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June 11th Lockdown puzzle

Discussion in 'Quizzes, Competitions & Games' started by amur leopard, 11 Jun 2020.

  1. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    June 11th Animal identification + Odd one out challenge. - ZooChat

    Here is the next challenge. I know it is a little early and I am sorry, but I wanted to do it now because Zoochat is not very active right now and I have exams soon. Following @gentle lemur's challenges, he has given me permission to try and do one of my own while essentially copying his ideas. Hopefully, this will be not too hard but not too easy either.

    The challenge is to find the odd one out in the pattern. You then have to suggest a suitable replacement for the odd one out so that it satisfies the pattern in the others. Some of them are quite hard to identify, and I've tried to show a bit more of the animal in these cases. However, this time, you will have to delve deeper into the animal's identity than just Latin or common names this time. There is also an added complication in that the order is very relevant.

    I may give more clues as the challenge goes on, but for now let's see how you get on.

    The answer may not be instantly visible as soon as you correctly ID all of them, but it should give you an inkling of what the pattern is. Also, once you find a pattern, there is likely another further complication and also another further complication after that.

    You can DM me your answers, or just post them on the thread. Teamwork is permitted. Good luck all, and in 1 week you can start sending in answers.
     
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  2. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Most of them are pretty obvious right off the bat, but there's a couple that I don't even know what part of the animal I'm looking at!
     
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  3. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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    Great puzzle @amur leopard ! I've tentatively identified all of them and I think I have the theme, but need to confirm (which I'll do tonight after work).
     
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  4. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I made it a bit easier because the odd one out etc. is pretty layered, so it is easier to identify them on this one. However, some of them are quite hard, especially if you don't know what part of the animal you are looking at :D
     
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  5. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you ought to wait until a week has passed, as @amur leopard suggested in the first post :)
     
  6. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    Would you mind deleting the post and then copying and pasting it into a PM with me?
    Good attempt though...
     
    Last edited: 11 Jun 2020
  7. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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    You might want to edit your post too @amur leopard as it will show in the quote (like I did in the post before yours).
     
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  8. German Zoo World

    German Zoo World Well-Known Member

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    Yes i can do that
     
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  9. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    I can recognise many of the species, but I can't see any real connections yet, so I can't try to work out the pattern - but I'll keep thinking and I'll need to check updated names as well.
     
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  10. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    I have an answer. I have tested it with @amur leopard and it is not the answer that he wants. That doesn't mean it is wrong - but it doesn't make it right either.
    It took me a while to identify all the animals and eventually I had to get cunning to solve the hardest one, but I am fairly certain I am right - or at least close enough for my solution to work.
    I have followed the principle of Occam's Razor, so at least my answer has the benefit of simplicity and does not need extra layers. Of course I won't post it here until the time limit has passed, and I will keep working at alternative solutions as I am building up a table with information about each species.
     
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  11. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    You may now submit solutions, either by PM or on this thread! :)
     
  12. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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    1 Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) - Africa
    2 Jamaican tody (Todus todus) - North America
    3 Pied imperial pigeon (Ducula bicolor) - Asia
    4 Blue-billed curassow (Crax alberti) - South America
    5 Lumholtz's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus lumholtzi) - Australasia
    6 Sun-tailed guenon (Allochrocebus solatus) - Africa
    7 Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) - North America
    8 Candy-stripe loach (Botia striata) - Asia
    9 Red-bellied piranha (Pygocentrus nattereri) - South America
    10 Blue-eyed cockatoo (Cacatua ophthalmica) - Australasia
    11 Abyssinian thrush (Turdus abyssinicus) - Africa
    12 American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) - North America
    13 Japanese serow (Capricornis crispus) - Asia
    14 Blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) - South America
    15 Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) - Australasia
    16 Peringuey's viper (Bitis peringueyi) - Africa
    17 Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) - North America
    18 Common butterfly lizard (Leiolepis belliana) - Asia
    19 Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum) - South America
    20 Tongan megapode (Megapodius pritchardii) - Australasia

    I must have misidentified a few, and I have no clue what links them or which is the odd one out!
     
  13. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    Although you do have one of the patterns which is that the animals are arranged by continent in columns ;)
    6 of them are off the mark though.

