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non native wasps to fight invasive plant on texas border

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by Arizona Docent, 13 Jul 2015.

  1. Arizona Docent

    Arizona Docent Moderator Staff Member

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  2. lintworm

    lintworm Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    This kind of biocontrol is actually quite common when combating the spread of invasive species and the good thing is that biocontrol may stop the spread, but it will never make the species disappear, which is in this case what they want according to the news article.
     
  3. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

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    I think they want it all gone, but not quickly, to give the ocelots and jaguarundis time to move on. If they leave it, even a bit, it will grow back again.

    I always have concerns about biocontrol - if the Carrazzo disappears completely, will the wasps also vanish - or will they adapt and start on some native reeds?

    The entomologist sounds like he's done his homework though, so hopefully it's a success.

    :p

    Hix
     
  4. lintworm

    lintworm Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    Nowadays to get such biocontrol agents released a lot of experiments have to be done whether it will feed on related native species and / or important crops as well, only when that is not the case, they may be introduced....

    But the option cannot be excluded totally that it will not adapt once released and the initial food source is low in abundance. Examples that something like that happened are however very rare since proper testing in advance was introduced... (that was clearly after the Partula disaster...)

    But with only biocontrol as control measure to combat Carrazzo will never disappear completely, there is not a single biocontrol case that has completely let the target species disappear, although there are examples in which cover was brought back to an acceptable level, other control measures should also be implemented to really get rid of Carrazzo (which is probably impossible...)
     
  5. jbnbsn99

    jbnbsn99 Well-Known Member

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    Just send in a bunch of bassoonists and oboists. They'll harvest the cane and turn it into reeds.
     
  6. dean

    dean Well-Known Member

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    We have this in our garden here in the UK, it is tough but looks good in mid spring when the new shoots are about 5 feet high and fully leaved, they reach about 15 feet here.
    It isn't so lush at present as we are in one of the driest parts of the UK - less rain fall on average than Jerusalem- so it looks straggly and unkempt. I wouldn't like to take over though, as they say it is hell to try and dig out.
    I'd have thought heat seeking drones flying over the reeds should aid the police and other state agents to see what is in there. Good luck with the wasps, they will have their work cut out looking at the photo in the article.
     
  7. wally war eagle

    wally war eagle Well-Known Member

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    I hope the exotic wasps do not develop an alliance with mexican fire ants and brazil hybrid killer bees. That would be an unbelievable invasion into the usa.