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Native Bird Species in Zoos

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by animalszoos, 16 Jun 2016.

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Should native bird species be kept in zoos?

  1. Yes - Native bird species should be kept in zoos

    19 vote(s)
    79.2%
  2. No - Native bird species should be kept in zoos

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. It depends where

    5 vote(s)
    20.8%
  1. animalszoos

    animalszoos Well-Known Member

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    After looking through Zootierliste, I observed that few zoos keep native european bird species such as european tits, robins etc.
    What do you think about native bird species in zoos?
     
  2. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    I firstly taught on European vultures reading this thread, then on Californian condors.

    I think they should be kept, why not? After all, many people will not see them altough they are native. Like for example, I had never seen Eurasian Griffon vultures in the wilderness here, although they live in the nature at about 20 to 50 km from me (Southern R. Macedonia, bordering regions with Greece). But I had seen Egyptian vultures (Western subspecies) flying in the sky nearby!, some years ago.

    But if I organise trip, I can see both species in the wilderness.


    Although me personaly, would not love to keep native birds from my country or the Europe in general, in my eventual future zoo, aside from vultures, maybe because birds who only live in tropics (rainforests, savanah) are more exotic and colourfull/attractive?! and with more exotic and bigger shapes (eg. great blue turaco, birds of paradise, big parrots).
     
    Last edited: 16 Jun 2016
  3. animalszoos

    animalszoos Well-Known Member

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    Maybe for rarer species, but for more common species like blackbirds and the blue tit are rarely ever seen in zoos in their homeland.
     
  4. jbnbsn99

    jbnbsn99 Well-Known Member

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    Common species take the space of species that need conservation help. Zoos need to make sure they are allocating their resources to where they will do the most good.
     
  5. Macaw16

    Macaw16 Well-Known Member

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    Yes they should, but they should also carry educational messages or conservation needs.

    To take a British example; imagine no Barn Owls, Common Ravens, Common Kestrels, various waterfowl, European Cranes, et al.
     
  6. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Think this is somekind of strange poll in which we can choose from :
    Yes they should be kept and
    No they should be kept ????
     
  7. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, :p it should be: No they shouldn't be kept

    How English sounds to non-native speakers .. :)
     
  8. siamang27

    siamang27 Well-Known Member

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    Sure.
    Though if it's a bird species that is very common wild in the zoo or surrounding area it would be a bit pointless. Maybe use less common species that people are less likely to see.
    One great example of where this works for me is the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum. All native Arizona birds in a large walk-through aviary. Some extremely common (even within the park) but some less so, so it's great for showing what you may see in the desert.
     
  9. Mr. Zootycoon

    Mr. Zootycoon Well-Known Member

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    I don't see why a zoo would need to keep common blackbirds, robins, wagtails etc.
    They are relatively difficult to keep, and they are often found in the wild on
    zoo grounds, so it would be a waste of space and time.

    However, I certainly like the display of less common, endagered native birds,
    or species that are harder to see in the wild for most people. Also particulairly
    colourful species like the European goldfinch, might be attractive to visitors.

    Several zoos (Bioparco Roma for example) try to educate people about the
    wild bird species on the zoo grounds. In some cases, it makes people notice
    certain wild birds they wouldn't have seen otherwise.
     
  10. animalszoos

    animalszoos Well-Known Member

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    Correct. Sorry...
     
  11. Zoovolunteer

    Zoovolunteer Well-Known Member

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    One thought about native species exhibits - there are many species whose habitat or lifestyle makes it difficult for the typical city-based member of the public to see in everyday life. For example the various grouse species, conifer forest specialists such as Nutcracker and Crossbill, or mountain species such as Alpine Chough or Ring Ouzel will not often be come across unless a special trip is made, even if people are aware they are native to their country, and could make good exhibits and a chance for talking about native species conservation.
     
  12. wensleydale

    wensleydale Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it occurs to a lot of people that many people (especially the economically disadvantaged) either can't or won't be able to go see a lot of native species in their natural habitat. Also, a lot of native animals are elusive (not just birds) so you need some skill that most of us don't have to seek them out, or they are endangered, or only out a night, etc. So yes they should be kept in zoos.
     
  13. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    I say keep the more uncommon ones on display and put up bird feeders to attract native birds.
     
  14. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    Most zoos keep some native birds.

    Feeders for wild birds in a zoo might be a good idea. If they are mealworm and seed feeders, are protected to exclude pest commensal birds like crows, mallards and pigeons, and are set between old trees and some space where visitors stay anyway (eg. a restaurant) - this might work.

    Native bird aviaries are common. The best ones, like migration aviary at Rotterdam, are walk-through, and have beautiful sublimated version of natural habitat. For birds, one can make beautiful landscape with native rocks, logs, native flowers, traditional farm equipment etc. I saw several beautiful aviaries done this way.
     
  15. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    Definitely native birds should be displayed, as many people will see only a fraction of locally-occurring species. Where international tourists are a significant component of visitors, this may be important for attracting them. In Australasia especially, native species make up a very large proportion of bird species on display.

    Zoos often naturally attract native birds, especially in areas with relatively little vegetation (e.g. cities).

    In addition, many zoos have established gardens that are "bird-friendly" and demonstrate what people can do to attract birds to their gardens, e.g. plantings, feeders, etc. These are often in children's zoos or native animal areas.

    Some zoos use specific feeders or other features to attract specific bird species. For example, San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a hummingbird garden, while Melbourne Zoo has nectar feeders to attract wild Rainbow Lorikeets.