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Zoo Animals Well-Represented & More-Numerous in America, but not in/than in, Europe

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Nikola Chavkosk, 31 Dec 2016.

  1. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Hi Zoochatters,

    I have been inspired for this thread from one thread for animals well represented in America but not in Europe, also plans for this thread can be traced back to my thread number of animals in captivity in Europe.

    So, what other animals can you add on the list, beside these zoo animals (zoo animals that are well- represented in zoos in America or North America, but not in Europe, also zoo animals that are (quite) more numerous in America than in Europe):

    Zoo animals well-estabilshed in America but not in Europe:
    -Baird's tapir
    -South-central Black rhinoceros
    -Massai giraffe
    -Pronghorn antelope
    -Bornean sun bear
    -Californian condor

    Zoo animals (quite) more numerous in America than in Europe:
    -Okapi (America appx. 100; Europe appx. 67)
    -Eastern bongo
    -Malayan tiger
    -Jaguar
    -Chimpanzee (?) (America appx. 1,700; Europe 1,100)
    -Golden lion tamarin (America appx. 270; Europe 160)
    -Koala
    -Komodo dragon
    -Galapagos giant tortoises


    By the way Happy New Year!
     
  2. zoo_enthusiast

    zoo_enthusiast Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't call sun bear well established in America. Last I heard they are on the phase out list.

    I think other species that can be seen in several American collections but very rare or non-existent in Europe are gharials, Coquerel's sifakas, gerenuks, chacoan peccaries, king cobras, and others. Many native North American species are also rare in Europe but can be seen in America (opossums, nine-banded armadillos, fishers, spotted skunks, North American black bears, North American badgers, coyotes, bobcats, white-tailed and mule deer, and others)
     
  3. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Both of these taxa *are* present within Europe in limited numbers.

    The only one of these which is non-existent in Europe is the Coquerel's Sifaka; however, the Crowned Sifaka - absent from the USA - is present.
     
  4. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    Allen's swamp monkey is now very uncommon in Europe, but I believe the species is doing quite well in American zoos.
     
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  5. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    @zoo_enthusiast: King cobra is quite represented in Europe, with 21 holding institutions after ZTL.

    @TeaLovingDave: They *are present*, but *not well-represented* ;)

    Thank you all for additions
     
  6. Loxodonta Cobra

    Loxodonta Cobra Well-Known Member

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    Sun Bears are being phased out completely from the AZA.
     
  7. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't call SC black rhino "well-established" although they are certainly more so than in Europe where only Frankfurt holds them. They are managed by the International Rhino Foundation, while the AZA manages eastern black rhino, the same subspecies as Europe.

    As for sun bears, Nikola is actually right: Bornean sun bears are not held in Europe, only in the US. Mainland sun bears are held on both continents. There are about 35-40 sun bears on both continents, albeit split between the two subspecies in North America.

    This is true, but it's a bit more complicated. The TAG has stopped giving breeding and transfer recommendations and is advising against imports, but zoos aren't being advised to stop trying to breed them if they wish. The problem they've been having with the population is reproduction, so they're encouraging any further research on the issue and any offspring that come of it will have a home found for them. It's therefore possible that there is some breakthrough and American zoos decide to revive the program, but it's highly unlikely... especially with the population split between two subspecies and most animals being post-reproductive.
     
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  8. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    A species completly lacking in European collections but kept ( and bred ) at several North American collections is the Whooper crane.
     
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  9. zoo_enthusiast

    zoo_enthusiast Well-Known Member

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    Black-footed ferret is another example
     
  10. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    America has more gazelle species, like Soemmering's, red-fronted and slender-horned.

    Also some less common South American birds are found occasionally in American zoos but absent in Europe. USA has more variety of eagles, quetzals, less common toucans, cotingas and tanagers, more cocks-of-the-rock etc. Here Dallas Aquarium rules.
     
  11. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    It just I am very surprised what you say about eagle variety in American zoos, I think Europe should have more? Can you list some or one species of eagle that is present in American zoos, but not in European?
     
  12. devilfish

    devilfish Well-Known Member

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    Black-footed cats and little penguins are examples of species which seem to do reasonably well in the USA, but not in Europe. There are many amphibian examples of species which are numerous and multiplying in the USA but are (almost) absent from Europe; Panamanian golden frog and coquis come to mind, with other species like the Kihansi spray toad to a lesser extent.
     
  13. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

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    @devilfish: I had forgotten about the little blue penguins! Definitely true, a unique species between North America and Oceania, I believe.

    Other species include: straw-colored fruit bat, vampire bat, all puffin species, motmots, greater mouse-deer, and Chacoan peccaries.
     
  14. jayjds2

    jayjds2 Well-Known Member

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    Ornate hawk-eagle, black (or tyrant) hawk-eagle, Guianan crested eagle, black and white hawk-eagle.
     
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  15. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes, now I remmember your photo of Guianan crested eagle, jayjds2.
    However, Europe still may equals to/or be greater than, in respect to zoo eagle diversity compared to USA, if Europe holds some Old-World eagles, that are not present in USA, but don't know that. Well-informed about the status of zoo eagles in USA can easily check this looking after Zootierliste list.
     
  16. DDcorvus

    DDcorvus Well-Known Member

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    Chacoan peccaries are a recent arrival in Europe and have a growing population. 2.5 was impoted in 2012 and they can already be seen in 5 European zoos. A number that will expand in the near future.
     
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  17. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    (Depending on what your definition of Oceania is) they are also found in Japan.
     
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  18. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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  19. Mr. Zootycoon

    Mr. Zootycoon Well-Known Member

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    USA might have more individuals of the cock-of-the-rock species, but both species are found in Europe too, and with recent breeding succes, the populations are growing. I suspect Europe to have more species of Old-World passerines, and USA/Canada to have more New-World passerines. Anyone able to confirm?

    How about Malagasy birds? I know Walsrode has a one of a kind collection (at least in Europe) of Malagasy birds (three coua species, malagasy pond heron, cuckoo-roller, blue pigeons, several ducks, ibisses and small passerines), is there a similar collection in America?
     
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  20. zoo_enthusiast

    zoo_enthusiast Well-Known Member

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    I don't think we have anything comparable to Walsrode in the US. The Malagasy bird species that can be seen in some zoos are crested couas, wood crested ibis, vasa parrots, lovebirds, and fodies. I don't believe I ever saw anything else