff, presumably there to keep guests out of the undeveloped land surrounding the exhibit. To the left is a three-rail mortised split-rail fence that runs the length of the path with wire mesh between its rails. Inside of the exhibit, the ground is carpeted with bluebunch wheatgrass, with a few maple trees scattered around. The exhibit is very spacious, and includes a large pool at the center. A long, hollow, mossy log sits nearby. The outer fringes of the exhibit are heavily planted with a variety of bushes and other plants including Baldwin’s ironweed. Three benches are up against the cliffside for viewing of the exhibit.

    However, nothing stirs. You are not yet sure what lives here, but you are convinced that it would be a suitable enclosure for a deer or something similar. Then you hear the distinctive gobble of a turkey (Meleagirs gallopavo intermedia), and you see an absolutely huge tom stride into view. He is very impressive, with a full fan of white- and brown-tipped feathers, a robust figure, and a brilliant contrast of colors between his snood and his bright-blue face. He settles himself directly in front of you, and remains still. Following close behind is a group of hens, probably the hens he has mated with. And then another memorable experience; you notice a few poults, or baby turkeys, accompanying the hens. Considering how big their father is, you cannot believe how tiny they are. The tom gobbles again, as if he were giving orders, and the parade of turkeys marches away.

    Great American Prairie Aviary
    Down the path, you spot another aviary ahead. Stepping inside the big netted exhibit, you gasp in awe at the gorgeous forest habitat, seemingly cut right out of the wilderness and placed indoors. Beautiful red bud trees, cedars, oaks and maples are among the many species of trees inside, which shelter mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus), Northern flicker woodpeckers (Colaptes auratus), Northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos), yellow-breasted chats (Icteria virens), Western meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis). The aviary entrance is level with the ground; however the remainder of the aviary runs off the edge of a short cliff, meaning once you walk in, you are eye-to-eye with the birds in the treetops. High walkways go in between the huge trees, and then wind downwards toward the floor. From here, you can spot plains bobwhite quails (Colinus virginianus taylori) and scaled quails (Callipepla squamata) trotting among the leaf litter.

    On the ground, the aviary is lushly planted, aside from a few clearings where beautiful ponds lie. A lovely assortment of flowers create a magnificent mosaic of foliage on the forest floor, one with dark purples, vivid yellows, fiery reds, and many other colors and hues.

    The High Plains
    Going left at the second split in the path (at the burrowing owl exhibit) leads you to the High Plains section of the complex. At your right, there is a semi-circle pathway overlooking an enormous watering hole in a moated exhibit; the sides are steep, keeping the animals inside. A trio of male pronghorn (Antilocapra americana americana) stops before you to drink. Further ahead, the exhibit continues, running adjacent to the pathway. This passage has only one tree in it, a small silver maple right in the center, surrounded by tall needle-and-thread grass and bluebunch wheatgrass. Towards the back of this section are a few piles of large rocks, with a higher, steeper cliffside acting as another barrier. Surrounding the exhibit is thick forest.

    To the left, a little loop runs off of the main path. This area addresses the misconception of calling pronghorn antelope, when they really are not antelope at all. Close by is a very realistic, life-size male pronghorn sculpture and another sign showing you the differences between pronghorn and true antelope species. It also explains what features characterize an antelope, why pronghorn have their own separate family and are not considered an antelope species, and the variations between antelope species, including full-size bronze models of different antelope horns.

    The path turns left, giving you a spectacular view of a wide open plain, the extension of the smaller passage you walked by a moment ago. The golden-yellow coloration of the grass intensifies in the light of the sun. Huge, lumbering plains bison (Bison bison bison) patrol the enclosure, while young pronghorn gallop around, their mothers right on their heels, ready to protect them if something goes wrong. This section of the exhibit is nearly treeless as well, with the only exceptions being tall, slim cottonwood trees sporadically-planted at the edges of the enclosure.

