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Adelaide Zoo Dwarf Mongoose

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Ara, 25 Jun 2007.

  1. Ara

    Ara Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know if Adelaide zoo still have their Dwarf Mongoose colony?

    In 2002 they had 8 males and 6 females.
    By last year they were down to 4 males and 4 females.

    Adelaide have been battling along to keep the colony going for years, and it's a shame that no other zoos in the region seem interested in them.

    These days it seems that if an animal is not big and "box-office" then most zoos just don't want to know.
     
  2. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

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    actually ara, i think you'll find dwarf mongooses are just one of many species that are being intentionally phased-out by the regions zoos.

    no doubt you are right that it has a lot to do with other zoos not interested in displaying the species, but thats not that supprising considering almost every other zoo is involved in well managed program for another african mongoose species - the meerkat.

    we all have our favorites and nobody here on the forum is immune from occasional bouts of but-why-can't-we-keep feaver (i'm a jaguar man myself), but i reality its very much all for the best. particuarly in our region, with so few decent-sized institutions, its best australiasian zoos manage fewer, more productive and effective programs than continuing to spreading their resources over a wide range of species.

    i think provided our zoos select their species wisely, their collections
    can continue to represent i wide range of mammalian diversity, albeit with maybe fewer examples of such.

    just remember the concession for phasing-out dwarf mongooses is that the future of another species within our regions zoos is better secured.
     
    Last edited: 25 Jun 2007
  3. Coquinguy

    Coquinguy Well-Known Member

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    and also, government departments are, justifiable wary about this species escaping and becoming a potential pest. whatever the likelihood of this is happening, the regions zoos would be fighting an uphill battle to maintain this species against such concerns.
     
  4. ZYBen

    ZYBen Well-Known Member

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    theer are still 2 groups of Mongoose at the zoo, i dont knwo what sex each group is, i am assuming one male one female
     
  5. bongorob

    bongorob Well-Known Member

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    Here in England dwarf mongooses are popular, though not as much as meerkats, everyone seems to keep meerkats. The yellow mongoose is also becoming common. Perhaps in Australia, more endangered mongoose species, or other small carnivores will be kept. If they are allowed in, that is.
     
  6. Zoo_Boy

    Zoo_Boy Well-Known Member

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    would be great, but unlikely for further imports of new mongoose varieties.

    on yellow mongoose, these are well displayed with meerkats, as the 2 naturally co-exist in the same burrow system! what a great display that would make.

    i would love to see a greater diversity in australia, but first lets overcome our ungulate problems!
     
  7. fact finder

    fact finder Member

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    Currently 3 pairs are housed at the zoo but unlikely to breed "succesfully"; ZERO chance of import; population doomed im afraid.
     
  8. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The phasing-out of species in Australia, not to mention the strict importation laws, must be frustrating for many zoo fans down under. Long-term it definitely is for the best to have a regional focus on a strong, healthy, resourceful collection of captive animals that will flourish in the years ahead...rather than spreading species too thin and not having a sustainable population.

    However, in a way it is rather tragic that many species are simply being left to die out.
     
  9. fact finder

    fact finder Member

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    not just D-Mongoose on the Australasian "Final Straight"!

    Add - American Beavers; Tree Shrews; Two-Toed Sloths; Syrian Brown Bears; Flamigoes; Pygmy Hippos; Patagonian Cavy;.............

    The region and AD ZOO about to lose some gems forever in the nearish future.
     
  10. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

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    snowleopard - the lack of large, well funded zoos is another reason for the large scale-back in collection sizes here.

    maybe the biggest hurdle to overcome is that there still appears to be some serious issues with cooperation that need to be resolved. the lack of pro-activeness in pre-existing breeding programs (such as pygmy hippos), blatent priority-changing after making regional agreements (such as francois' vs dusky langurs) and constant plotting by different zoos to bring in different species (giant panda, indian rhino) all makes it ever more difficult.

    ARAZPA'S value is undermined unless everyone sticks to ALL their promises made at the association table.
     
  11. PAT

    PAT Well-Known Member

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    If our zoo's are planning on getting brazilian tapirs wouldn't be a smart idea to keep on breeding patagonian cavy's. I've only ever seen them once and that was at melbourne a few years ago. I wish they would keep trying because i just love them and in the long run it could help make multi species habitats with two animals that would definatley keep peoples attention because they look so strange.
     
  12. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

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    i'm confused. i'm guessing your opening statement should have read:

    "if our zoo's are planning on getting brazilian tapirs wouldn't it be a smart idea to keep on breeding patagonian cavy's?"

    hmmmm... well there's a couple of things here worth noting. currently the zoos are yet to re-negotiate protocols for importing rodents into australia. like artiodactyls, nothing has come in for a long time. the patagonian cavies currently in australia are terribly inbred and breeding is down as a result. melbourne has since consolidated its animals at adelaide but i think the consensus is their finished.

    once the doors are opened for rodents the zoos hope to get approval for the importation of a few species. unfortunately for cavy fans, i don't think they are one of them.

    instead, i would guess capybara, african crested porcupines and brazilian agouti would top the list.

    the good news is that capybara are a similar sized rodent that in my opinion, is even more suitable in mixed species exhibits with tapir than cavies. they share the same habitat/region (unlike cavies/tapir) and are likewise semiaquatic. before the cavies came along, dubbo used to display groups of capybara in their sth american mixed species exhibit.

    unfortunately capybara went the way the cavies are now.
     
  13. PAT

    PAT Well-Known Member

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    First of all thats what i meant but was in a hurry to write it and didn't notice. And secondly i just like patagonian cavies better because they don't turn their exhibits into mud holes and i am yet to see a green capybara exhibit even on the internet
     
  14. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I feel sorry for you Aussie folk, as having to battle the ARAZPA just to get rodents into Australiasia must be just as frustrating as the continual phasing-out of particular types of animals. There was mention of the giant pandas arriving at the Adelaide Zoo, and the indian rhino at WPZ (or is that now TWPZ?)....yet aren't those two examples proof that anything is possible?

    Speaking of rodents, last week at the Seattle Zoo I spent a few minutes checking out a pair of tiny acouchis. They are almost identical to agoutis...and I'd be hard pressed to tell the difference.
     
  15. jay

    jay Well-Known Member

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    It's not ARAZPA that is the problem so much as the quarantine service. Australia and New Zealand are blessedly free of so many diseases (eh Foot and Mouth) that the risk is too high to bring in hoofed animals. This is a sensible powsition though Free Traders cry foul.
     
  16. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

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    pat - there is some photos of capybara in a grassy exhibit at western plains zoo in the gallery section of this website. but do i detect a bit of bluntness in your wording?
     
  17. PAT

    PAT Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't being blunt i just don't want to admit that i don't like capybara's, They're just ugly and smelly and muddy.
     
  18. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

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    there's nothing wrong with admitting you don't like something.

    i don't like my ex-girlfriend. and i'm happy to admit that to anyone.
     
  19. PAT

    PAT Well-Known Member

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    Ha! Was she ugly and smelly and muddy like a capybara?
     
  20. CZJimmy

    CZJimmy Well-Known Member

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    Many UK zoos manage to keep capybara exhibits green (I'm sure that there are pictures already in the gallery, I think there's a good example of Edinburgh...).

    Over here it is also pretty much standard to keep brazilian tapirs with capybara at any collection which keeps them both. They seem to get on at most of the collections that I have visited as well.