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Indian Mixed Species Backyard Acreage???

Discussion in 'Private Collections & Pets' started by Sarus Crane, 15 Jun 2018.

  1. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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    So I am hoping one day to have have a big field exhibit of Indian hoofstock & large birds as my backyard, kinda like the big Asian field paddock at Disney's Animal Kingdom except that the animals won't be able to become invisible by going over a hill. I am planning on including the following species:

    1.3 Gaur (Bos gaurus)
    1.3 Barasingha (Rucervus duvaucelii)
    1.1 Sarus Crane (Grus antigone)
    1.1 Bar Headed Goose (Anser indicus)
    1.1 Red Crested Pochard (Netta rufina)
    1.1 Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata)
    1.2 Blue Peafowl (Pavo cristatus)

    I plan on having a holding area and barn for the Gaur like the Toronto Zoo's Indian Rhinoceros pavilion, but scaled down a little with a stall for the cows and a smaller one for the bull. The deer might need just a holding yard. I'm planning on living in the South where it doesn't get too hot or too cold. In terms of the Chronic Wasting Disease that says you can't have cervids such as Barasingha, I 'm planning on either becoming an AZA partner or getting a permit to have them and the Gaur. How many acres would you suggest at a minimum? I'm not looking to go all out like San Diego or Lion Country Safari but would like to give the animals an adequate amount of space with large trees and tall grasses to give a sense of being in their native habitat along with a water-type moat. I'm using Kanha National Park in Madhya Pradesh as my inspiration.

    I also hope to have some space for a pumpkin patch and garden to grow crops and create revenue for the property. This way I can save money on groceries and get money in when I invite people to pick out pumpkins for Halloween. Also once I get established (if it ever happens) I may invite school groups out to see the wildlife and create more revenue that way. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated. I just figured if ordinary people can afford to live on a farm, why not focus on exotics like the exotic Texas ranches??? Since exotics are usually hardier than domestic livestock, it seems like a reasonable and cool idea right?
     
  2. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    I suggest you increase the waterfowl, six birds isn't going to be enough of a supporting cast for the hoofstock. You could add small groups of Comb Duck, Ruddy Shelduck, Spotbill and Fulvous Whistling Duck to create more of an Indian wetland atmosphere. Red Junglefowl and Kalij would also be nice.
     
  3. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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    That's a great idea! Hopefully the Gaur nearby would discourage predators like coyotes and raccoons from trying to access the waterfowl.
     
  4. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    No they won't. You need predator proof fencing or all your birds will get killed.
     
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  5. PrimoCulture Farms

    PrimoCulture Farms Active Member

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    Saurus, I'm kind of working on the same idea though up in the north. Maybe trade contact info sometime?
     
  6. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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    8ft welded wire with an electric component? Also, would the Gaur tolerate the Sarus Cranes in their same yard? Or would you have to introduce the Gaur last to the exhibit?
     
  7. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    I've no experience with Gaur. However, cranes with hoofstock is generally a bad idea.
     
  8. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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    Why? Because of the cranes territorial nature?
     
  9. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    No, because they get killed by playful, aggressive or clumsy hoofstock.
     
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  10. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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    True.