    After the viewing area, the path quickly jerks left again. In the middle of u-turn are dense trees and foliage, planted there to prevent guests from seeing the path on the other side where the pronghorn/antelope comparison area was. The prairie, however, becomes wider, with its fencing following the pathway, further expanding the exhibit. A very pleasant water feature, separated from the pronghorn and bison by rockwork, contains a nice collection of aquatic animals of North America, including the blue-winged teal (Anas discors), the snowy egret (Egretta thula) the Western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii), and the common musk turtle (Sternotherus odoratus). The pond is densely planted, with reeds and other aquatic plants poking out from the surface. At the center of the pond, a bunch of intertwined branches sits on a bank. The egrets and ducks can perch here, while a large log gives the turtles a spot to bask on. A smaller exhibit is located behind the former; it contains smooth softshell turtles (Apalone mutica) and American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeiana). Thick grasses and rockwork act as the main barriers. The exhibit has mossy logs and a white, sandy bank for the softshells to rest on.

    Having focused all of your attention on the many species in the pond, you barely notice a mother canvasback (Aythya valisineria) leading her orderly bunch of ducklings across the path. You come to an abrupt stop and watch them disappear into the surrounding brush.

    Before the pond exhibits, there was a section trailing off to the left. This small area was another educational spot; this one compared the two subspecies of the American bison: the wood bison and the plains bison. Life-size sculptures are here as well, and a chart shows the most dramatic differences between the two, such as the enormous hump at the front of the back found in wood bison, and the larger bonnet and beard found on the plains bison. The next section is dedicated to the recovering of the bison population after they nearly went extinct in the late 1800s.

    As the trail rejoins the main path, another exhibit can be found on your left. It supposedly houses alligator snapping turtles (Macrochelys temminckii), but they are nowhere to be found. A wide, brownish-green pool is up front, with thick grasses, reeds, logs, and rocks found on the sandy and muddy banks surrounding it.

    You head down a ramp, which leads to level viewing of the alligator snapping turtle enclosure and the two pond enclosures. Straight ahead, over a rock fence similar to the ones in the burrowing owl exhibit, is a moated exhibit for Kansas white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus macrourus). A thin creek, which stared in the snapping turtle area and ran next to the path before cascading into the deer exhibit, divides the enclosure into two areas: a wooded area on the left, an open plain on the right. The path, before turning right, stops at a nice overlook of the exhibit. A doe and her fawn are grazing by the creek, while an impressive buck scent-marks his territory. As you step closer to the fence, the buck, the doe, and the fawn all immediately turn their heads toward you. In unison, they dart into the woods, under the bridge you walked over previously, presumably to where their night quarters are located. Their white flicking tails are the last thing you see as the docile creatures flee.

    You walk along a corridor in between the deer and the continued section of the bison and pronghorn exhibit. After passing a large rock formation on your right, you pass a dusty black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) exhibit dotted with sagebrush, Indian grass and tufts of galleta grass. A dead tree stands off to the side of the exhibit, and branches are along the edges. A small tunnel in the rock barrier allows you go into a few bubble viewing domes to get closer to the prairie dogs. A pair comes right up to the glass, undeterred by your presence. They go about eating their grass, almost as if you were not even there. The exhibit has plenty of rocks for the prairie dogs to lookout from, and a huge network of burrows underground. Glass windows outside of the bubble area give you a chance to see the prairie dogs in their tunnels, like with the burrowing owl exhibit. A nice feature of the exhibit is that you can still see the bison and pronghorn walking around in the background while prairie dogs play in the foreground.

    Next door to the prairie dogs is a similar, but smaller, paddock for ornate box turtles (Terrapene ornata ornata), with foliage hiding the rock barriers. A pool is towards the back left, while the entrance to a burrow and a nest area lie behind stalks of Indian grass to the right.

    Forest Exhibits
    Straight ahead, there is the entrance to a path looping around a vast turkey vulture (Cathartes aura septentrionalis) aviary. There are trees along the outside of the exhibit, while the interior is more sparsely-planted. It has a few cedars and dead trees for the vultures to perch on, along with large boulders and tree stumps. Fake carcasses filled with meats of various creatures would occasionally be left out for the vultures to feed on.

    After walking around the aviary, you are back on the main path. To the right is a cave tunnel. Inside, there are terrariums for the Western hognose snake (Heterodon nasicus), the Eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos), the speckled kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula holbrooki), the prairie kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix), and the Western massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus tergeminus). A nice mixed species terrarium houses Texas horned lizards (Phrynosoma cornutum), Great Plains skinks (Eumeces obsoletus), and Northern prairie skinks (Eumeces septentrionalis septentrionalis).

