Join our zoo community

What famous people have you met?

Discussion in 'Zoo Cafe' started by Jake, 26 Jun 2019.

  1. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    8 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    4,348
    Location:
    South Devon
    As a boy, I shook hands with Ernest Marples who was Minister of Transport in the Tory Government of the time (~60 years ago), and he was our local MP. He was mildly famous at that time, but he would have been much, much more famous if Lord Denning had included a section about his sexual indiscretions (both prolific and unusual) in his official report into the Profumo Affair (a sexual scandal involving the Minister of War having sex with a woman who was also sleeping with a Russian diplomat). Instead Lord Denning briefed the Prime Minister, Harold MacMillan, in secret and nothing was ever revealed. I amazed to learn about it earlier this year :)
     
    Last edited: 9 Mar 2020
    amur leopard likes this.
  2. Buldeo

    Buldeo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    8 Aug 2012
    Posts:
    484
    Location:
    The Yay Area
    I once had dinner with Francis Ford Coppola.

    Seven-of-Nine was a regular in a restaurant I worked in, as was Harry Anderson (of Night Court fame). I could name several others, but it feels like bragging.
     
  3. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2009
    Posts:
    1,598
    Location:
    North Dakota, USA
    I met Nancy Cartwright (voice of Bart Simpson) in college. She was very friendly and down to earth but couldn't sign autographs.
     
    Zoofan15 likes this.
  4. Ty Kuykendall

    Ty Kuykendall Member

    Joined:
    8 May 2019
    Posts:
    16
    Location:
    U.S.
    As close as I've ever yet gotten to meeting a famous person, I've worked around Martin Short's younger son when I was a full-time animal care volunteer at Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary (about 8 months since I started there).

    He was pursuing a wildlife veterinarian career; and was kind and shy. He lived off the premises, so I didn't see much of him. I didn't know anything about his relations for some time until my other fellow volunteers were talking about it.
     
  5. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    8 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    4,348
    Location:
    South Devon
    My optometrist recently prescribed sunglasses for me and advised me to wear them on sunny days. As spring has finally arrived in the UK, I have had to wear them a little. Catching the first glimpse of myself in a mirror was a shock (not at all a pretty sight) but it gave me a flashback which belongs in a special sub-category for this thread: The Most Famous Person You Have Nearly Knocked Over in the Street and Then Recognised Them Although They Were Wearing Sunglasses (even if you didn't exactly meet them).
    It happened in the spring of 1973, outside the front door of 'The Kings Arms' in Oxford. It's on a crossroads which is always busy with pedestrians including townsfolk, tourists, students and dons, and it is quite often glimpsed on TV in the background behind Inspector Morse or his sidekicks and spin-offs. I was walking briskly southwards when I had swerve to my right to avoid colliding with a man walking slowly towards me. He was a little taller than I am, with a very straight back and a slightly bemused expression on his face. He had short iron grey hair, a navy blue raincoat and the legs of his trousers were cut quite tightly and ended above his ankle bones. As mentioned before, he was wearing dark glasses: but his face was instantly recognisable. It looked much older than his body. It was slightly jowly and very heavily lined: perhaps the sort of face that a Roman emperor might have had at the end of long reign with many battles, many difficult decisions and a good few orgies too. It was W H Auden, some of whose poems I had studied a few years earlier for my Eng Lit O-level exam.
    Auden had lived in the USA for more than 30 years, hence the cut of his trousers. But he had just returned to Oxford following the death of his partner. I wonder if he was thinking about his student days as he walked up the road. Sadly he died suddenly that summer while he was on holiday in Austria. Auden was probably the greatest English-born poet of the 20th Century, so perhaps if this thread is read by an Internet archaeologist in 100 years time, his name may be the only one that they recognise.
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2020