Join our zoo community

Exotic Birds in Australia

Discussion in 'Australia' started by zooboy28, 21 Apr 2014.

  1. WhistlingKite24

    WhistlingKite24 Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2018
    Posts:
    678
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    A brief update.
    Gorge Wildlife Park still has one elderly Rhea and they confirmed she is the last one of her kind in Australia. As I mentioned earlier in the thread, Darling Downs Zoo no longer has their elderly female (most likely passed away sometime in 2018).
    Time for the really sad news...
    I recently contacted Zoos Victoria and they informed me that their last Razor-billed Currasow (Betty) died in June 2019. :( The end of an era for a species no longer found in Australian zoos.
     
    Jambo, Goura, animal_expert01 and 2 others like this.
  2. Yoshistar888

    Yoshistar888 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2019
    Posts:
    619
    Location:
    Australia
    That means Melbourne Zoo has lost 3 species in June to August period

    Binturong (Gansga) Died July
    Razor Billed Cussarow (Betty) died June
    Brazilian Tapir (Arturo) Given to Adelaide zoo.
     
    Cassidy Casuar likes this.
  3. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2015
    Posts:
    799
    Location:
    QLD Australia
    :(:(:(
     
  4. toothlessjaws

    toothlessjaws Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Apr 2017
    Posts:
    205
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    The curassow was the highlight of Melbourne's otherwise now-pathetic bird collection. :(
     
    Goura likes this.
  5. Goura

    Goura Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    20 Mar 2012
    Posts:
    250
    Location:
    Perth, WA, Australia
    It's a shame because they could make so much more of their facilities, including the great flight aviary. Would be great to see some Australian endemics not often seen like Golden bowerbird, Tooth-billed catbird and even Comb-crested Jacana
     
  6. Yoshistar888

    Yoshistar888 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2019
    Posts:
    619
    Location:
    Australia
    What’s been happening with birds and mammals and is when a species departs they replace it with an already existing species at the zoo such as when Mandrills departed cassowarys took their place and when Gansga the binturong died it is now inhabited by squirrel monkeys which have 3 exhibits now. Or they completely stop the exhibit all together like The bongo exhibit was turned into more administrative buildings.
    Furthermore there has also been a waste of space, the great flight aviary is understocked as is the macaw aviary. Growing wild in particular is a useless segment turning perfect space into another kids playground and only exhibiting animals which the zoo already has on display like corn snakes, Aldabra tortoises, meerkats, shinglebacks.

    Even one of the reptile exhibits displays a repeated species and it’s an extremely common native.

    Why does the zoo have TWO Sumatran tiger exhibits on show, TWO Tasmanian Devil exhibits, TWO Phillipine crocodile exhibits, TWO snow leopard exhibits. Notice how these TWO are all in the new carnivore section.

    My last visit was in October and I was unlucky that Gansga the binturong had died, Betty now has passed away and Auruto was moved to Adelaide very close to my visit. I think I just have bad luck.
     
    CGSwans, Zorro and Goura like this.
  7. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2 Jan 2017
    Posts:
    609
    Location:
    everywhere
    Perhaps the doubling up on a number of species in exhibits is to fill the gaps when zoos are reducing the number of species being held within the collections there appears to be some within the zoo world in our region who want less animal species in our zoos!
     
  8. toothlessjaws

    toothlessjaws Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Apr 2017
    Posts:
    205
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    This list could do with a bit of an update. A lot of the seedeater and softbill species on the list have unfortunately been lost to aviculture and thus Australia.

    The following are all either definitively gone or so rare they are functionally extinct anyways:
    *Silver-eared Mesia Leiothrix argentauris
    *White-rumped Shama Copsychus malabaricus
    *Red-crested Cardinal Paroaria coronata
    *Red-throated Parrot-finch Erythrura psittacea
    *Bamboo Parrot-finch Erythrura hyperythra
    *Pin-tailed Parrot-finch Erythrura prasina
    *Peale's (Fiji) Parrot-finch Erythrura pealii
    *Lavender Waxbill Estrilda caerulescens
    *Green Avadavat Amandava formosa
    *Violet-eared Waxbill (Common Greandier) Uraeginthus granatinus
    *African Firefinch Lagonosticta rubricata
    *Dybowski's Twinspot Euschistospiza dybowskii
    *Peter's Twinspot Hypargos niveoguttatus
    *Green-backed Twinspot Mandingoa nitidula
    *Grey-headed Silverbill Lonchura griseicapilla
    *Lesser Redpoll Carduelis flammea
    *Linnet Carduelis cannabina
    *European Siskin Carduelis spinus
    *Black-headed Siskin Carduelis notata
    *European Serin Serinus serinus
    *Grey Singing Finch (White-rumped Seedeater) Serinus leucopygius
    *House Finch Haemorhous mexicanus
    *Purple Finch Haemorhous purpureus
    *Yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella
    *Comoros (Red-headed) Fody Foudia eminentissima
    *Plain-backed Sparrow Passer flaveolus
     
  9. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    23,189
    Location:
    not travelling
    With regards to species only in private aviculture (i.e. foreign finches etc), I specifically said this in the second post of the thread: "the lists of waxbills, finches and parrots were mostly created from stock-lists (e.g. bird sale sites) and Australian avicultural forums. I don't really know which are still found in Australia (I know some are incredibly rare now, some possibly having died out) or further which species are present which have been missed off those lists."

    So - same as the case with the New Zealand list containing waxbills etc - all those species will stay there because there is no real way of knowing with certainty which are actually gone completely.
     
    Yoshistar888 likes this.
  10. toothlessjaws

    toothlessjaws Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Apr 2017
    Posts:
    205
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Yes I know you said this. And I'm simply trying to provide further information to the forum for the sake of accuracy.
     
  11. tetrapod

    tetrapod Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10 Apr 2008
    Posts:
    1,284
    Location:
    sw england
    Taking all of those species out of the equation makes for depressing reading re: exotic birds in the country... Australian zoos have done non-native bird species poorly for too long.
     
    Zorro likes this.
  12. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    23,189
    Location:
    not travelling
    The zoos have never really done anything for exotic waxbills and parrots though - those groups (and pheasants) have always been the domain of private aviculturists (which is why it is never going to be clear which of the rare species are still present and which are not).

    But yes, for other groups - things like curassows, flamingoes, etc - then the failure of them in Australia is solely the fault of the zoos.
     
    MRJ and animal_expert01 like this.
  13. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2 Jan 2017
    Posts:
    609
    Location:
    everywhere
    Along with a number of mammal species as well