    Outside of the tunnel, there are spacious aviaries for American kestrels (Falco sparverius) and Northern saw-whet owls (Aegolius acadicus). The kestrels have a moderately-wooded aviary with many perches. Zookeeper demonstrations would occur once a day inside the exhibit, and occasionally a kestrel would be taken out to be viewed up-close by visitors. A handler would answer questions while having the kestrel perched on his/her wrist. The owl exhibit is dense; a forest of oaks, cedars and firs. Live feedings and demonstrations would also take place at this exhibit. Another path loop leads you in front of the aviaries.

    After passing the turkey vultures again, you walk down a path leading you past the last few exhibits of the complex. Across from the deer is an evenly-wooded exhibit for greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida). A pair struts by, their conspicuous red caps being the only things preventing them from completely blending in to their surroundings. The grass is taller in this exhibit than any other you have seen, but you are still able to make out a chick, camouflaged with yellowish-brown plumage, at its mother’s side.

    The back of the exhibit is more marsh-like; the ground is muddy, mossy logs and rocks plentiful, and murky ponds outlined with reeds are inhabited by American bitterns (Botaurus lentiginosus).

    The path takes you behind the sage grouse and prairie chicken field, where you find an American badger (Taxidea taxus) enclosure. It is a lightly planted clearing with the zoo ground’s natural woodlands acting as the backdrop. Salt-desert shrubs and grama grass are the primary plant species in the exhibit, with large patches of silvery dirt making up the rest of the terrain. The entrance to a burrow is right up front near the guest viewing area. A solitary male trudges through the light brush and over the many rocks slabs in the exhibit. He snarls, showing off his impressive fangs. He then lethargically slips into his burrow, and the area falls silent.

    The winding paths that follow take you through a small area of untouched, natural forest, where native species live. The path ends at the entrance to the gift shop, where you buy a souvenir to remember your experience by. You leave the Great American Prairie, and go on to visit another section of the zoo, hoping it is just as exciting...



    This is what I expect! Of course, they don't need to be this long, but just give us something juicy! :p Can't wait to hear the rest of your ideas!
     
    Last edited: 5 Sep 2012
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  3. BeardsleyZooFan

    BeardsleyZooFan Well-Known Member

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    Aww, that hurts!:p
    I might post an exhibit on here sometime later this week.
     
  4. AnaheimZoo

    AnaheimZoo Well-Known Member

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    Oh, no, BZF, it wasn't directed at you! :(/:D I was tired of all of the competition threads as well, even though they produced some of the best exhibit designs that exist on the forum. I just much rather have our "designers" post whenever they want, with no limits (in terms of species, zoo size, etc.). :)
     
  5. Moebelle

    Moebelle Well-Known Member

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    Are created maps of exhibits allowed?
     
  6. AnaheimZoo

    AnaheimZoo Well-Known Member

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    If it's an idea based off of any Zoo Tycoon game, then no. Anything else I guess is okay. But add a description at least, if you can. :) Sorry I'm being so picky. :p
     
  7. Gforrestersmith

    Gforrestersmith Well-Known Member

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    How can I mention the animal species without a list?
     
  8. AnaheimZoo

    AnaheimZoo Well-Known Member

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    Do you see my example? That's what I'm expecting. I'm not saying you can't mention the species without a list, it's just that all you ever do is post lists, and then you call them "ideas". Once again, lists aren't creative. You need more than just what animals are going to be in the exhibit. I want to know about the exhibits, too. Go ahead. Make more of your incredible lists! I'm sure we'd all love to see more of them, Sir Gforrestersmith of Trolliston, Oregon.

    I can't believe I'm saying it, but I'd love it if our old pal yorik would pay our thread a visit! :rolleyes:
     
  9. Gforrestersmith

    Gforrestersmith Well-Known Member

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    So what you're saying is that I also have to mention what the exhibit will look?

    Im Sorry about the Lists. Will you please forgive me?
     
