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Which EDGE species will you vote for : The bleeding heart dove or the kagu? (Poll)

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by Onychorhynchus coronatus, 10 Apr 2021.

?

which species will you vote for ?

Poll closed 20 Apr 2021.
  1. Kagu

    83.3%
  2. Bleeding heart dove

    16.7%
  1. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Second poll on EDGE bird species: This time a bit of an avian horror show with ghost vs gore: The "gory" bleeding heart dove and the "phantasmagorical" kagu.

    Both of these visually striking species are insular endemics native to forest habitat of the islands of the Asia and Pacific region and the decline of both species has been caused by overhunting, the pet trade, invasive species and habitat loss.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Which of these bird species interests you most / will you vote for ?

    Please also feel free to write comments regarding why you made the choice and why the species you have voted for interests you more.

    Thanks !

    Look forward to seeing the results!




    Photo credits to @Rayane and @gentle lemur.
     
    UngulateNerd92 likes this.
  2. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    *To be clear I know "bleeding heart dove" is a bit vague considering that there are seven species of the bleeding heart doves.

    However, I am specifically referring to the Negros and Mindoro species which are listed as EDGE species.

    I couldn't find these pictured in the gallery so they are represented in the picture above by the Luzon bleeding heart dove.
     
  3. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    I have found some of the choices difficult, but this one is easy

    The kagu is the only member of a family of birds. As Ornithorhynchus coronatus says, there are several species of bleeding heart doves and the Columbidae has many species.
     
  4. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your comment and voting @Dassie rat ! Much appreciated ! :)

    I totally agree regarding the uniqueness of the species with it being monotypic and evolutionarily distinct.

    But I have to ask out of curiosity would you say that from an aesthetic point of view that you also prefer the kagu more than the bleeding heart dove species ?
     
  5. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I agree with "Dassie rat" here.

    My vote is for the kagu as it belongs to a monotypic family whilst there are numerous different species of pigeon.

    (And the kagu has always been one my favourite birds; I was very excited the first time I saw the species, many years ago, in Berlin Zoo.)
     
  6. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your comment and vote @Tim May ! Much appreciated!

    As with @Dassie rat I have to ask out of curiosity what do you find appealing about the kagu?

    I mean it is certainly a charismatic bird but why do you personally find it to be ?
     
  7. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    Yes, OC. The kagu is one of the birds I've liked since childhood. I liked seeing it when I visited the Berlin Zoo. I also saw the weka nearby.

    I have a soft spot for members of the former Order Gruiformes.
     
  8. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    That is really interesting that this was a species that was significant to you from childhood.

    Do you remember where you first discovered about this species as a child and why you liked it at that age ?

    Sorry for all of the questions by the way, but don't mean to make this an interrogation its just that I find it intriguing to sort of examine what draws people to particular species and why they become significant or interesting to them.
     
  9. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    I can't remember when I first became interested in the kagu. It may just have been because it was odd, rare and relatively little known.
     
  10. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    It is a unique bird, the only member of its family; this coupled with the fact that, when I was younger, kagus were very seldom seen in zoos made me determined to see one.

    I was excited when, on my first visit to Frankfurt Zoo, I saw a label for the species. Frustratingly, though, despite numerous return visits to the aviary I never managed to see the kagu that day. Although I've now seen kagus in several zoos, I'll never forget seeing the species for the first time in Berlin Zoo
     
  11. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing @Dassie rat !

    Its interesting, perhaps you may have seen an illustration or photograph of one in a book at a young age?

    Did you travel specifically to Berlin to see this species or was it just one of the highlights of the zoo ?
     
  12. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for you reply !

    Yes, most definitely agree, it is really such a curious species and interesting in so many different ways.

    It seems that they aren't quite so rare in captivity anymore and there are quite a few breeding pairs kept by zoos around the world.

    What was that first moment of seeing the species like in Berlin ? could you describe that moment of first seeing this bird at the zoo ?
     
  13. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    While there are more species in the genus Gallicolunba, there are only five species of Bleeding-heart Pigeon, one of which hasn’t been seen for decades. The Luzon and Mindanao species have good international captive populations, in both public and private collections. The Negros Bleeding-heart has been the subject of conservation breeding on its native island in recent years, and reintroduction are not far off. If I could work out how to upload photographs on to here, there would be one or two pics of Negros Bleeding-hearts in the Gallery.
     
  14. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for sharing @FBBird !

    I was actually going to ask this question regarding ex-situ of the Negros and Mindoro bleeding heart so your answer sort of anticipated this :)

    I think one of these programmes is with the Talarak foundation, right ?
     
  15. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    The Talarak Foundation is indeed working with this and other Philippine endemic species.
    Incidentally, I’ve not voted in any of these polls because it’s not the sort of decision I’m prepared to make, even in fun:)
     
  16. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine, also a zoochatter recently interviewed a guy who works with them, Matt I believe his name was but on the subject of the bearded pig and spotted deer.

    Thats ok , lol , but why ?

    I mean do you find both species equally interesting / charismatic?
     
  17. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    I think all animals are interesting and worthy of attention and interest. There’s a lifetime’s study in every species. I can’t choose between the three Bleeding-heart species I’ve worked with, never mind compare them with a weirdly beautiful monotypic island endemic:)
     
  18. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Definitely agree, I think every species is its own enigma and evolutionary miracle ( I don't use that word in the religious / mystical sense but more for what of a term word to describe the sense of scientific awe).

    What species of bleeding heart doves have you worked with and could you mention some observations on these in captivity and just in general in terms of what makes them interesting ?
     
  19. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I had wanted to see a kagu for many years and, as mentioned previously, I was very disappointed and frustrated at not seeing the species in Frankfurt Zoo. Consequently, when I eventually saw a kagu in Berlin, I just felt happy at finally seeing one for the first time.

    I am going back more than thirty-five years but, prior to seeing the Berlin individual, I'd only ever seen black & white photos of the species and I was immediately struck by its colouration: I'd expected them to be much paler.

    I've now seen kagu many more times in Berlin and in various other zoos too but it still remains one of my very favourite bird species, probably second to the shoebill.
     
  20. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I can imagine, there is always a sense of anticipation prior to seeing and satisfaction after ticking off a species from a "species list".

    That is interesting what you mention about the colouration and it not matching what you had expected.

    On the subject of the colouration I should mention (I imagine you probably already know this) that apparently the grey / pale colour of this bird makes it very prominent in the folklore of the indigenous people of New Caledonia who called it and percieved it to be a "ghost" of the forest.