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Zoo animals you want to see but haven't yet

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Meaghan Edwards, 5 Nov 2008.

  1. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

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    I think LA did once hold Zebra Duiker.

    I believe DAK has held Blackbuck, Banteng, and Brow-Antlered Deer quite recently but I'm not sure whether or not they still do. I would imagine so, though. Bronx Zoo keeps both Blackbuck and Brow-Antlered Deer but no Banteng, they have Gaur instead.

    ~Thylo:cool:
     
  2. aardvark250

    aardvark250 Well-Known Member

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    Monrovia Zoo, Liberia 
     
  3. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Indeed, Los Angeles Zoo did exhibit zebra duiker; I saw them there several times back in the 1980s. The only other collection where I've ever seen the species is Frankfurt, also long ago.

    I would dearly love to see zebra duiker again but, sadly, I doubt that I ever will.
     
  4. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    You're right, HowlerMonkey. I saw zebra duikers when I visited LA Zoo in 1991. LA Zoo also had giant eland, gerenuk, red wolf, sifaka, drill, mountain and Baird's tapirs, red uakari, serow, yellow-footed rock wallaby and a two-headed garter snake.
     
  5. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

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    Thankfully, all of those other species are still around in US zoos, although some are significantly rarer than others. Seen the wolf, sifaka, and wallaby myself and fingers crossed I'll see the others at some point.

    ~Thylo:cool:
     
  6. savethelephant

    savethelephant Well-Known Member

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    I don't believe DAK has banteng but has replaced them with domestic water buffalo
     
  7. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Kagu
    Yellow-backed Duiker
    Tentacled Snake
    Lord Howe's Stick Insect
    Chinese Giant Salamander
    Tiger Moray Eel

    All in European zoos.
     
  8. ShonenJake13

    ShonenJake13 Well-Known Member

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    Come to London, we have a giant salamander!!
     
  9. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Only if I had a break from school :p
     
  10. ShonenJake13

    ShonenJake13 Well-Known Member

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    For the kagu and duikers, Wuppertal in Germany is your best bet. Valencia aquarium has the moray. A bit closer to home for the others; Bristol apparently have the stick insect, and Chester have the snake (though whether these are onshow is another question).
     
  11. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    The Tentacled Snakes at Chester are indeed on-display.
     
  12. bongorob

    bongorob Well-Known Member

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    any duiker apart from Red Natal
    lammergeier
    shoebill
    milky stork
    kagu
    any bird of paradise except red,greater and Wilson's
    horned parakeet
    kaka
    pangolin
    gerenuk
    springbok
    Marco Polo sheep
    forest reindeer
    hellbender
    Mhorr gazelle
    Madagascan ground boa
    Indian gavial
    ploughshare tortoise
    reedbuck
    walrus
    Steller's sealion
    northern elephant seal
     
  13. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Platypus
    Yapok
    Cuscus
    Javan gibbon
    Aye-aye
    Potto
    Hamlyn's owl-faced monkey
    Gelada
    Sulawesi macaque
    Steller's sea lion
    Sable antelope
    Gaur
    Kiwi
    Little penguin
    Kagu
    Kea
    Tuatara
    Ocean Sunfish

    I'm quite lucky to have seen most/almost all of the reptile and amphibian species I've always wanted to see. Tuataras are pretty much the only ones left on that list.
     
  14. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    A few more to my list:
    Northern cassowary
    Rufous hare wallaby (not sure if there are any in captivity)
    Gilbert's potoroos
    Coxen's fig parrot (sadly none in captivity)
    Ground parrots (either species)
    Golden shouldered parrot
    Numbat
    Kakapo
    Colenacth (sadly none in captivity)
    Orca
    Pink pigeon
    Anoa (either species)
    Capuchin bird
    Cloven featherd pigeon
    Sickle billed Vanga
    Three watteld bell bird
    Long watteld bell bird
    Crimson fruit crow
    Pink headed fruit dove

    Of course if somebody rediscovers/clones a thylacine, kouprey, quagga, stellers sea cow, raven parrot or a Haast's eagle I would be the first in line to see it.
     
    Last edited: 12 Jul 2016
  15. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

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    Also none kouprey in the wild. It,s as extinct as the last species that you mention.
    About coelacanth, it,s impossible to keep one in captivity. The conditions needed for it (specially water pressure) cannot be recreated artificially.
     
  16. DDcorvus

    DDcorvus Well-Known Member

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    Technically we actually can create aquariums with pressure that is mimicking the pressure of the depths where the coelacanth lives. It is not a deep sea species and has been spotted at depths of 100 meters, which would give a pressure of around 11 bar which is feasible to build (even though expensive taking into account the size of the species). Also take into account that Vancouver has build an aquarium which recreates the pressure at 2000 meters (yes it is very small but still it has to create a pressure of 200 bar).

    We do not really enough about the coelacanth to know what they need, water pressure is one those but the husbandry will give more challenges than pressure alone.
     
  17. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

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    Extremely interesting news! Where can I find more info about this deepwater tank at Vancouver?
    About coelacanth, I believe that those found at 100 meters depth are just warrants and the species is found usually much deeper. I think that is like a giant squid (and most squid species) breeding and borning in great depths but adults can occasionally be found near surface.
     
  18. DDcorvus

    DDcorvus Well-Known Member

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    It is called the Abyss Box and you can read more about it here:
    Deep Sea Life On View in 'Abyss Box' . I just found out it is actually a travelling exhibition and it is currently at the Oceanopolis in Brest.

    And we do not know enough about Coelacanth to be sure about which depths the species' normal range is and if the fish at 100 meters are indeed warrants or not. More study is needed and I think we would agree that taking any into captivity at the moment is not desirable. I have seen preserved fish in museums and they are of an impressive size.
     
  19. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    I realise it is impossible to keep coleancth in captivity (at least not yet anyway) but kouprey are listed crictally endangered, not extinct am I missing something?
     
  20. jbnbsn99

    jbnbsn99 Well-Known Member

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    The last Kouprey seen was a brief glimpse in 1981. Before that, it was about 1960 (there may have been a very few unreported sightings in the 70s). Chances are, that large of an animal going unnoticed for 35 years are slim. Safe bet is on being extinct.