  10. BeardsleyZooFan

    BeardsleyZooFan Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to Wonders of the African Forest. In this exhibit you'll find why this area is considered a biodiversity hotspot that holds marvelous treasures. As you enter the exhibit, there are live trees and bamboo densely planted everywhere, surrounding you, and mist comes from hidden machines. One thing you notice immediately while entering this exhibit is mesh netting above you. This allows 2.3 Mantled Guerezas, 1.3 Wolf's Guenons, and 1.2 DeBrazza's Monkeys to travel above your heads and traverse to different exhibits, somewhat similar to Philadelphia's program, only more close-up. One of the exhibits the monkeys can travel to is the first exhibit you see. You view from what seems just like bushes, but the bushes hide a barrier fence. It is a very large grassy pen containing 1.1 African Forest Buffalo, 1.1 Red River Hogs, 1.3 Bongos, and 1.2 Yellow-Backed Duikers. Nearly invisible cable wires separate you from the hoofstock. The exhibit has several trees and other climbing opportunities too because as mentioned earlier, the monkeys can come into this exhibit. This exhibit mostly focuses on how different hoofstock share the African rainforest together.
    As you walk past the hoofstock exhibit, you notice doors that lead you to a building. You enter the doors, and you are suddenly in a tunnel. As you walk through the tunnel, signs everywhere point out facts about gorillas on both sides of the tunnel. They explain everything someone might want to know about gorillas, including their diet, their lifestyles, personal insiders on the zoo's gorillas, but the main idea is the threats that gorillas face in the wild, and the zoo's conservation efforts in the real forests of Africa to save them. The tunnel suddenly has glass viewing on two sides, and through that you can see two gorilla habitats. One side of the glass features one troop of gorillas, and the other side has another gorilla troop. Both troops have 1.3 Western Lowland Gorillas. The 2 troops can view each other through the tunnel, providing visual enrichment. Both exhibits are lushly planted with many trees. Some trees are hotwired to have an authentic rainforest feel, but a good amount have no hot wire on them and provide great climbing opportunities for the gorillas. There are also many enrichment opportunities, with fake termite mounds and holes in trees to place enrichment in them, and treats can also be placed throughout both of the spacious exhibits, on the ground and on trees or logs, and sometimes the gorillas even have to think of how to get treats without getting wet when food is placed in small ponds! Guests are awestruck at having gorillas on both sides of them. The Guerezas, Guenons, and DeBrazza's Monkeys also have access to both of the gorilla habitats, providing more multispecies enrichment. The monkeys also have access to some places that the gorillas can't reach for their safety. As you keep on going through the building, you see the indoor area for the gorilla troop. It is very large unlike most indoor gorilla exhibits, and seems mostly naturalistic, with a rocky backdrop and natural substrate. There are vines, ropes, and other climbing materials. There is also a very large artificial tree.
    After leaving the gorilla building, you are granted an outdoor view of one of the gorilla troops from across a moat. You go along, reading signage along the way with facts about the African Rainforest and its resources. Then you see a huge lake, with two massive islands on them. You see the islands from across the water, but the islands are close up. One island houses 2.5 Bonobos, and the other one is home to a bachelor group of 4.0 Chimpanzees. The two groups of primates can view each other from the islands, but are protected from each other by the water that surrounds the two islands. The monkeys do not have access to this island for their own safety. After leaving the viewing points for the islands, you walk on to see an interpretation of Jane Goodall's base camp that guests can enter and explore. Visitors can flip open notebooks to see notes on chimps, and have a look around what her camp looked like. When you leave the camp, you come to a glass-fronted viewing area of another base camp. However, this one is chimp-proofed, and chimps can come to this base camp and explore what keepers have put there for them. In the background of the camp, you see the rest of the exhibit, a lush grassy area. When you move away from this base camp viewing area, you see more glass viewing for the chimps, but this time, it's viewing into their lush habitat. This exhibit houses a 1.4 Chimpanzees. The male is separate from the bachelor group as he is the alpha male and has underrepresented genes in North American zoos. When you leave that glass window, you get one more glimpse of the chimps. This view is similar to one of the views of the gorillas at Busch Gardens Tampa's Myombe Reserve, where you look at the gorillas from a barrier fence.
    When you pull yourself from the chimps, you see doors that lead to another tunnel. However, this tunnel has glass on both sides of you, and over your head. The exhibit has many trees, and plants everywhere. This makes it hard to see the animals in the exhibit, but some tree branches lean over the top of the tunnel, so if the animal chooses to climb, you might see it above your head. This exhibit has 1.1 spotted African Leopards. The leopards are rotated on exhibit unless the female is in estrus, which means the zoo will exhibit them together to breed. This unique tunnel could allow a leopard to be right next to you, or even right above your head! At the end of this tunnel are doors that are the entry to a building.
