Join our zoo community

Which extinct pigeon species would you bring back if you could?

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Sarus Crane, 15 Dec 2019.

?

Which extinct pigeon species would you bring back if you could?

This poll will close on 15 Mar 2020 at 2:38 AM.
  1. Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius)

    66.7%
  2. Liverpool Pigeon (Caloenas maculata)

    7.4%
  3. Choiseul Pigeon (Microgoura meeki)

    18.5%
  4. Rodrigues Blue Pigeon (Alectroenas rodericana)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Mauritius Blue Pigeon (Alectroenas nitidissima)

    3.7%
  6. Reunion Pigeon (Columba duboisi)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Bonin Wood Pigeon (Columba versicolor)

    3.7%
  1. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15 Oct 2010
    Posts:
    2,300
    Location:
    Dorset, UK
    I agree those birds aren't Passenger Pigeons, but am not convinced they would not adapt to breeding in smaller groups or single pairs.
     
    ThylacineAlive likes this.
  2. Luke da Zoo nerd

    Luke da Zoo nerd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2019
    Posts:
    420
    Location:
    Minneapolis
    I voted passenger, but the Liverpool pigeon is cool too. I didn't think it would compete with the passenger though.
     
  3. tetrapod

    tetrapod Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10 Apr 2008
    Posts:
    1,284
    Location:
    sw england
    Refused to vote due to the lack of Natunaornis gigoura - Fiji's version of a dodo, the Viti Levu giant pigeon.
     
    Batto likes this.
  4. drill

    drill Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Feb 2017
    Posts:
    1,175
    Location:
    Norfolk, Va
    Why bring back Passenger when you already have Mourning.
     
  5. Sheather

    Sheather Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    13 May 2013
    Posts:
    111
    Location:
    Chicagoland
    dramatic behavioral differences
     
  6. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2010
    Posts:
    12,074
    Location:
    Wilds of Northumberland
    And, as noted upthread, not actually all that closely related to Zenaida.
     
  7. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2013
    Posts:
    1,820
    Location:
    Baltic Sea - no more
    Isn't that a tad bit superficial? "I'm sorry, but we cannot resurrect your species." "But, why???" "You're not attractive enough and don't look like pigeons. Next!" :p

    As for the aforementioned Carolina parakeet, it always makes me sad to think that if the German ornithologist Hans Freiherr von Berlepsch had taken better care, the species might have had a chance for a comeback thanks to ex situ conservation.
    Once in zoos but now extinct
     
  8. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2015
    Posts:
    801
    Location:
    QLD Australia
    So no one knows where Liverpool pigeons are from? Is this a scenario where a specimen was collected and then sat in a museum for years before someone recognised it was something new and unique?
     
  9. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2010
    Posts:
    12,074
    Location:
    Wilds of Northumberland
    Not quite; it was recognised as distinct by the ornithologist John Latham in the 18th century based on two specimens and a drawing which he had been shown (of which one specimen and the drawing have been lost), but he wasn't given locality information for either specimen. We can make educated guesses that the species lived in the South Pacific based on the origin of other specimens in the two personal collections which held them, and some suggestion has been made that the species came from Tahiti due to reports of a somewhat-similar bird in the accounts of Tahitians interviewed in the 1920s.

    Unfortunately, after being recognised as distinct for many years, in the 19th century the zoological consensus was that the species was probably just a deformed Nicobar Pigeon - largely due to the fact Rothschild held a lot of influence and didn't accept the species himself - and although this has now been conclusively debunked, valuable time (and one specimen) was lost so we likely will never know for sure.
     
    animal_expert01 likes this.
  10. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2019
    Posts:
    455
    Location:
    Brazil
    Hope I don't come across as a spoil sport or to sound like a total bore but to be frank I wouldn't want to bring back any of them from extinction in that hypothetical situation.

    I'd rather focus and mobilize resources / research and attention on extant but critically endangered columbidae species and particularly those from Brazil like the purple winged ground dove and the blue eyed ground dove.

    I feel that living species have to be the priority and I think that the passenger pigeon and other extinct columbids do serve as very poignant (and useful) illustrative symbols and reminders of the tragedy of extinction.