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New Zoo Books

Discussion in 'TV, Movies, Books about Zoos & Wildlife' started by snowleopard, 7 Nov 2016.

  1. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    While there are perhaps not many books that can come close to the quality of the San Diego Zoo Centenary double volume, and while Anthony Sheridan's latest is definitely worth buying (although as usual his statistics and charts exhibit many flaws)...here are 7 others that have scarcely been mentioned on ZooChat.

    Book #1: Elephants and Egotists: In Search of Samorn of the Adelaide Zoo

    Elephants and Egotists : Patricia Sumerling : 9781743053997

    I already posted a very short review under a different thread and I'd recommend this book.

    Book #2: Through the Lion Gate: A History of the Berlin Zoo

    https://www.amazon.ca/Through-Lion-...TF8&qid=1478544752&sr=1-3&keywords=berlin+zoo

    This book will be published next August and while it is a long wait I'm sure that many zoo enthusiasts will be ready to read about Berlin Zoo...although 300 pages seems as if it would scarcely do the zoo justice! We'll have to wait and see what the book looks like but at least there is now a cover photo of a caged tiger on the link above.

    Book #3: The Zoo: The Wild and Wonderful Tale of the Founding of London Zoo

    The Zoo : Isobel Charman : 9780241240687

    I've already ordered this one and it was only just published a few days ago. I'm looking forward to yet another book on London Zoo.

    Book #4: My Life in the Cleveland Zoo: A Memoir

    https://www.amazon.ca/My-Life-Cleve...&qid=1478545024&sr=1-1&keywords=cleveland+zoo

    At more than 400 pages (with zero photos) it is a rather entertaining read and tells the perspective from a man who was first a tour train driver, then a night watchman, and finally a keeper. The book is well worth purchasing and neatly divided into three sections to represent the three different jobs that the writer held at the Cleveland Zoo over many years.

    Book #5: The Animal Game: Searching for Wildness at the American Zoo

    https://www.amazon.com/Animal-Game-...8&qid=1478545232&sr=1-31&keywords=zoo+history

    This book was just published this week.

    Book #6: American Zoo: A Sociological Safari

    https://www.amazon.ca/American-Zoo-...8&qid=1478546870&sr=1-11&keywords=zoo+history

    This book was reviewed in Zoo Grapevine magazine and I found it an intriguing read as the writer volunteered at two different Philadelphia-area zoos and provides several different perspectives on zoological institutions. From disgruntled employees to happy volunteers, from behind-the-scenes happenings at Elmwood Park Zoo to looking at zoos with a larger lens...a mixed-bag but an interesting collection of ideas for the reader to consider.

    Book #7: The Zoo and Screen Media: Images of Exhibition and Encounter

    https://www.amazon.ca/Zoo-Screen-Me...8&qid=1478547106&sr=1-20&keywords=zoo+history

    The ONLY book on this list that I won't purchase...it is out of my price range for something that is only 290 pages. :)
     
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  2. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Definitely hoping that pagecount is just a placeholder; 307 pages is nowhere near sufficient in my opinion for a full account of the history of Zoo Berlin. The following somewhat-inaccurate information within the blurb is not encouraging, either:

     
  3. sooty mangabey

    sooty mangabey Well-Known Member

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    It's actually not as inaccurate a statement as it might at first appear to be! While each of the two zoos obviously exists as a discrete entity, the management of the two was combined following the fall of the Berlin Wall. That said, although I don't know how things are under the current leadership, it always surprised me that there wasn't more crossover between the two zoos - staff appeared to work at one or the other, and there was little sense of connectivity between the two, despite their shared director.
     
  4. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    My point is, the two collections did not share a director until 2007; although ostensibly managed as an overall entity beforehand, the lack of crossover you note was even more pronounced until that point. As such I wouldn't call the two collections "unified" from 1990 onwards, but rather 2007 onwards.
     
  5. sooty mangabey

    sooty mangabey Well-Known Member

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    Fair point - I'd forgotten the length of time for which Bernard B was in charge only of the Tierpark.

    My understanding is that when he took over this job he was resented, a little, by some in the east who saw him as the zoo's man.
     
  6. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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  7. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  8. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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  9. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The 2014 book Reptiland: How a Boyhood Dream became a Modern Zoo is an enjoyable, brisk read about a specialized zoological collection. The book is small in size and only 130 pages in length (not 148 as it says on Amazon) although at least 25 of those pages are taken up with black-and-white photos. Clyde Peeling gives a first-hand account of what he deemed a "roadside zoo" and for at least a couple of decades it seems as if Reptiland barely survived. However, Peeling is particularly proud of the 1986 AZA accreditation and the facility has maintained its accreditation ever since. Now more than 50 years old and with an expensive new Komodo Dragon exhibit added in 2013 (along with an expanded entrance) Reptiland appears to have weathered its financial storms and will likely be around for at least another 50 years. I appreciate reading about the more obscure zoos of the world and I'd recommend this book for any zoo enthusiast's library.

    Here is the Amazon link:

    https://www.amazon.ca/Reptiland-Boy...UTF8&qid=1488060086&sr=8-1&keywords=reptiland
     
  10. Bib Fortuna

    Bib Fortuna Well-Known Member

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    There is a new, interesting german Zoobook, about the competition between the two Berlin zoos, the contest between the zoo in the west and the animal park in the east.The Zoological Cold War between Dathe and Klös. I haven't seen it yet, so I have no idea, if its worth to buy:

    https://www.amazon.de/dp/3446255044/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488103281&sr=8-1&keywords=Der+andere+Zoo

    Translatetd to english, the title of the book is:The Zoo of the Others: When the Stasi discovered her heart for spectacle bears & Helmut Schmidt retrofitted with pandas


    When the Cold War is at its peak, the controversy in divided Berlin also takes on bizarre forms: West-Berlin's governing mayor Willy Brandt worries the zoo director Heinz-Georg Klös new elephants, so that his rival, the East Berlin animal park director Heinrich Dathe , Can continue to provide the forehead. For whoever has more elephants has won a battle. Whether a spectacle bear donation by the Stasi, headlines like "Westesel against Ostschwein" ( West donkey against East pig)or the strike exchange of the two characterful directors Heinrich Dathe and Heinz-Georg Klös - the two Berlin zoos betray a lot about divided Germany. With great sympathy for animals and humans, Jan Mohnhaupt tells his story for the first time in his book.
     
  11. Paradoxurus

    Paradoxurus Well-Known Member

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    This sounds a brilliant book. I know its unlikely, but I really hope an English version is published.
     
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