    When you first enter the building, there is a nocturnal exhibit to your right. It features 5.14 Egyptian Fruit Bats and 1.1 African Brush-Tailed Porcupines. This mixture of species is perfectly fine as the bats tend to hang around the trees and stalactites, and the porcupines prefer the ground. The viewing area is glass-fronted like all other exhibits in this building, allowing for close encounters between person and animal. Next is a vertically tall terrarium for 1.0 Western Green Mamba. Then there is an aviary for 1.4 Congo Peafowl, 1.1 African Pygmy Geese, 1.1 White-Crested Hornbills, 1.1 African Gray Parrots, and 2.6 Lady Ross' Turacos. There is a large rocky terrarium with 1.0 African Rock Python. As you keep going on, you see an exhibit for a rarely-exhibited species: 1.1 African Palm Civets. The palm civets have an enclosure with many branches and platforms for them to climb on, and a few boxes for them to hide in and feel secure in. After this exhibit, you approach a sort-of odd-looking exhibit. It looks like a normal African rainforest riverbank, but there is a tall wall of plexiglass that divides the exhibit. One half has a large amount of rocky land area and half of the large pool, and the other half of the exhibit has half of the pool and a smaller amount of space. The first half that was mentioned is home to 1.1 African Clawless Otters, and the second half has 1.0 Dwarf Crocodile. The plexiglass might look odd, but it allows the otters and crocodile to see each other and interact with each other like they might in the wild, but has plexiglass for the safety of both animals. The last stop in the building is a large indoor forest with the Guerezas, Guenons, and DeBrazza's Monkeys that can travel to different exhibits. This exhibit is where monkeys can stay during inclement weather. The exhibit has ropes, nets, vines, and a huge artificial tree with holes in it so the monkeys can get treats for enrichment. There is one last viewing area, this time with mesh netting for the monkeys. Keepers can come here and do training demonstrations with the monkeys.
    You exit the building to find yourself in another tunnel similar to the leopard tunnel. However, you're completely surprised, as this tunnel is entirely underwater, which you did not expect. This exhibit is home to 1.1 Pygmy Hippopotamuses and 0.0.235 African Cichlids. This tunnel gives you the one-of-a-kind experience to have a hippo swim on your left, right, or even above you. Colorful cichlids add to the visual appeal of this exhibit. In the background, separated by strong glass, you can see otters swimming behind the hippos and recognize the otters have an outdoor area, and it seems as if the otters share one space with the hippos and fish. As you exit the tunnel and walk along, there is an above-water viewing area for the hippos if they aren't in the water, you want to see them from another angle, or you want to check out the hippos' neighbors in this habitat, 3.4 Allen's Swamp Monkeys. To add to this experience, the Guerezas, Guenons, and DeBrazza's Monkeys can also come to this exhibit to visit their monkey friends, the Swamp Monkeys. However, the Swamp Monkeys are restricted to this exhibit.
    As you force yourself to depart from the glorious hippos, you see elevated viewing for the clawless otter outdoor area. The exhibit is grassy with some rocks, and you can see their pool is massive, and is sometimes stocked with trout to provide live enrichment. When you leave, you see another set of doors, but they don't lead to another building. These doors lead you to a large outdoor walk-thru aviary. This aviary is home to 5.6 Abdim's Storks, 1.1 Shoebill Storks, 1.1 Hammerkops, 2.6 Yellow-Billed Storks, and a large colony of Greater Flamingos, totaling in at about 45.63 individuals. In addition, for an extra fee of $5, you can hand feed the flamingoes pellets. Guests are asked to stick to the path and not go to the pond, as a good amount of flamingoes normally come to visitors to get fed. All the money spent to feed the flamingoes is used to support conservation of African rainforests.
    You realize your journey in the Wonders of the African Forest is coming to an end. However, there are some special treats in store for you before you leave. A row of 5 spacious, natural Okapi exhibits are the last group of habitats in this exhibit. Each habitat has 1.1 Okapis on exhibit at a time, making for 5.5 Okapis overall that are on exhibit. In addition, the zoo houses an extra number of 3.3 Okapis not on public display. The huge overall number of 8.8 Okapis are rotated to different exhibits so each pair of Okapis will be on exhibit at least every other day. For an extra fee of $30.99, you can book an Okapi Encounter Program. This program allows you to go behind-the-scenes of the okapi exhibits, learn all about okapis, and get the chance to feed and pet them. 75% of the money used to purchase Okapi Encounters goes to supporting African rainforest conservation programs. All of the Okapis that take part in this program are members of the 3 pairs that are not on exhibit that day, and each Okapi pair has normally 2 encounters a day, with normally 6 encounters a day. The maximum group size is 6. If Okapis do not feel like being interacted with, then they are not forced to participate, and 25% of the visitor's money is refunded. Okapis with offspring are not interacted with.
    You leave Wonders of the African Forest with a new way of thinking. You know more about the rainforest itself, its inhabitants, the threats facing it, and how to help this amazing ecosystem. After encountering some of the forest's marvelous residents, such as primates, hoofstock, cats, birds, and more, you have a new respect for this amazing spot on Earth.
    Species list in Alphabetical Order:
    Abdim's Stork
    African Brush-Tailed Porcupine
    African Cichlid
    African Clawless Otter
    African Forest Buffalo
    African Gray Parrot
    African Leopard
    African Pygmy Geese
    African Rock Python
    Allen's Swamp Monkey
    Bongo*
    Bonobo*
    Chimpanzee*
    Congo Peafowl
    DeBrazza's Monkey*
    Dwarf Crocodile
    Egyptian Fruit Bat
    Greater Flamingo
    Hammerkop
    Lady Ross' Turaco
    Mantled Guereza
    Okapi*
    Pygmy Hippopotamus*
    Red River Hog*
    Shoebill Stork
    Western Green Mamba
    Western Lowland Gorilla*
    White-Crested Hornbill
    Wolf's Guenon*
    Yellow-Backed Duiker
    Yellow-Billed Stork
    *Indicates SSP Animal (Inspired by jbnsn99)
    Thanks for reading!
     