    EDIT: I realise I have made one of the IDs slightly misleading, and I apologise. Number 14 has to be to at a subspecific level for this to work. I know that makes it a bit easier, but I was looking for a clue and I guess that slight slip-up has done the work for me :D
     
  14. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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    That would make 14 the Galapagos subspecies then I guess
     
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  15. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    I agree with most @Mo Hassan's answers for the species. But I differ with the following:-

    3 Silvery pigeon, Columba argentina
    7 Saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus (but I'm far from certain about this one)
    9 Black pacu, Colossoma macroponum
    11 Taita thrush, Turdus helleri
    16 Sahara sand viper, Cerastes vipera

    If I am correct about the pacu, you could argue that it is the Odd One Out because it is the only one which has been widely introduced outside its native range for aquaculture and so it is the only species which is Not Evaluated on the IUCN Red List.
    I would also add that the sun-tailed guenon is the only one that has been described in my lifetime (it is not mentioned in the old primate books that I bought as a student, although many ZooChatters would not be able to say this, so it can't be the proper answer).
    My favourite answer is to say that the pronghorn is the One. Because its name comes from Middle German and Middle English - without any links to Greek, Latin, Romance languages or native names. I would replace it with the angwantibo, because its such a nice animal and such a nice name to say :) This answer works even if I have identified the croc and the viper incorrectly.
    Obviously none of these answers are what @amur leopard has in mind. So I think his mind must be even more devious than mine. I take my hat off to him :)
     
    Last edited: 18 Jun 2020
  16. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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    Ah yes, that did occur to me.

    You could be right on those IDs - I decided against a Cerastes viper as 16 doesn't look like it has horns, and I've never seen a black pacu with a red belly like that so didn't think of that.
     
  17. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    You are absolutely correct on two of your corrections and blisteringly close on a third, so much so that the English name could be used to describe the correct species. @Mo Hassan is closer on the other two to the extent that he has the right genus (although you also have the correct genus on one of those).

    Sorry for such a convoluted post :p

    Your solutions are very cunning, but not what I was thinking of. Of course, they are still solutions, as long as they work when the correct IDs are found. ;)
     
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  18. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    Extra clue - for number 16, do not use Wikipedia because the photo on there is of a very dissimilar individual to that I have given a photo of.
     
  19. Mo Hassan

    Mo Hassan Well-Known Member

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  20. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    OK, how about I tell you which ones you don't have yet, and then a little clue? You have one of the patterns already, but you need the second for the real breakthrough.

    1 Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) - Africa (Incorrect but close)
    2 Jamaican tody (Todus todus) - North America (Correct)
    3 Silvery imperial pigeon (Correct)
    4 Blue-billed curassow (Crax alberti) - South America (Correct)
    5 Lumholtz's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus lumholtzi) - Australasia (Correct)
    6 Sun-tailed guenon (Allochrocebus solatus) - Africa (Correct)
    7 Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) - North America (Incorrect but close)
    8 Candy-stripe loach (Botia striata) - Asia (Correct)
    9 Black pacu (Incorrect but close)
    10 Blue-eyed cockatoo (Cacatua ophthalmica) - Australasia (Correct)
    11 Taita thrush (Correct)
    12 American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) - North America (Correct)
    13 Japanese serow (Capricornis crispus) - Asia (Correct)
    14 Galapagos Blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) - South America (Correct)
    15 Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) - Australasia (Correct)
    16 Peringuey's viper (Bitis peringueyi) - Africa (Incorrect but quite close)
    17 Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) - North America (Correct)
    18 Common butterfly lizard (Leiolepis belliana) - Asia (Incorrect but close)
    19 Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum) - South America (Correct)
    20 Tongan megapode (Megapodius pritchardii) - Australasia (Correct)

    So, using the above list as your list between the two of you, 1, 7, 9, 16 and 18 still off, with all of them close. I assume you can guess 1 given that it is incorrect, and probably have a good stab at the others.

    The clue is to look into, for example, number 11 further. :). Numbers 20 or 8 wouldn't be bad ideas either. Once you see similarities between these, look at the others, revise your incorrect IDs, and you should be able to find the odd one out from there. The final pattern is needed to accurately find a replacement for the odd one out, but you could probably get it by fluke. The second pattern is needed to find the third.

    Good luck!