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  11. Gforrestersmith

    Gforrestersmith Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23 Sep 2011
    Posts:
    131
    Location:
    Hermiston, Oregon, US
    Ok heres an Idea for an Indonesia Exhibit and this time no Lists.

    Elephant and Rhino House:

    This area is the first area you see when entering the Exhibit. This area is home to a nice Indoor and Outdoor Habitats for Asian Elephants and Sumatran Rhinos on each sides of the Building.

    Jungle Swamp:

    Before entering the Building you'll see the Habitat for Malayan Tapir and Reeves Muntjac. Then when you enter the Building you'll see the Habitat for Indian Mongooses. Finally after seeing the Sulawesi Hawk Eagle get ready to see Reptiles including two species of Crocodilians- the Saltwater Crocodile and the False Gharial; they both share their habitats with Pig Nosed Turtles, Softshell Turtles, Malayan Box Turtles, River Terrapin, Painted Terrapin, Barramundi, Asian Arowana and Giant Gourmai. There are also two species of Large Snakes- the Reticulated Python and the Burmese Python; the Archerfish and RainbowFish live in the Burmese Python Habitat. Other Reptiles include the Asian Water Monitor, Green Tree Monitor, Clouded Monitor, Snake Necked Turtle, King Cobra, Mangrove Snake, Waglers Palm Viper and Asian Vine Snake. Also see the Habitat for the Fishing Cat. After exiting the Building, see the Babirusa and Visayan Warty Pigs.

    Tiger Trail:

    The first Animals you see in this Area are the Sambar Deer, which is a favorite prey of Tigers. You'll finally see the Sumatran Tigers nearby as well as the Habitat for Sun Bears next door. After seeing the Habitat for Lowland Anoa and Asian Small Clawed Otters you'll see more animals as you go along. These include the Clouded Leopard, Asian Golden Cat, Binturong, Asian Palm Civet, Dhole, Yellow Throated Marten and the Komodo Dragon.

    Orangutan Land:

    This is the Primate Area of the Exhibit. The Main Attraction is the Family of Orangutans. Other Primates Include White Handed Gibbons, Siamangs, Lion Tailed Macaque, Pig Tailed Macaque, Silvery Lutung and Sunda Loris. Other animals include Tree Shrews and Sunda Pangolins.

    Aviary:

    This area has many species of Birds roaming Free. Species include the Following:

    Note: this is the only list I'm doing on this Forum.

    List of Birds:
    Rhinoceros Hornbill
    Wrinkled Hornbill
    Great Indian Hornbill
    Wreathed Hornbill
    Jungle Fowl
    Ocellated Turkey
    Bali Mynah
    Hill Mynah
    Emerald Staring
    Emerald Dove
    Nicobar Pigeon
    Cattle Egret
    Whistling Duck

    Other Animals that live in the Aviary include Greater Chevrotian, Forsten Tortoise and Asian Forest Tortoise.


    Australian Jungle:

    The Last Area of the Exhibit. This is home to a Tree Kangaroo Habitat, a Cassowary Habitat, some Parrot Cages a Lorikeet Feeding Aviary and a Goanna Habitat.

    How do you think?

    Thanks for Reading.
     
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  12. Ituri

    Ituri Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    2,445
    Location:
    Kansas
    Those starlings and mynas will make great snacks for the large hornbill species. Also, ocellated turkeys are from Mexico.

    ;)
     
  13. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    tomorrow
    @jbnbsn99: amazing. I don't often read the imaginary zoo threads (or rather I often give them a glance just in case and then move on) but that is knock-one's-socks-off good. I might suggest adding in Chacoan mara as well; and are there still Galapagos doves in captivity which you might add? My only real "criticism" is that it is only imaginary and not really going to be built.......unless you can convince your bosses I guess :D

    @Gforrestersmith: that is more like it, well done. Perhaps swap the ocellated turkeys for ocellated argus (I assume that is what you meant), and as Ituri says the hornbills will likely eat your small birds. Also change the name to Southeast Asia or something, because not all your animals come from Indonesia (e.g. lion-tailed macaque)
     
  14. Gforrestersmith

    Gforrestersmith Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23 Sep 2011
    Posts:
    131
    Location:
    Hermiston, Oregon, US
    Thanks. I did mean Ocellated Argus. Where in the exhibit should I put the Bali Mynahs? They are a both beautiful and yet endangered species.
     
  15. BeardsleyZooFan

    BeardsleyZooFan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Jul 2011
    Posts:
    3,752
    Location:
    CT, United States
    My zoo is making a South American exhibit, and seeing this made me think of how small my zoo's plans are.:eek: Every zoo should be honored to have this exhibit. Of course, in most zoo's eyes, a good South American exhibit will consist of a ruined temple theme, put a couple of birds and monkeys in an aviary, add some herpetariums for snakes, lizards and tortoises, and then an exhibit for either an ocelot or jaguar. And maybe throw in an exhibit for anteater/capybara/tapir.:p
     
  16. 6647

    6647 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2012
    Posts:
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    Location:
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    Survival on The Steppe



    You've just entered the zoo. The first actual exhibit seems to be on the right, up a long hill. You sigh upon seeing the height of the hill, but the cold drink you purchased at the entry plaza keeps you going.

    As you enter, you walk under a wooden archway that says in white letters "Survival on The Steppe". Up ahead is a large yurt. Upon entering, you see a small giftshop in the first section, filled with racks of replica ancient Mongol tools and maps, and stuffed plush camels and horses.

    The second room's walls are covered in dioramas and maps, explaining that all the animals in the exhibit, and even the building you're in all originate from the vast Eurasian Steppe, which overlaps from Mongolia and China into Kazakhstan and southern Russia. All the animals are designed to live here. Over millions of years of evolution, their features have been fine tuned to survive here, in what seems to be a barren wasteland, with a unusual mixture of hot and cold. Your impressed, but it's time to see the animals.

    As you exit, you are surprised. Although you walked up a hill, the top seems almost completely flat. It is very quiet, and feels almost surreal. Noisemaker machines hidden in several bushes on the left side of the pathway simulate the ongoing wisping noise of strong winds flowing over the Steppe. The pathway is outlined by rough cobblestone, but the inner pathway is regular sidewalk cement. The grass in the area is dark and sparse. The whole area seems cold and dry, even though it's sunny out. The exhibits seem to be a slightly lower elevation than the the pathway area, to keep the animals from jumping into the pathway, if the fence isn't enough. There is also a 10 foot wide moat seperating the animals from the fence. It looks to be almost 2 feet deep.

    You come up to the first paddock. It's sandier than the terrain around the path. You look across a sparse meadow, and see Goitered Gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa)along with medium sized equids browsing the small bushes and grazing on tall grass. By reading the graphic flipbooks lined on the wooden railing, you find out that these are Onagers (Equus hemionus). They are closely related to domestic donkeys. You find out that they are the fastest species of wild ass, and can reach almost 45 miles per hour in a short burst. You are fascinated, but you move on.

    The next one is a little lusher, and when you walk up and see the animals, you think they are also Onagers. But as they get trot closer, you see they are different. They are a darker shade of orange-brown, and turn out to be Przewalski's Wild Horses (Equus przewalski), or Takhis. You discover they were once extinct in the wild, and only 12 were left in the world. Since then, conservation efforts have reintroduced them, and helped the population grow. This give you a taste of what conservation can do.

    Next, you pass two more large enclosures. In one are shaggy silhouettes with two large back humps. You recognize them as Bactrian Camels (Camelus bactrianus). The flipbooks state that even though camels are usually thought of as desert animals, Bactrian Camels can be found roaming through both snow and sand on the Steppe. Over 2 million domestic camels exist, but only a small number of wild ones are still alive. Sharing space with the camels are odd looking Saiga Antelope (Saigi tatarica). They are small, and limber looking, but have tapir-like trunk noses on their faces. After viewing these critically endangered species, you peer into the other exhibit.

    Looking back at you curiously are large Bactrian Deer (Cervus bactrianus). Both stags and hinds graze here, and several are lined up to drink from the moat. Dotting this enclosure are rocky mounds. For a moment, you wonder why. But then you see that the deer are not alone in the exhibit. Chukar Partridges (Alectoris chukar) live here as well. A sign on the fence states that the deer, antelope, and camels rotate every other day, and the partridges are free to go wherever they feel. However, the prefer the rocky enclosure, as it provides a nice roosting and nesting place.

    Coming near the end of the area, you see another Yurt up ahead. On the way, you notice a prairie dog pit with underground viewing, but judging from the signs, residing in these tunnels are Alashan Ground Squirrels (Spermophilus alashanicus) and Przewalski's Steppe Lemmings (Eolagurus przewalskii). Several of the fidgety little rodents are basking in the sun, and some of the fellow zoo goers next to you are "Aww"-ing at the sight. Luckily, you do manage to see one underground, but it is only for an instant. Moving on, you approach the yurt.

    Before you enter, you look to the wall next on your right. The central smaller hill of the exhibit seems to have replica dinosaur fossils part way embedded into the side of the hill. Interesting, but you want to see what's inside.

    Again, there is a distraction before you enter. An mesh enclosure for the nimble Corsac Fox (Vulpes corsac). It looks to be around 15 x 15 feet in length and width. There are logs and rocks for the fox to hide in and look for food. You open the door of the yurt.

    Inside seems to be a recreated paleontologist research hut. Replica models, bones, and dioramas relating to extinct Steppe animals like the Steppe Wisent and extinct Gobi animals like the Velociraptor are everywhere. Oohs and aahs come from the visitors inside, and as you look around, you see a map of the exhibit, and realize you've come to the end. After you exit, you see the yurt from earlier, and start back down the hill.

    You leave with a feeling of wonder and discovery in your mind, amazed at the animals, both extinct and alive, of the spectacular Steppe of Eurasia.
     
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  17. 6647

    6647 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    196
    Location:
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    Made sense to put it here instead of Design a Zoo.

    Not very good, but not my best, either. Oh well. :)
     
  18. Pacarana

    Pacarana Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Aug 2011
    Posts:
    197
    Location:
    US
    Chacoan mara's are not listed in any AZA zoos but I know of a couple private breeders that have invested in them. I'd say a good handful of private breeders have at least a pair. Apparently their know starting to rival their cousins, the patagonian mara. While the Chaco's are quite rare and expensive in the trade, the patagonians are more skittish and less "tamable" than the chacoans.
     
  19. Moebelle

    Moebelle Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15 Jun 2011
    Posts:
    2,849
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Coming soon........ after a successful design of aSoutheast Asian river boat ride, now will come.....River Adventures Through Central Africa.
     
  20. BeardsleyZooFan

    BeardsleyZooFan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Jul 2011
    Posts:
    3,752
    Location:
    CT, United States
    Moebelle, where is this Southeast Asian River Boat Ride Thingy located on the forum? I'm interested in reading it...